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FCDO ODA allocations for 2021/22 were announced on 21 April 2021. Changes to individual programmes are underway. The information on this website may not reflect the latest allocated budgets for this year. This information will be updated in due course.

UK aid from the British people

Nigeria

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Nigeria Delta & Maritime Security and Stability Programme

Conflict, Stability and Security Fund

This programme aims to encourage and support Nigerian decision makers to address the prominent issues of instability in the Niger Delta and the Gulf of Guinea by supporting research and pilot projects to deepen understanding in the Niger Delta on security and governance, economic diversification, oil theft and illegal refining, and environmental clean-up. Training and operational capacity building for the Nigerian Navy to develop operational capability and the institutions to deliver improved security in Nigeria’s territorial waters and the Gulf of Guinea. This will promote the importance of operating in accordance with maritime and domestic law, International Humanitarian Law and the Law of Armed Conflict. This is an ODA and non-ODA integrated programme. The spend reported against this programme is the ODA element alone.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-52-CSSF-03-000022

Start Date:

2018-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£900,000


North East Nigeria Security and Conflict and Stabilisation Programme

Conflict, Stability and Security Fund

This programme aims to respond to interrelated issues in the northeast of Nigeria. By supporting the Nigerian Police Force and other security and justice actors in their efforts to protect civilians and uphold the rule of law in areas recently recovered from insurgent groups and to allow displaced people and former insurgent group fighters to return to their communities. This is an ODA and non-ODA integrated programme. The spend reported against this programme is the ODA element alone.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-52-CSSF-03-000008

Start Date:

2017-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£5,800,000


Nigeria Security & Justice Reform Programme

Conflict, Stability and Security Fund

This programme will deliver defence, security and justice priorities in Nigeria through three interconnected components: (1) Strengthening security and justice accountability through the media. (2) Democratic Oversight and Accountability of the Nigerian Security Sector. (3) Strategic assistance to the Nigerian Police Force (NPF).

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-52-CSSF-03-000007

Start Date:

2017-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£5,200,000


Nigeria Countering Organised Crime and Corruption

Conflict, Stability and Security Fund

This programme aims to strengthen local law enforcement capability building and border integrity by supporting the development of the Joint Border Task Force and to build on existing strong relationships with Nigerian law enforcement to deliver capacity building in the management of kidnap cases.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-52-CSSF-03-000006

Start Date:

2018-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£2,700,000


Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund Round 6

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

Illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is the fifth most lucrative transnational crime, worth up to £17bn a year globally. As well as threatening species with extinction, IWT destroys vital ecosystems. IWT also fosters corruption, feeds insecurity, and undermines good governance and the rule of law. The UK government is committed to tackling illegal trade of wildlife products. Defra manages the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, which is a competitive grants scheme with the objective of tackling illegal wildlife trade and, in doing so, contributing to sustainable development in developing countries. Projects funded under the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund address one, or more, of the following themes: • Developing sustainable livelihoods to benefit people directly affected by IWT • Strengthening law enforcement • Ensuring effective legal frameworks • Reducing demand for IWT products Over £26 million has been committed to 85 projects since the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund was established in 2013; five projects were awarded in 2014 (via applications to the Darwin Initiative), fourteen in 2015, fifteen in 2016, thirteen in 2017, fourteen in 2018 and thirteen in 2019 and ten in the latest round in 2020. (more info here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/919053/iwt-challenge-fund-list.pdf): IWT076, IWT077, IWT078, IWT082, IWT083, IWT079, IWT080, IWT081, IWT084, IWT085

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-IWTCF-R6

Start Date:

2020-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£3,417,064


Darwin Initiative Round 26

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

The Darwin Initiative is a UK government grants scheme that helps to protect biodiversity and the natural environment through locally based projects worldwide. The initiative funds projects that help countries rich in biodiversity but poor in financial resources to meet their objectives under one or more of the biodiversity conventions. The objective is to to address threats to biodiversity such as: - habitat loss or degradation - climate change - invasive species - over-exploitation - pollution and eutrophication

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-DAR26

Start Date:

2020-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£5,607,898


Darwin Initiative Round 23

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

The Darwin Initiative is a UK government grants scheme that helps to protect biodiversity and the natural environment through locally based projects worldwide. The initiative funds projects that help countries rich in biodiversity but poor in financial resources to meet their objectives under one or more of the biodiversity conventions. The objective is to to address threats to biodiversity such as: - habitat loss or degradation - climate change - invasive species - over-exploitation - pollution and eutrophication.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-DAR23

Start Date:

2018-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£7,619,619


Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund Round 3

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

Illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is the fifth most lucrative transnational crime, worth up to £17bn a year globally. As well as threatening species with extinction, IWT destroys vital ecosystems. IWT also fosters corruption, feeds insecurity, and undermines good governance and the rule of law. The UK government is committed to tackling illegal trade of wildlife products. Defra manages the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, which is a competitive grants scheme with the objective of tackling illegal wildlife trade and, in doing so, contributing to sustainable development in developing countries. Projects funded under the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund address one, or more, of the following themes: • Developing sustainable livelihoods to benefit people directly affected by IWT • Strengthening law enforcement • Ensuring effective legal frameworks • Reducing demand for IWT products Over £23 million has been committed to 75 projects since the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund was established in 2013; five projects were awarded in 2014 (via applications to the Darwin Initiative), fourteen in 2015, fifteen in 2016, thirteen in 2017, fourteen in 2018 and in the latest round in 2019. This round of funding includes the following projects (details of which can be found at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/811381/iwt-project-list-2019.pdf). The projects that a relevant for this area are IWT035 to IWT047.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-IWTCF-R3

Start Date:

2017-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£4,123,118


Azura Power

CDC Group plc

Debt investment to increase the generation of electricity and tackle the chronic shortage of power in Nigeria.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F308501

Start Date:

2014-11-24

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


Indorama Eleme Fertilizer & Chemicals Limited

CDC Group plc

A debt investment by CDC to Indorama Eleme Fertilizer & Chemicals Limited. The loan will fund a project to build and operate a fertilizer production facility. As well as being a major job creator in the region, the investment aims to contribute to improved farm yields and agricultural productivity, which are critical to Nigeria’s long- term food security.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F304901

Start Date:

2013-02-18

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


INT Towers

CDC Group plc

Debt investment for the development of telecommunications towers to improve coverage, including in the northern region.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F309301

Start Date:

2015-02-20

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


Fleming Fund – Country and Regional Grants and Fellowships Programme

UK - Department of Health (DH)

The Fleming Fund helps low- and middle-income countries to fight antimicrobial resistance. A management agent has been appointed to deliver: country grants 24 low- and middle-income countries, regional grants in West Africa, East and Southern Africa, South Asia and South East Asia, and a global fellowships programme. These initiatives aim to improve laboratory capacity and diagnosis as well as data and surveillance of antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-10-FF_MA

Start Date:

2016-10-10

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£258,497,532.75


Strengthening Peace in Nigeria - SPIN

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

SPiN aims to tackle one of the key upstream drivers of natural resource conflict, including the inadequacy of Nigeria’s conflict, security and justice mechanisms to mitigate and respond to such conflicts. In doing so, it will also engage with number of other pertinent factors, including the prevalence of divisive narratives, the broken social contract between citizens and the state, and the impact of poor natural resource management. Overall, it will aim to support greater stability in northern Nigeria.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-1-300203

Start Date:

Activity Status:

Pipeline/identification

Total Budget:

£300,000


REACH - Supporting economic development in conflict and climate affected regions in Nigeria.

