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FCDO ODA allocations for 2021/22 were announced on 21 April 2021. Changes to individual programmes are underway. The information on this website may not reflect the latest allocated budgets for this year. This information will be updated in due course.

UK aid from the British people

Zambia

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Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund Round 3

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

Illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is the fifth most lucrative transnational crime, worth up to £17bn a year globally. As well as threatening species with extinction, IWT destroys vital ecosystems. IWT also fosters corruption, feeds insecurity, and undermines good governance and the rule of law. The UK government is committed to tackling illegal trade of wildlife products. Defra manages the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, which is a competitive grants scheme with the objective of tackling illegal wildlife trade and, in doing so, contributing to sustainable development in developing countries. Projects funded under the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund address one, or more, of the following themes: • Developing sustainable livelihoods to benefit people directly affected by IWT • Strengthening law enforcement • Ensuring effective legal frameworks • Reducing demand for IWT products Over £23 million has been committed to 75 projects since the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund was established in 2013; five projects were awarded in 2014 (via applications to the Darwin Initiative), fourteen in 2015, fifteen in 2016, thirteen in 2017, fourteen in 2018 and in the latest round in 2019. This round of funding includes the following projects (details of which can be found at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/811381/iwt-project-list-2019.pdf). The projects that a relevant for this area are IWT035 to IWT047.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-IWTCF-R3

Start Date:

2017-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£4,123,118


Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund Round 5

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

Illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is the fifth most lucrative transnational crime, worth up to £17bn a year globally. As well as threatening species with extinction, IWT destroys vital ecosystems. IWT also fosters corruption, feeds insecurity, and undermines good governance and the rule of law. The UK government is committed to tackling illegal trade of wildlife products. Defra manages the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, which is a competitive grants scheme with the objective of tackling illegal wildlife trade and, in doing so, contributing to sustainable development in developing countries. Projects funded under the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund address one, or more, of the following themes: • Developing sustainable livelihoods to benefit people directly affected by IWT • Strengthening law enforcement • Ensuring effective legal frameworks • Reducing demand for IWT products Over £23 million has been committed to 75 projects since the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund was established in 2013; five projects were awarded in 2014 (via applications to the Darwin Initiative), fourteen in 2015, fifteen in 2016, thirteen in 2017, fourteen in 2018 and in the latest round in 2019. This round of funding includes the following projects (details of which can be found at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/811381/iwt-project-list-2019.pdf)): IWT062, IWT063, IWT064, IWT065, IWT066, IWT067, IWT068, IWT069, IWT070, IWT071, IWT072, IWT073, IWT074, IWT075.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-IWTCF-R5

Start Date:

2019-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£4,588,554


The Initiative for Sustainable Forest Landscapes (ISFL) - Bio Carbon Fund

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

A multilateral project administered by the World Bank which aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the land use sector through sustainable landscape management, whilst improving the livelihoods of forest communities. The ISFL combines upfront technical assistance with results-based finance which rewards countries which implement landscape-level approaches that reduce emissions from the forest and land-use sector. ISFL works with 5 countries: Colombia, Indonesia, Ethiopia, Mexico and Zambia. Defra is supporting programmes in Indonesia and Zambia with upfront finance and potentially all countries with results based finance.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-ICF-P0004-ISFL

Start Date:

2013-12-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£65,100,000


Funding to build capacity and support cross-border action on the conservation of wildlife within countries in the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA)

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

The funding will be used to support KAZA countries to develop African-led trans-frontier approaches to support conservation of wildlife, including iconic species such as elephants through efforts in integrated land-use planning, human-wildlife conflict mitigation, community livelihoods and illegal wildlife trade. This funding will be used to provide technical assistance and build capacity within the KAZA countries to address areas for immediate action, provide a foundation for future work programmes and support access to wider funding options.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-IWT-KAZA01

Start Date:

2019-09-04

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,000,000


Darwin Initiative Round 23

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

The Darwin Initiative is a UK government grants scheme that helps to protect biodiversity and the natural environment through locally based projects worldwide. The initiative funds projects that help countries rich in biodiversity but poor in financial resources to meet their objectives under one or more of the biodiversity conventions. The objective is to to address threats to biodiversity such as: - habitat loss or degradation - climate change - invasive species - over-exploitation - pollution and eutrophication.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-DAR23

Start Date:

