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Land Degradation Neutrality Fund

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

The LDN Fund invests in projects which reduce or reverse land degradation and thereby contribute to ‘Land Degradation Neutrality’. The LDN Fund is co-promoted by the Global Mechanism of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) and Mirova. It is a public-private partnership using public money to increase private sector investment in sustainable development. The fund invests in sustainable agriculture, forestry and other land uses globally. The Fund was launched at the UNCCD’s COP 13 in China in 2017.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-PO009-LDN

Start Date:

2019-12-12

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£10,000,000


Royal Academy of Engineering Academies Collective Fund: Resilient Futures - Frontiers of Development

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Frontiers of Development is part of the Joint Resilient Futures Initiative which is a collaboration between all four UK Academies under the GCRF. The aim of the JRF initiative is to construct a pipeline in the UK and the developing world for interdisciplinary researchers focused on tackling development challenges in a sustainable manner.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-RAENG-GCRF-08

Start Date:

2017-10-24

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,412,850.85


Royal Academy of Engineering Core - Engineering a Better World

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Engineering a Better World is a unique programme focused on achieving sustainable development, through innovative, collaborative, challenge-led engineering. COVID-19

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-RAENG-GCRF-04

Start Date:

2019-09-16

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,338,436


Royal Academy of Engineering Core - Frontiers of Engineering for Development

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Frontiers of Engineering for Development is a series of interdisciplinary symposia that facilitates national and international collaboration to tackle global development challenges. The event brings together a select group of around 60 emerging UK and global engineering and international development leaders from industry and academia to discuss pioneering technical work and cutting-edge research for international development from a diversity of engineering fields. Seed funding is available to progress some of the best ideas coming out of the event. COVID-19

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-RAENG-GCRF-07

Start Date:

2016-12-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£2,028,324.76


Royal Academy of Engineering Coherence & Impact - Frontiers Follow-on Funding

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

These mid-sized grants build on previously funded projects, helping them to scale up previous activities into fully formed research projects that tackle global challenges. COVID-19

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-GCRF-CImFFF

Start Date:

2020-10-27

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£3,297,764


Vivid Peru: Remote mapping and socio-economic valuation tool to support planning and implementation in land-use interventions in Peru

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The project addresses two of Peru’s most acute development challenges: reducing the rural population in poverty (currently 3 million), and preventing deforestation from its current rate of 250,000 hectares per year. The two challenges are closely linked in a number of ways. Unregulated land use is a major cause of both, facilitating encroachment on forests by the subsistence farmers who are responsible for 75% of losses, while also stemming flows of investment that could improve their productivity and incomes. However, solutions to the problems often require balancing trade-offs between them: for example, new infrastructure that can improve livelihoods might also accelerate deforestation. The overall objective of this project is to contribute to efforts to reduce poverty and protect forests by developing satellite-based data tools that help policymakers to understand and address these linkages. The tools developed by the project, and the engagement with government in the adoption and application of the tools, will assist decision-making in four key areas of policy activity: land use (‘zoning’) regulation; infrastructure provision; land permitting; and sustainable production and irrigation. The project tools support this aim by providing three layers of information: • Land use inventory that classifies and differentiates physical surface cover types. • Economic-ecosystem valuation tool that improves zoning rules and regulations, prioritises planned investments, and focuses enforcement and incentive mechanisms to improve effectiveness. This will integrate the land-use inventory with other economic information to map the value of land under different uses and the risk land faces of unauthorised exploitation. • Plot-level mapping and technical specifications to improve titling, enforcement of land-use rules, supporting programmes and technical assistance. This will map areas identified as high-risk in greater detail using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) surveys, providing information on forest thinning needed to enforce restrictions on deforestation and support certification of sustainable production.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-GCRF-UKSA_PE_UKSA-048

Start Date:

2016-11-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,382,266.42


PDE - 2019 - research translation – Creation of a Scientific Advisory group

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

It will provide intelligence and scientific advice to institutions responsible for public policy and technological transfer-absorption to the private sector in order to ensure sustainable transformation of the socio-economic reality of Peruvian citizens during their life cycle. SDGs: 8,9,10,17

