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Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund Round 5

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

Illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is the fifth most lucrative transnational crime, worth up to £17bn a year globally. As well as threatening species with extinction, IWT destroys vital ecosystems. IWT also fosters corruption, feeds insecurity, and undermines good governance and the rule of law. The UK government is committed to tackling illegal trade of wildlife products. Defra manages the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, which is a competitive grants scheme with the objective of tackling illegal wildlife trade and, in doing so, contributing to sustainable development in developing countries. Projects funded under the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund address one, or more, of the following themes: • Developing sustainable livelihoods to benefit people directly affected by IWT • Strengthening law enforcement • Ensuring effective legal frameworks • Reducing demand for IWT products Over £23 million has been committed to 75 projects since the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund was established in 2013; five projects were awarded in 2014 (via applications to the Darwin Initiative), fourteen in 2015, fifteen in 2016, thirteen in 2017, fourteen in 2018 and in the latest round in 2019. This round of funding includes the following projects (details of which can be found at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/811381/iwt-project-list-2019.pdf)): IWT062, IWT063, IWT064, IWT065, IWT066, IWT067, IWT068, IWT069, IWT070, IWT071, IWT072, IWT073, IWT074, IWT075.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-IWTCF-R5

Start Date:

2019-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£4,588,554


Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund Round 3

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

Illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is the fifth most lucrative transnational crime, worth up to £17bn a year globally. As well as threatening species with extinction, IWT destroys vital ecosystems. IWT also fosters corruption, feeds insecurity, and undermines good governance and the rule of law. The UK government is committed to tackling illegal trade of wildlife products. Defra manages the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, which is a competitive grants scheme with the objective of tackling illegal wildlife trade and, in doing so, contributing to sustainable development in developing countries. Projects funded under the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund address one, or more, of the following themes: • Developing sustainable livelihoods to benefit people directly affected by IWT • Strengthening law enforcement • Ensuring effective legal frameworks • Reducing demand for IWT products Over £23 million has been committed to 75 projects since the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund was established in 2013; five projects were awarded in 2014 (via applications to the Darwin Initiative), fourteen in 2015, fifteen in 2016, thirteen in 2017, fourteen in 2018 and in the latest round in 2019. This round of funding includes the following projects (details of which can be found at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/811381/iwt-project-list-2019.pdf). The projects that a relevant for this area are IWT035 to IWT047.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-IWTCF-R3

Start Date:

2017-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£4,123,118


Darwin Initiative Round 26

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

The Darwin Initiative is a UK government grants scheme that helps to protect biodiversity and the natural environment through locally based projects worldwide. The initiative funds projects that help countries rich in biodiversity but poor in financial resources to meet their objectives under one or more of the biodiversity conventions. The objective is to to address threats to biodiversity such as: - habitat loss or degradation - climate change - invasive species - over-exploitation - pollution and eutrophication

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-DAR26

Start Date:

2020-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£5,607,898


Establishing and enhancing veterinary surveillance of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and use in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs)

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

This project aims to help establish effective surveillance for longer term capacity building for AMR in the terrestrial and aquatic veterinary sectors in selected LMICs, and to enhance veterinary medicines regulatory training.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-VMD-AMR001

Start Date:

2019-09-16

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£400,000


Darwin Initiative Round 24

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

The Darwin Initiative is a UK government grants scheme that helps to protect biodiversity and the natural environment through locally based projects worldwide. The initiative funds projects that help countries rich in biodiversity but poor in financial resources to meet their objectives under one or more of the biodiversity conventions. The objective is to to address threats to biodiversity such as: - habitat loss or degradation - climate change - invasive species - over-exploitation - pollution and eutrophication

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-DAR24

Start Date:

2018-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£10,604,188


Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund Round 4

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

Illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is the fifth most lucrative transnational crime, worth up to £17bn a year globally. As well as threatening species with extinction, IWT destroys vital ecosystems. IWT also fosters corruption, feeds insecurity, and undermines good governance and the rule of law. The UK government is committed to tackling illegal trade of wildlife products. Defra manages the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, which is a competitive grants scheme with the objective of tackling illegal wildlife trade and, in doing so, contributing to sustainable development in developing countries. Projects funded under the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund address one, or more, of the following themes: • Developing sustainable livelihoods to benefit people directly affected by IWT • Strengthening law enforcement • Ensuring effective legal frameworks • Reducing demand for IWT products Over £23 million has been committed to 75 projects since the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund was established in 2013; five projects were awarded in 2014 (via applications to the Darwin Initiative), fourteen in 2015, fifteen in 2016, thirteen in 2017, fourteen in 2018 and in the latest round in 2019. This round of funding includes the following projects (details of which can be found at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/811381/iwt-project-list-2019.pdf): IWT048, IWT049, IWT050, IWT051, IWT052, IWT053, IWT054, IWT055, IWT056, IWT057, IWT058, IWT059, IWT0760, IWT061.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-IWTCF-R4