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

To improve resilience in rural livelihoods in Nigeria. It will build on tried and tested agricultural market interventions with a view to taking these to scale; and exploit new innovations that help side-step traditional barriers to agricultural markets

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-1-300826

Start Date:

Activity Status:

Pipeline/identification

Total Budget:

£200,000


Tackling Malaria Diagnosis in sub-Saharan Africa with Fast, Accurate and Scalable Robotic Automation, Computer Vision and Machine Learning (FASt-Mal)

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Malaria affect about 300 million people worldwide leading to around one million deaths each year. Up to eighty-five percent of the cases occur in sub-Saharan Africa with about 90% mortality in the under five years-of-age group due to severe malaria syndromes. Control of malaria remains a major public health issue in sub-Saharan Africa developing countries. A quarter of the global malaria cases and a third of malaria-attributable childhood deaths occur in the most populous country of Africa, Nigeria (160M inhabitants) and indicates the importance of the problem. Accurate malaria diagnosis relies on the recognition of clinical parameters and more importantly in the microscopic detection of malarial parasites, parasitised red-blood-cells in peripheral-blood films. Malaria parasite detection and counting by human-operated optical microscopy is the current ""gold standard"" and despite its major severe drawbacks, other non-microscopic methodologies have not been able to outperform it. Presumptive treatment for malaria (without microscopic confirmation) is wasteful of drugs and ineffective if the diagnosis was wrong, a drain on often precious health resources, fuels antimalarial resistance and have made control and elimination interventions unachievable. We aim to create and test in real-world conditions a fast, accurate and scalable malaria diagnosis system by replacing human-expert optical-microscopy with a robotic automated computer-expert system FASt-MalPrototype that assesses similar digital-optical-microscopy representations of the problem. The system aims to provide access to effective malaria diagnosis, a challenge that is faced by all developing countries where malaria is endemic.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-EP_P028608_1

Start Date:

2017-05-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,330,515


Enabling Clinical Decisions From Low-power MRI In Developing Nations Through Image Quality Transfer

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The long-term vision motivating this project is of software solutions that enable low-power cheap-and-sustainable imaging devices able to provide point-of-care image data in resource-poor locations at diagnostic/prognostic quality. We achieve this by propagating information from databases of high quality images. We provide a proof of concept using MRI from lower-power scanners available in LMICs, specifically Nigeria, that we enhance by propagating information from databases of images from state-of-the-art MRI scanners available in the UK. We focus on an application to childhood epilepsy to demonstrate early clinical benefit. Childhood epilepsy presents an immediate clinical need in LMICs, as MRI from widely available 0.36T scanners is insufficient to support clinical decisions on curative surgery that are routinely made in the UK using 1.5T or 3T images. This leaves many patients untreated, living with severe epilepsy and resulting physical disabilities and mental disorders, unable to work effectively, and draining sparse medical and social-care resources. We draw on the latest advances in machine learning to approximate the MRIs available in the UK from those accessible in the paediatric neurology clinic in UCH Ibadan, Nigeria - a typical sub-Saharan city hospital. Machine learning has made major advances over the last few years. In particular, it shows remarkable feats of artificial intelligence in data-rich application areas such as computer vision where, for example, computers now outperform humans in object recognition. The advances are just starting to make an impact in medical imaging, which presents unique challenges because a) less data is available than many non-medical computer vision tasks, b) decisions are often more critical as they impact directly on patient outcome. Our recent image quality transfer (IQT) framework propagates information from high quality to low quality medical images. It shows compelling early results, such as revealing thin white matter pathways, usually only accessible from specialist high resolution data sets, from standard resolution images acquired on a clinical scanner. Here we advance IQT to exploit the latest machine learning techniques, enhance those techniques to provide confidence measures valuable for medical decision-making, and tailor solutions specifically to enhance images from the Ibadan paediatric clinic with those from similar cohorts in the UK. We acquire and collate the data sets sufficient to support learning the required image-to-image mappings. Matched pairs of images from the same subjects from UK and Nigerian scanners are not practical to obtain, so we employ unsupervised and semi-supervised learning to construct image-to-image mappings without directly matching training data. We refine promising implementations and assess their impact on clinical decision making in a pilot study in Ibadan using locally agreed metrics. We intend this project as a springboard for a much wider and long term program exploring these ideas to bring about a paradigm shift in imaging that deploys cheap point-of-care devices built specifically to acquire data enhanced by databases of high quality images acquired on state of the art or bespoke devices.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-EP_R014019_1

Start Date:

2018-02-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,035,545.02


GLTEN Africa: Cropping system diversity, a cornerstone of sustainable intensification.