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-NEWT-BC_PER_9

Start Date:

2019-10-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£44,953.10


EO4 Cultivar

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Earth observation (EO) can provide timely field-scale crop observations into the high value Latin American agricultural market. However, whilst there are sources of free and commercial satellite imagery, there isn’t the capability to process and rapidly deliver the necessary crop observation data to growers and advisory services in Latin America. EO4cultivar addresses this gap. Working with commercial and government stakeholders in Colombia, Peru and Paraguay EO4cultivar is developing a subscription service called Agri-track; a suite of crop monitoring and forecasting products. Near real-time metrics for use in crop production, agronomy and business intelligence are automatically generated at field scale. This includes metrics for predicting and monitoring growth stage, harvest timing and yield potential for growing conditions and identifying crop health problems. This information might be for individual fields, multiple farms, regional or national areas and reflects the demand for timely decision support tools to improve crop production, strategic analysis, sustainable farming practices and risk management. Case studies provide new information describing agricultural landscapes. Web-based maps enable local stakeholders to view the ecosystems services provided by land (e.g. water regulation). Opportunities for nature-based land management interventions to support sustainable agricultural production and biodiversity conservation are identified. Three fully funded PhDs at UK Universities provide capacity building for Latin American students from partner countries to develop their remote sensing skills and generate new knowledge from earth observation satellites. Project objectives: • Help key growers in Peru and Colombia to improve yield. • Provision of crop information services to make the supply chain more resilient. • Improve the way Peru and Colombia undertake sustainable farming practices. • Capacity building and continued innovation from EO by supporting 3 PhDs.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-GCRF-UKSA_PE_UKSA-036

Start Date:

2017-03-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,959,703.45


DAMSAT: DAm Monitoring from SATellites

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Water storage dams serve multiple functions for a society such as drinking water supply, flood protection, and hydroelectricity generation, among others. Tailings dams are embankments of compacted earth used to store toxic mining waste. The likelihood of failure of tailings dams is higher than that of water storage dams although, in both, the consequences of failures are catastrophic for communities and ecosystems downstream, which can cause loss of numerous lives, destruction of infrastructure, pollution of the environment, drinking water sources and the food chain. There is a need for a cost effective service to monitor dams and other tailings deposits, especially those in remote locations, to help reduce the risks of potentially catastrophic failures. Through developing a monitoring system the projects aims: • to provide an operational system to support early decision making that reduces the economic, social and environmental impacts downstream of potential failures of water storage dams, tailings dams and other tailings deposit areas in specific sites in the regions of Cajamarca and Pasco; • promote greater awareness of risks in remote areas, helping prioritise the use of resources and promoting coordination between the different organisations involved; • support the establishment of advanced monitoring techniques based on geospatial information. The project supports the reduction of damage to population and ecosystem services downstream of dam infrastructure upon which many vulnerable communities rely for both their source of water and their livelihoods.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-GCRF-UKSA_PE_UKSA-22

Start Date:

2018-03-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£3,297,217.41


British Academy Coherence & Impact - Early Careers Research Network

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

This programme of activities is tailored for early career researchers in the UK and the Global South to develop research partnerships, strengthen capacity and build research skills related to joint UK-Global South research agendas.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-GCRF-BACImECRN

Start Date:

2019-10-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£4,521,968


Leaders in Innovation Fellowships Programme v5, 6, 7 2018-21

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The Leaders in Innovation Fellowships programme builds technology entrepreneurship capacity of select partner country researchers who are developing a business proposition for their innovation which must meet a development challenge. Selected researchers benefit from focussed short term training and long term support through access to expert mentors and international networks.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-NEWT-RAE_PER_798

Start Date:

2018-10-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£755,977.91


Newton Fund Impact Scheme Peru 2020

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Grants supporting impact realisation