2018-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£7,619,619


Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund Round 4

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

Illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is the fifth most lucrative transnational crime, worth up to £17bn a year globally. As well as threatening species with extinction, IWT destroys vital ecosystems. IWT also fosters corruption, feeds insecurity, and undermines good governance and the rule of law. The UK government is committed to tackling illegal trade of wildlife products. Defra manages the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, which is a competitive grants scheme with the objective of tackling illegal wildlife trade and, in doing so, contributing to sustainable development in developing countries. Projects funded under the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund address one, or more, of the following themes: • Developing sustainable livelihoods to benefit people directly affected by IWT • Strengthening law enforcement • Ensuring effective legal frameworks • Reducing demand for IWT products Over £23 million has been committed to 75 projects since the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund was established in 2013; five projects were awarded in 2014 (via applications to the Darwin Initiative), fourteen in 2015, fifteen in 2016, thirteen in 2017, fourteen in 2018 and in the latest round in 2019. This round of funding includes the following projects (details of which can be found at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/811381/iwt-project-list-2019.pdf): IWT048, IWT049, IWT050, IWT051, IWT052, IWT053, IWT054, IWT055, IWT056, IWT057, IWT058, IWT059, IWT0760, IWT061.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-IWTCF-R4

Start Date:

2018-07-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£4,505,210


Fleming Fund – Country and Regional Grants and Fellowships Programme

UK - Department of Health (DH)

The Fleming Fund helps low- and middle-income countries to fight antimicrobial resistance. A management agent has been appointed to deliver: country grants 24 low- and middle-income countries, regional grants in West Africa, East and Southern Africa, South Asia and South East Asia, and a global fellowships programme. These initiatives aim to improve laboratory capacity and diagnosis as well as data and surveillance of antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-10-FF_MA

Start Date:

2016-10-10

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£258,497,532.75


Zambeef Products PLC

CDC Group plc

Investment by CDC in Zambeef Products PLC to help promote agricultural self-sufficiency and improving food security. The investment will support the company’s growth plans and environmental and social improvements. Zambeef is a large local employer providing 6,200 jobs, 98 per cent of which are held by Zambians.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F300801

Start Date:

2016-09-15

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


IHS Zambia Ltd

CDC Group plc

Debt investment to support the development of telecommunications towers to improve accessibility and reliability of coverage.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F311101

Start Date:

2015-10-27

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


British Academy Coherence & Impact - Challenge-led grants: Urban Infrastructures of Well-being

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

This programme supports interdisciplinary research across the social and engineering sciences and the humanities looking to explore how formal and informal infrastructures interact to affect the well-being of people in cities across the Global South.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-GCRF-CImChlGUWB

Start Date:

2019-10-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£5,838,971


British Academy Core - Challenge-led grants: Sustainable Development

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

This programme funds excellent, policy-oriented UK research, aimed at addressing the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and advancing the UK’s Aid Strategy. It supports researchers in the humanities and the social sciences working to generate evidence on the challenges and opportunities faced in developing countries and respond to the Sustainable Development Goals. The Academy is particularly keen to encourage applications from the humanities in this round.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-BA-GCRF-04

Start Date:

2016-12-31

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£8,895,000


Towards transdisciplinary understanding of inherited soil surveys: an exploratory case study in Zambia.