Start Date:

2018-07-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£4,505,210


Fleming Fund – Country and Regional Grants and Fellowships Programme

UK - Department of Health (DH)

The Fleming Fund helps low- and middle-income countries to fight antimicrobial resistance. A management agent has been appointed to deliver: country grants 24 low- and middle-income countries, regional grants in West Africa, East and Southern Africa, South Asia and South East Asia, and a global fellowships programme. These initiatives aim to improve laboratory capacity and diagnosis as well as data and surveillance of antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-10-FF_MA

Start Date:

2016-10-10

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£258,497,532.75


Enhancing essential oil feedstocks and high-value products from Mentha species for local Ugandan economies.

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Several aromatic oil compounds (essential oils) of high commercial value are produced naturally by the leaves of mint plants (Mentha). Mint oil extracts are promoted for their health benefits and are used to flavour drinks, ice cream, chewing gum, as well as in cosmetics and personal care products such as toothpaste and shower gel. Menthol is a key component of mint essential oils, particularly those isolated from peppermint Mentha x piperita, and has a large international market with a value of around $800m p.a. Another chemical component, nepetalactone, a potent natural insect repellent normally found in catnip, has recently been identified in the pineapple mint species Mentha suaveolens. As part of a previous collaborative project, the potential for mint as a non-food crop for Ugandan farmers has been explored, a mint garden with selected varieties established near Kampala, and pilot-scale distillation equipment constructed to extract oil from a harvested spearmint crop. This suggests that wide-scale commercial cultivation of mint crops in Uganda could represent a viable resource for globally competitive production of mint essential oils. This project aims to develop novel mint varieties for cultivation in Uganda to produce high yields of essential oils containing menthol or nepetalactone which will be used to develop locally-produced products for the benefit of the rural Ugandan economy. This application, involving partnerships between Cardiff (Wales) and Makerere (Uganda) Universities, seeks to maximise the production of selected essential oils using two parallel strategies. Firstly, we will screen a range of mint varieties to identify those with naturally high yields of menthol or nepetalactone using biochemical analysis (chromatography) of extracted oils, and those with the largest abundance of oil-bearing glandular leaf hairs (trichomes) by microscopic analysis of the leaf surface. The second strategy will be to manipulate key genes involved in the biosynthesis of essential oils in the leaf, with the aim of creating new 'elite' mint varieties by up-regulating the production of menthol. Such genetic modifications are feasible, due to recent advances in scientific understanding of the biochemical pathway leading to menthol production in mint oil. The most promising mint varieties will be selected for subsequent field trials to determine their viability for growth under potentially conditions of water availability, shading and soil type, in three regions of Uganda. Together with our partners in Uganda, we will create local Community Enterprise (CE) groups to propagate and distribute plant material to farmers, and provide the necessary training to cultivate/harvest the crop, ensuring agricultural best practice. In turn, this will improve local systems of agricultural production, harvesting and extraction technology and result in substantive up-skilling of the local rural population. In addition, we will devise agro-economic models of mint crop production, and develop business plans and marketing strategies to guide emerging local business ventures. This project will ensure that sustainable financial benefits accrue principally to local communities in Uganda, via CE groups set up to grow, harvest and exploit new mint crops. The project will explore the development of products for sale in collaboration with local-based partners, enabling rural populations in Uganda to benefit sustainably from science-based enhanced production of mint essential oils.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-BB_S011501_1

Start Date:

2019-01-31

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£816,239.97


GCRF_NF118: Capacity building reliable diagnostic & epidemiological tools to confront the spectre of a COVID-19 epidemic in refugee communities...