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-NF-BCPENFIS--NFIS-2020

Start Date:

2021-01-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£71,900.83


PDE – 2019 - research translation -Technical Assistance Botanical Garden

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Analyse the purpose of a Botanical Garden since it was identified as a priority for the country to preserve its biodiversity in the midst of climate change. Research will include structure and funding requirements to support the process of decision making. SDGs: 9,11,13,15. UK benefit: Biodiversity research and food security.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-NEWT-BC_PER_11

Start Date:

2019-10-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£56,550.68


STAMINA: Strategies to Mitigate Nutritional Risks among mothers and infants under 2 years in low income urban households in Peru during COVID-19

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Peru's progress in combatting malnutrition may be reversed with the current COVID-19 pandemic which has caused disruption of maternal and infant nutrition services, closure of health centres and rising unemployment. Peru has experienced one of the highest mortality rates from COVID-19 in South America. Deteriorations in infant nutrition will lead to poorer health outcomes for the next generation. Government and community stakeholders in Peru have highlighted the unknown impacts of the pandemic on the nutrition of mothers and their infants and young children. This study will examine how the COVID-19 response is impacting on the nutritional risks of mothers and infants (aged 0-23 months) within the household setting in low-income areas of two cities, Huánuco and Lima. This information will be compared with detailed nutritional assessments conducted in the same communities immediately before the national State of Emergency due to COVID-19. To address the emerging nutritional risks, we will work with stakeholders to co-create adapted methods for the delivery of nutritional services including iron supplementation and support for exclusive and continued breastfeeding. We will identify the nutritional risks resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic by examining short, medium and longer term changes in: - exclusive breastfeeding rates for infants aged 0-6 months; continued breastfeeding for infants aged 6-23 months, and the extent to which WHO recommended complementary feeding practices are being met. - the uptake of iron supplementation in infants and young children - a national priority to combat anaemia - in the context of the disrupted health services and new delivery strategies implemented since the pandemic. - household food security, maternal psychological wellbeing, and changing quality of diet in relation to nutritional risks of undernutrition as well as overweight and obesity at the household level. - how household dietary practices adapt and respond to the ongoing pandemic. With these insights, we will co-create support systems for the design or adapted delivery of nutritional counselling, growth monitoring and iron supplementation for infants and young children using information and communication technologies or socially-distanced health services. We will work with UNICEF Peru as a project partner in order to ensure that efforts to address malnutrition target the most vulnerable groups and are tailored to the challenges experienced by urban communities which make up the majority population of Peru.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-EP_V034057_1

Start Date:

2020-09-16

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£216,186.35


GCRF_NF516 Increasing resilience in fishing communities to impacts of COVID-19 in northern Peru

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Peru is one the world's worst COVID affected countries. Gaps in social welfare, poor infrastucture and living conditions and high levels of informal employment exacerbate the impact of this disease. Artisanal fisheries are an important and overlooked activity which provides employment and basic nutrition for some of the poorest in rural areas. Thousands of jobs in the seadood supply chain are affected by the pandemic. In the Piura region, the impact on fishing communities is expected to be higher due to the large number of people involved in fisheries-dependent activities and the lack of alternative economic opportunities. There has been no systematic effort to document the impact of COVID on these communities. The Regional Government has identified a need for this information in order to respond with appropiate social welfare measures and is leading an Inter-Agency Consortium (IAC) to re-establish artisanal fisheries activities. This project will support the IAC by collecting and disseminating data on the impact of COVID in fishing communities. It will assess key fisheries, rigorously estimate the impact of the pandemic througout the supply chain and look at the way that this has, or needs to adapt to become more resilient. Throught the timely provision of relevant socio-economic information through a virtual online platform, this project will support decision-making by fishers, government and society in general, By engaging stakeholders in affected communities the project will develop recommendations for a sustained re-activation of fishing and associated activities.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-EP_V042947_1

Start Date:

2020-10-27

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£297,162.88


CASCADA: Toxin or Treat?