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Sustainable agriculture must preserve the soil so that it can be used agriculturally in the long term. Communities adapt their farming practices to face environmental, economic and social challenges. This process of adaptation can be supported by research, but only if we understand the soil, how its properties, potential and limitations vary in space and how communities have adapted their farming practices in the past. Soil survey has conventionally been a way to generate knowledge about the variation of the soil and how it is used. At present the development of sustainable agriculture is a challenge in many countries, particularly in the global south, not least because of climate change. Tackling these problems requires collaboration between different specialists. Whether a technical solution will succeed will always depend, at least in part, on social factors. Is an innovation compatible with practices, values and traditions of a community? Does it affect how agricultural labour is divided over time, between social groups, between adults and children and between genders? Studies of farming systems also show that these have rarely been fixed, but have changed over time, in response to different social and environmental factors. This suggests that a historical perspective on sustainable agriculture could be just as important as the perspective of the natural and social sciences in developing robust, equitable and effective solutions to contemporary problems in food security. We contend that collaborative study of the processes and products of soil survey from the colonial era (1930s in southern Sub-Saharan Africa, SSA) until the late 20th century, would provide a context in which natural scientists, social scientists and historians could develop an integrated approach to understanding sustainable agriculture. It would also address a very pressing practical problem. This problem is the scarcity of information on the soil and its variation in space over most of SSA. Collecting soil data is costly, and few people have the expertise to do it. Yet, the soil surveys produced in Africa in the past, have rarely been mobilised to address contemporary problems. We contend that these sources provide a unique window into past decisions and assumptions about the soil, whose effects are still felt today. In these soil surveys are embedded a rich set of observations and interpretations, along with hard data (soil analyses) and maps. However, old surveys cannot just be dusted off and used as if new. First, there is the technical challenge of determining whether the analyses are still reliable. Furthermore, the survey was commissioned in a particular historical context to address particular problems. Farming was done by communities with particular structures and power relations, and some perspectives will have influenced surveyors more than others. In short, the soil scientist, historian and social scientist all have a critical role in the process of appraising an inherited survey and identifying its possible strengths and weakness when used to support contemporary decisions about farming and the land. Through the proposed cross disciplinary UK-Zambia partnership, we will critically interrogate a number of inherited soil surveys created in Zambia, from the colonial period to the present, developing a theoretical framework for their appraisal. Our intention throughout is to show how triangulating perspectives from the history, social science and soil science can develop a shared evaluation of these surveys. An evaluation, furthermore, that can be applied to pressing current problems relating to soil quality in the region. To this end, we will engage with policy makers, agricultural advisors, NGOs and farmer groups to plan further funded work so that inherited soil surveys in Zambia, and elsewhere (SSA and beyond), can best be used to develop sustainable agriculture as a basis for food security into the future.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-AH_T00410X_1

Start Date:

2019-11-11

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£175,135.83


Energy Democracy and the Politics of Energy Transition in African Countries

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Historically, electrification in developing countries has been led by efforts to provide centralised, large-scale generation, as was the case in developed countries. Latterly, policies and regulations to facilitate energy transition toward low-carbon generation of energy have on the whole been designed for industrial countries, and then transferred to major developing countries with some success in major emerging countries (for instance in South Africa). These approaches have so far achieved little impact in Least Developed and low-income countries. This is mainly due to the relative weakness of their institutions and of attendant regulatory architectures, and a lack of adequate governance structures to implement them. In the case of many African countries, moreover, planning for energy transitions is made more complicated by the competing priority of increasing access to modern energy services, as well as by the political economy competition between centralised, clientelist states and varying degrees of initiatives towards decentralization and devolution of powers towards local governance structures. RETs production and deployment have risen substantially globally, on the back of huge industrialisation and subsequent cost reductions in the order of 80%. In many low-middle and middle-income developing countries the question is, how can the strategic political understanding of many of these countries which is dominated by grid outreach be changed to incorporate the substantial decentralized, off-grid provision that will be necessary to achieve both effective outreach and low carbon transition? If the habit of centralized monopoly can be broken in African countries with small electricity markets by the introduction of RETs, will this lead necessarily to more decentralised systems or, on the contrary, will centralised systems be perpetuated with the same limited number of players? And in the case that decentralised RETs are being implemented will this lead to a democratisation of the energy systems or to the reinforcement of non-democratic local authorities? The research will survey current practices associated with decentralization and local governance of energy supplies, consider established good practice and look to build routes forward with wider stakeholder communities. It will consider also the evolution of social imaginaries linked to energy transition in African countries, from national governments down to local communities. How can policy-makers in the energy sector integrate RETs in their way of thinking? Do they perceive differences with conventional energy technologies - not just technical differences but also differences in terms of social implications, and do they understand the implications for local governance through formal and informal structures, and any existing political decentralization initiatives? How might perspectives best be changed to enable both RET deployment and enhanced energy access? Are grass roots organisations capable of proposing, developing, operating and maintaining an alternative vision? Do they perceive RETs as having the potential to empower local communities, or as 'second-hand electricity'? What are the needs of communities not just in terms of energy, but also in terms of the role they can take in meeting those needs and in working with providers to enable access which meets those needs most effectively? What financing models would best enable this? What other elements of regulation can help to enable all of this? What is required to happen amongst governance organisations to enable a shift from the centralised to a decentralised model?