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Evidence-led policymaking for COVID-19 control relies on accurate understanding the epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 infections by correlating diagnostics, molecular fingerprinting and patient metadata (intrinsic (e.g. age), and extrinsic (e.g. travel history)). Efforts to correlate these data in Uganda are stalling, despite available local expertise, because laboratories designated for diagnosing and tracking COVID-19 are under-resourced, and widespread mistrust of diagnostic workflows. Current policy is therefore shaped by data from industrialised countries, which may be misleading due to significant differences in the population demographics and underlying health status. Laboratory facilities in northern Uganda are lacking: i) reagents and experience of reliable workflows for processing of COVID-19 diagnostics; ii) whole genome sequencing equipment and consumables for providing robust epidemiological information. We will address these needs by bringing together UK-based academics and industrial partners with Ugandan biologists and policymakers to rapidly build local capacity for SARS-CoV-2 diagnostics and real-time epidemiology. Specifically: Transfer knowledge of SARS-CoV-2 diagnostic workflows from leading UK testing centres (NHS, Lighthouse Labs) to Uganda. Establish Nanopore sequencing and bioinformatics in northern Uganda, supported by Salford/Liverpool/COG-UK partners, and facilitate their long-term adoption by Ugandan laboratories (UVRI, Makerere University). Combine WGS with new survey-based patient metadata to provide real-time SARS-CoV-2 genomics, including strains circulating around refugee settlements, to support the Ugandan Ministry of Health and Prime Minister's Office to promptly mitigate local and national COVID-19 spread. Bring together industry and logistics partners with Ugandan policymakers, to identify and address bottlenecks in the equipment and consumable supply chain, to support cost-effective, future Ugandan bioscience.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-EP_V029177_1

Start Date:

2020-08-21

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£515,547.11


British Academy Coherence & Impact - Youth Futures

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The projects funded under this programme support research which brings a much-needed youth-led perspective on the UN’s 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda. They involve genuine interdisciplinarity, collaborative work that extends beyond the standard research model, and policy thinking based on close understanding of, and working with, young people at various stages of ‘getting by’.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-GCRF-CImYF

Start Date:

2020-01-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£5,760,000


Royal Academy of Engineering Core - Frontiers of Engineering for Development

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Frontiers of Engineering for Development is a series of interdisciplinary symposia that facilitates national and international collaboration to tackle global development challenges. The event brings together a select group of around 60 emerging UK and global engineering and international development leaders from industry and academia to discuss pioneering technical work and cutting-edge research for international development from a diversity of engineering fields. Seed funding is available to progress some of the best ideas coming out of the event. COVID-19

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-RAENG-GCRF-07

Start Date:

2016-12-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£2,028,324.76


Royal Academy of Engineering Core - Africa Catalyst

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

GCRF Africa Catalyst aims to strengthen professional engineering bodies in sub-Saharan Africa so that they can effectively promote the profession, share best practice and increase local engineering capacity, to help drive development. This is supported by high-quality research focusing on expanding the evidence base for the importance of robust engineering institutions and the role they play in delivering sustainable growth, and mapping engineering capacity and diversity in sub-Saharan Africa.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-RAENG-GCRF-01

Start Date:

2016-10-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£2,943,489.17


British Academy Coherence & Impact - Challenge-led grants: Heritage, Dignity & Violence

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Tackling the challenge of achieving sustainable peace and preventing violence requires a consideration of local cultures, practices, histories and societal norms, and an understanding of how such norms are complex and contextually differentiated and intersectionally experienced. It is often the case that these considerations are not well or fully brought into policy and practice that tend to ignore aesthetic, representational, and reflective practices. New approaches that cross sectoral and disciplinary boundaries are vital in achieving a step change in this area. The projects funded under this programme demonstrate an innovative and interdisciplinary approach yielding new conceptual understandings, developing ground-breaking research and energising innovative collaborations in the humanities and social sciences.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-GCRF-CImChlGHDV

Start Date:

2020-10-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£4,200,000


British Academy Coherence & Impact - Education and Learning in Crises

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

This programme funds research exploring the challenges of education and learning in contexts of conflict and protracted crises.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-GCRF-CImERICC

Start Date:

2020-01-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,500,000


Global Energy Transfer Feed-in Tariff (GETFiT)

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The Global Energy Transfer for Feed-in Tariff (GET FiT) Programme was established in 2013 with the main objective of assisting Uganda to pursue a climate resilient low-carbon development path by facilitating private sector investments in renewable electricity generation projects. The support provided was expected to improve access to electricity and promote growth and economic development in Uganda and contribute to climate change mitigation.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-ICF-0009-GETFiT

Start Date:

2013-03-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£25,800,000


Royal Academy of Engineering Academies Collective Fund: Resilient Futures - Frontiers of Development

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Frontiers of Development is part of the Joint Resilient Futures Initiative which is a collaboration between all four UK Academies under the GCRF. The aim of the JRF initiative is to construct a pipeline in the UK and the developing world for interdisciplinary researchers focused on tackling development challenges in a sustainable manner.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-RAENG-GCRF-08

Start Date:

2017-10-24

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,412,850.85


Royal Academy of Engineering Core - Higher Education Partnerships in Sub-Saharan Africa

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The Higher Education Partnerships in sub-Saharan Africa Programme (HEP SSA) – supported by the Anglo American Group Foundation and the UK Government through the Global Challenges Research Fund – was established by the Royal Academy of Engineering in 2016, following the successful pilot scheme, Enriching Engineering Education Programme. COVID-19

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-RAENG-GCRF-05

Start Date:

2016-07-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£78,852.39


Royal Academy of Engineering Core - Engineering a Better World

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Engineering a Better World is a unique programme focused on achieving sustainable development, through innovative, collaborative, challenge-led engineering. COVID-19

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-RAENG-GCRF-04

Start Date:

2019-09-16

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,338,436


Prevention of severe RSV infection by a helminth-induced serum factor that elicits antiviral monocytes?