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Research programme which aims to provide an improved understanding of the rate of glacial retreat in Peru and the impact of this on water security and natural hazards

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-NE_S013237_2

Start Date:

2019-11-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£48,703.81


Integrated upstream and downstream thinking to mitigate water security challenges from Peruvian glacier retreat

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Acceleration of glacial melt has severe implications for water-food-energy security and inter-connected livelihoods of vulnerable populations in river basins fed by glaciers. For example, in the Ancash Region of Peru, glacial melt from the Andean Mountains provides up to 67% of dry season water supply going up to 91% during extreme drought (annual average 19%). Rapid retreat of glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca has already had notable impact on that supply, with evidence to suggest the majority of rivers now exhibit decreasing dry-season discharge i.e. have reached and passed 'peak water'. Challenges associated with a reduced supply of water to downstream agriculture, industry and hydropower generation are exacerbated by enhanced sediment and contaminant flux in extreme wet season floods. Climate change impacts compromise ecosystem service provision at times of both augmented low and high flow. While low flows and water supply are being increasingly impacted by the huge loss of water storage in shrinking glaciers, ENSO-related extreme events are leading to catastrophic delivery of excess water and sediment during high flows which compromise water and environmental quality downstream. Climate change is driving a hydrological regime of extremes with no advantage at either end: from supply and quality issues at low flow to more water than the system can handle at high flow, compromising water and soil quality downstream. Understanding the changing dynamics of glacial melt, hydrology and regional climate change is crucial in order for the design of infrastructure solutions and planning to be effective and resilient. Responsible, efficient and sustainable water use is necessary in national and transboundary watersheds, to ensure adequate supply and mitigate emerging quality problems. In order to achieve this consultancies and advisory organisations require high quality robust scientific evidence to underpin their design decisions for watershed management. This entails moving from (inefficient) sectorial management of water to a more integrated and holistic approach that takes into account the need for conserving ecosystems services. Indeed, while the Peruvian Congress passed a historic Ecosystem Services law in 2014 to take a holistic approach to tackling these challenges, implementation of integrated action to achieve Sustainable Development Goals has been hampered by a lack of evidence of glacial-fed watershed processes and function. While studies to date have been conducted in the Cordillera Blanca in relation to dynamics of glacial retreat, associated natural disaster risk, hydrology and past glaciations we do not have a sufficiently holistic and integrated knowledge of the wider impacts of glacial melt on current and future ecosystem service provision which is hampered by complexity of human-environment feedbacks, a knowledge base essential for mitigation of future uncertainty and risks. We propose that a basin-wide understanding of water, sediment and contaminant budgets within Peruvian glacial-fed basins is required to bring policy change for socio-economic benefits through (a) offsetting storage lost from shrinking glaciers through augmentation of mountain ecosystem service provision for landscape water retention and (b) providing the foundation for adaptive management strategies to support and enhance livelihoods under threat from high flows and downstream environmental quality consequences. This research is essential for the design of large-scale energy infrastructure, such as hydropower in glacier-fed regions. Likewise, bringing back and maintaining a balance between sustainable livelihoods and the environment is critical to build community resilience to environmental change.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-NE_S013245_1

Start Date:

2019-02-10

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£366,568.52


Peruvian Glacier Retreat and its Impact on Water Security (Peru GROWS)