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-ES_T006285_1

Start Date:

2020-03-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£557,145.12


Life-Saving Lullabies: Reducing adolescent maternal and neonatal deaths in Zambia

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Across the world, caregivers have sung sentimental and traditional folk lullabies to their babies for over four millennia with many transcending the generations as oral tradition. (McDowell, 1977). Ethnomusicological studies of lullabies texts have uncovered that lullabies are imbued with both covert and overt orientated objectives; from an expression of love and affection as well as a pacifier for mothers' to reclaim precious time for work or sleep (Ebeogu, 2017; Klymasz, 1968). Until now, the potential for extending the functional purpose of lullaby lyrics as a methodological tool for delivering essential knowledge and survival skills to support behaviour change and the development of better parenting practices has been overlooked. 'Life-Saving Lullabies' is a highly novel, adaptable, transferable and sustainable arts-based innovation strategy that seeks to disrupt the traditional models of healthcare practice and service delivery, while informing a new approach to improve the health and wellbeing outcomes of adolescent mothers and their newborn in resource-stressed environments. Central to this, is our human-centred design approach that will: confront inequalities associated with the accessibility of antenatal care services (ANC); improve upon the current ANC practices used to up-skill service users with maternal health information; and empower local communities to conceive new lullabies to address immediate local and national challenges. Importantly, we will achieve this by foregrounding the needs of young mothers from their experience rather than those defined by clinicians or others removed from the intimate daily and nightly social being of women. In recognising mothers' experiences as women, our primary focus will be supporting the transition of adolescents into motherhood to reduce maternal and postnatal mortalities across the care-giving continuum: pregnancy, birth, postnatal and childhood. This project fills an urgent strategic need in Zambia- increasing the number of youth-friendly services that address the family planning needs of adolescents and educates them about pregnancy, danger signs and newborn care. The goal of the project is to apply art, design and humanities research methodologies to discover, define, develop, deliver and empower adolescent parents and caregivers with responsive skills for meeting their needs as both women and mothers. We will apply our collective knowledge to co-compose a repertoire of new 'life-saving lullabies'. This repertoire will created by and for local communities and will directly respond to the President's declaration, the strategic needs of the Ministry of Health and the viewpoint of frontline MCH teams: the impact of pregnancy and motherhood on women; awareness of malaria in pregnancy; awareness of the critical danger signs following birth (APGAR: Appearance, Pulse, Grimace, Activity, and Respiration); importance of medication compliance and good nutrition for a healthier mother and baby; and attending ANC services for a safer pregnancy and delivery.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-AH_T011947_1

Start Date:

2020-02-21

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£97,346.57


British Council - Zambia

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

Contributing to shared prosperity and development through projects which support improvements in young people's education, providing them with skills and positive pathways for their future lives and through projects which promote the development of arts and culture.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-3-BC-ZM-17

Start Date:

2016-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£3,167,687.58


Chevening Scholarships in Zambia

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

Assistance in line with UK objectives on Chevening Scholarships in Zambia which enables students to pursue postgraduate study at UK higher education institutions, returning to contribute to the development of their home country

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-3-Chevening-Scholarships-ZM

Start Date:

2018-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,460,966


PFA Project for P0233 (Zambia PFA)

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

Title: PFA Project for P0233 (Zambia PFA)

Project identifier:

GB-1-101637

Start Date:

2002-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£163,000


Zambia Health Systems Strengthening Programme

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

The Zambia Health Systems Strengthening programme aims improve the health of women and girls in Zambia across the continuum of care from birth, childhood and motherhood. This together with our other parallel interventions to strengthen the health system, will by 2021 result in a reduction in child and maternal deaths by 25% and 15% respectively and contribute towards attainment of the sustainable development goal for health. The nutrition status of 500,000 children, women and young girls will be improved and 270,000 girls and women gain access to family planning.

Project identifier:

GB-1-204640

Start Date:

2016-08-19

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£36,003,285


Africa Division funding to the African Agriculture Development Company (AgDevCo)

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

AgDevCo is a specialised investor and project developer focused exclusively on early stage Small and Medium Enterprise agribusiness in Sub Saharan Africa. AgDevCo deploys patient capital and technical assistance to build profitable businesses that contribute to food security, drive economic growth and create jobs and income in rural areas and contribute to farmers’ resilience to climate change. AgDevCo currently operates in Sierra Leone, Ghana, Cote D'Ivoire, Rwanda, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia.

Project identifier:

GB-1-204270

Start Date:

2013-09-24

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£152,313,492


Tackling Maternal and Child Undernutrition Programme- Phase II

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

To contribute towards improved health and nutrition status for children under two years measured primarily by a reduction in stunting by 2023.

Project identifier:

GB-1-203551

Start Date:

2012-12-10

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£29,407,699




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