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

In babies and toddlers worldwide, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of a type of chest infection called bronchiolitis and causes severe lung inflammation. 2-3% of all babies in the UK have to be admitted to hospital with RSV bronchiolitis and some of them develop very severe and sometimes life-threatening disease. This happens particularly when very high numbers of virus particles are present after infection. Due to treatment costs and costs for the wider society (e.g. days lost at work for parents/ carers) RSV is responsible for a major financial burden. Despite all of this, no specific treatment or effective, widely available preventative interventions exist and novel approaches are urgently required. Palivizumab, a prophylactic antibody against RSV, can prevent hospital admissions by about 50% but due to high cost its use is limited to small groups of high-risk infants in affluent countries. We have previously reported that infection with a gut parasite worm can reduce the number of viral particles in the lungs and disease severity in a mouse model of RSV infection. More recently, we have found that protection from severe RSV infection in this model is associated with increased production of immune cells called monocytes in the bone marrow and their accumulation in the lung. Monocytes are thought to be important in the immune response to RSV, but how they exert their antiviral effect is not fully understood. Importantly, all the above effects of parasite infection can be recapitulated with cell-free blood serum from infected mice, unless it has been heated. This suggests a central role for a protein in the serum, such as an immune system messenger molecule, as the soluble RSV-protective factor. If we can identify this factor, and work out what it is doing, we may in the future be able to develop a novel approach to protection from severe RSV disease in young children. Here, we will initially use our mouse model to study which subgroups of monocytes occur and which monocyte genes are 'switched on' during parasite infection, in order to define the mechanisms by which monocytes limit RSV infection. We will then use two approaches to identify the RSV-protective factor from blood serum; one where we measure, block and replace known candidate immune mediators in the serum, and another where we test groups of serum proteins of different sizes for their anti-RSV effect, followed by measurement of the proteins within the effective group and identification of candidate factors. These will then be tested individually for their antiviral effect and the RSV-protective factor will be identified. Finally, to translate our findings from the mouse model to humans, we will use existing blood samples from Ugandan children with and without gut parasite worms. We will assess the activation of genes to see if those with parasite infection also have more monocytes and more active anti-viral genes in their blood and we will measure the concentration of the newly identified RSV-protective factor to see if it is elevated in parasite-infected children. These studies will let us find out which parasite-induced factor is responsible for the protection from RSV infection and how monocytes contribute to this protection. They will also tell us if the RSV-protective factor and/or monocytes will be promising new targets to develop preventive treatment for severe RSV bronchiolitis.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-MR_T029668_1

Start Date:

2020-08-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


Ensuring access to health care and medicines during COVID-19: critical challenges and feasible policy options for the medicines retail sector

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Managing pandemics and ensuring ongoing access to medicines is a difficult task for any government. In most high income settings, this can be achieved by activities focussed on public health systems. In countries such as Uganda, however, 40-70% of medicines for fever, headaches and cough are delivered through drug shops, private clinics and pharmacies. Governments need to create policies and programmes so that the medicines retail sector (MRS) can continue to provide treatment for common infectious diseases like malaria and bacterial pneumonia; does not become a 'hotspot' for disease transmission; and can actively contribute to the public health response during disease outbreaks. It is difficult for governments to know how to involve the MRS in responses to COVID-19. There are few guidelines to draw upon. The World Health Organisation is seeking ways to better support private sector actors so that they can be an effective part of the COVID-19 response and continue to provide care for other illnesses. Their work is stymied by a lack of evidence. This project is part of a long standing collaboration between researchers in Uganda, UK and Denmark. It will build on recent research in the retail sector to rapidly create and disseminate new evidence on: the impact of current policies (including lockdown and curfew) on the MRS and community access to treatment; the ways in which members of the MRS are willing to be involved in COVID-19 public health response (health education, testing, surveillance); and what this would cost to scale up in the country.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-MR_V035592_1

Start Date:

2020-11-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£326,451.14




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