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Meltwater from glaciers in the Peruvian Andes provides an important and reliable water supply for local and downstream communities for domestic purposes, hydropower, subsistence and commercial agriculture, and industry; and to support rare, high-elevation wetlands and wider ecosystem functioning. However, this long-term, reliable water supply is threatened by increasing temperatures and changing precipitation patterns in the mountainous areas, resulting in shrinking of glaciers and changes in the amount and seasonality of meltwater runoff. A warming climate is also associated with an increasing frequency of extreme hydrological events, such as floods and droughts. Coupled with the stresses of Peru's rapid urbanisation and economic development, these changes are expected to lead to significant water scarcity, with the potential to inhibit economic growth and degrade vulnerable ecosystems (and the services they provide), which in turn will increase social vulnerability, adversely affect the equitable sharing of resources, increase social conflicts, and destabilise Peruvian societies (from local communities to the large coastal urban centres). Peru GROWS aims to increase the resilience of Peruvian communities and ecosystems to hydrological changes arising from shrinking glaciers in the Andes. Working in the Rio Santa catchment - the most glacierised catchment of Peru - we will map the current socio-ecological system to identify where, and how, different communities and ecosystems are exposed to risks from water availability. We will then integrate field measurements and remote-sensing data into physically-based glacier and hydrological models, to simulate the past, present, and possible future changes (to the end of the twenty-first century) to the climate, the glaciers, and to river flows (including amounts, seasonality, and inter-annual variability). In close partnership with local stakeholders, we will exploit this new knowledge to explore the direct and indirect impacts of projected change in glacier behaviour on different communities in the catchment, with a focus on food security, aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, and energy production. We will provide information on the current state of the water balance and hotspots of potential water scarcity/trade-offs that can be easily understood by key stakeholders and will provide the basis for adaptation planning at local and regional level. Key stakeholders and end-users have been closely involved in the design of Peru GROWS and will co-deliver the research. Two key NGOs, with a long history of work in this region (CARE and the Mountain Institute) as well as social scientists at the National Glacier and Mountainous Ecosystems Research Institute and the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru, will act as an interface with the local stakeholders, especially vulnerable rural communities. Together, they will have a key role in co-designing appropriate adaptation strategies for water resources management and agriculture that will create lasting positive impact. With this, we lay a firm foundation from which multiple impacts can emerge during and after the project.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-NE_S013296_1

Start Date:

2019-02-10

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£405,124.63


CASCADA - Toxin or Treat?

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The most sensitive glaciers to climate warming in the 21st century are situated in tropical mountain regions, and thus, serve as valuable sentinels of climate change. Most attention to date has focused on the quantity of meltwater released from these glaciers, because of the impact on global sea level and water security. The concurrent changes in water quality are much more poorly constrained, but have implications for drinking water, agriculture and industry. Peru holds 71% of all tropical glaciers, all of which have undergone high rates of mass loss and retreat in the last two decades. However, certain rivers fed by glacial meltwater are becoming acidic, with concentrations of metals often above World Health Organisation standards. This is thought due to the exposure of metal-rich (sulphidic) rocks in retreating glacier forefields, which release sulphuric acid and metals once oxidised - this acidity can no longer be neutralized by the intense chemical weathering which takes place beneath glaciers. The overarching hypothesis that CASCADA will test is that glaciated catchments in the Cordillera Blanca are evolving along a trajectory from pristine conditions, where glacial runoff is an important nutrient source for downstream ecosystems (""treat""), to those in which the same runoff is toxic to ecosystems and human health (""toxin""). CASCADA unites Peruvian experts in water resources, glaciology and ecology with UK geochemists, glaciologists and technologists to investigate and generate solutions to the cascading impacts of glacier retreat on water quality in Cordillera Blanca rivers. It employs cutting edge in situ monitoring technologies to capture first time data on the year-round quality of Cordillera Blanca rivers and to develop and test a novel wetland management model to remediate rivers with high metal toxicity. A strong partnership with local water users' committees under a citizen science scheme and the formation of an engagement board with governmental institutions and local communities will ensure capacity building and the transfer of technology for integrated wetland management and water quality reporting. Thus, CASCADA provides the transformative process understanding required to deliver a step jump in our ability to predict water quality evolution in deglaciating terrains and to develop effective solutions to toxic catchments.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-NE_S013288_1

Start Date:

2019-02-10

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£439,965.37


Integrated upstream and downstream thinking to mitigate water security challenges from Peruvian glacier retreat

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Integrated upstream and downstream thinking to mitigate water security challenges from Peruvian glacier retreat

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-NE_S013253_1

Start Date:

2019-02-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£40,901.10




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