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The former Director General of the United Nations, Kofi Annan, has called for a 'uniquely African Green Revolution'. Implicit in this statement is the acknowledgement that the first Green Revolution that provided the template for the modern intensive agriculture and that dominates landscapes in Europe, much of Asia and North America may not be sustainable in the long term. This first Green Revolution that began in the 1960s, was based on the breeding of high yielding varieties of a few crops coupled with high inputs of fertilisers and crop protection products. An emerging problem with this way of farming is that the heavy reliance on inorganic fertilisers and chemical pesticides results in 'open leaky' systems with impacts on the environment including diffuse pollution and losses of biodiversity. There is also evidence that these systems may not be sustainable from a farming perspective as the health of soils declines and pests, weeds and diseases evolve resistance to pesticides. In contrast, large areas of Sub-Saharan Africa are still cropped on a much smaller scale with lower inputs and a greater diversity of crops but with much lower productivity. It can be argued, therefore that the UK and Sub-Saharan Africa are at opposite ends of the intensification spectrum but both are unsustainable (either in terms of food production or the environment). We expect that a more diverse system in terms of the number of different crops grown and variety of crop management practices used will provide food and nutrition more sustainably because different crops will be more or less affected by variability in the weather between years. Because, there are differences in how crops use nutrients from the soil, a more diverse mixture of crops would also be expected to be more efficient and reduce impacts on the environment. We will study the importance of the existing diversity in cropping systems in Sub-Saharan Africa. By doing this, we will be able to recommend ways of increasing production that retains the right level of crop and management diversity to ensure the systems are resilient. To quantify the value of diversity of cropping systems in Africa, we will use data from Long Term Experiments (LTEs) that have been running over several decades in Africa and the UK. These experiments will be used to compare how farming in different ways over many years contributes to sustainability in terms of the health of the soil, stability of food supply and use of natural resources. When considering ideas such as 'sustainability' or 'resilience' it is important to have experiments like these that do not just look at short term effects of a change of practice but are able to capture effects that are only evident over the medium to long term - as is the case for the impact of management on soil health. The results of the work on the LTEs will be combined with a survey of farms in four regions in Sub-Saharan Africa (N-Nigeria, Eastern Rwanda, parts of Malawi and Western Kenya) to collect data on the existing variety in the types of crops and ways they are grown. We will particularly interested in the local use of crops that are not grown on a wide scale. By combining this information with what we have learnt from the LTEs about the relationship between cropping system diversity and sustainability, we will be able to compare the different systems and identify the ones that strike the best balance between providing food and protecting the environment. This work will be supported by computer models that are able to predict how potentially novel combinations would deliver food and environemntal benefits.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-BB_R020663_1

Start Date:

2018-07-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£621,377.77


Mechanisms and genetics of iron toxicity tolerance in African rice

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Rice is a major staple food across sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and demand for rice is increasing rapidly with changes in consumer preferences and urbanization. However, domestic production currently accounts for only about 60% of consumption; imports to SSA amount to a third of the global rice trade. Accordingly there are various national and international initiatives with ambitious plans for increasing production across SSA. There are ample agro-climatically suitable wetlands in inland valleys and elsewhere to support a large intensification and expansion of rice area. During the rainy season, rice is the only possible crop on low-lying wetlands, so it does not compete with other crops for land or water. However, besides agricultural production, i.e. mainly rice-based systems including fish, vegetable, fruit and livestock production, inland valleys also provide local communities with forest, forage, hunting and fishing resources and they are important for water buffering and as biodiversity hot spots. Development for agricultural production must be done in such a way as to avoid compromising these locally- and regionally-important ecosystem services. This will require improved rice germplasm and nutrient and water management suited to these systems, so as to minimise the land area required. It will also require technologies for assessing which areas across SSA are best suited to intensification and expansion of rice-based farming, without compromising other ecosystem goods and services. It is estimated that with realistic improvements in germplasm and management, less than 10% of the total inland valley area in SSA would be sufficient to meet the total demand for rice in Africa. But various biophysical constraints need to be overcome; one of the most important is the soil health problem iron (Fe) toxicity. Iron toxicity is a set of severely yield-limiting disorders associated with high concentrations of reduced ferrous iron (Fe(II)) in flooded paddy soils. It is exclusively a problem of paddy rice, linked to the biogeochemistry of flooded, anaerobic soil. It is a particular problem in African rice systems because of the nature of the soils, which are highly weathered, nutrient-depleted and rich in Fe oxides, in contrast to the young alluvial rice soils of the Asian lowlands. It affects a large part of the existing and potential rice area in SSA (estimates vary from 20-60% of the area) and causes large yield losses (up to 90%). There are currently efforts to exploit tolerance of it in the indigenous African rice germplasm in breeding and management programmes at AfricaRice and elsewhere. But this is constrained by the complexity of the disorder and by poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms and genetics of tolerance, which reflects its relative unimportance in Asian rice systems where most rice research has been focused. We propose to provide the bioscience and tools required to (a) elucidate the mechanisms and genetics of tolerance to Fe toxicity in indigenous African germplasm, in support of rice breeding and management programmes, and (b) assess the potential of improved germplasm and management to raise the productivity of existing and new rice-based farming systems across SSA. We will especially focus on Oryza glaberrima ('African' rice) species, indigenous to W Africa, and sub-species of Oryza sativa ('Asian' rice) indigenous to Madagascar. We will use a combination of soil chemistry, plant physiology and molecular genetics approaches with field work in W Africa and Madagascar, supported by controlled-environment and laboratory work in the UK. We will also map the spatial extent of different types of Fe toxicity in existing and potential rice areas across SSA, and we will develop GIS tools for assessing the potential for improved germplasm and nutrient and water management to raise the productivity of rice-based farming systems in these areas.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-BB_R020388_1

Start Date:

2018-07-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£684,027.08


Determinants of effectiveness of a novel community health workers programme in improving maternal and child health in Nigeria

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Improved mother and child health (MCH) continues to be an issue of international priority, particularly for sub-Saharan African countries. Evidence suggests that schemes involving Community Health Worker (CHWs) can be effective in improving the health of mothers and children. Although such schemes are implemented in some developing countries such as Bangladesh, to guide further developments, much better understanding is needed on what makes CHW programmes successful and under what circumstances. In Nigeria, despite significant improvements, mother and child health remains an issue of concern, particularly in rural areas where most vulnerable groups live. In 2012, the Federal Government of Nigeria established the Subsidy Reinvestment and Empowerment Programme (SURE-P) to invest the revenue from fuel subsidy reduction into a social security programme to improve lives of most vulnerable populations. One SURE-P component, implemented in selected facilities in each State, focuses on maternal and child health (SURE-P/MCH). The idea is that recruitment of CHWs, combined with infrastructure development, and improved availability of supplies and medicines, will improve access to quality health services, and ultimately, improve mother and child health. Since December 2012, Conditional Cash Transfers (CCT) have also been added at selected sites ('SURE-P/MCH+CCT'). These incentive payments to pregnant mothers are linked to use of health services at different stages: e.g. for antenatal care visits and facility deliveries. The AIM of this project is to inform strengthening and scaling up of community health worker (CHW) programmes. This will be achieved by investigating two implementations (i.e. with and without conditional cash transfers) of a Nigerian CHW programme, to understand what factors, under what conditions, promote equitable access to quality services, and improve maternal and child health outcomes. We will do so by: 1.Developing an in-depth understanding of the context and the process of implementation of the interventions, including relations between health workforce and infrastructure and supplies; 2.Identifying, assessing and comparing the intervention outputs (e.g. skills and practices of CHWs and efficiency of primary health care facilities) and outcomes (e.g. equitable access to quality MCH services and attainment of MCH outcome targets); 3.Developing an empirically-based and theoretically-grounded model of complex relations between the people involved, context, implementation process, outputs and outcomes of the interventions; 4.Developing transferable best practices for scalability (expansion within a broadly similar context) and generalizability (expansion to different contexts) of the interventions. This five-year research and development project will be implemented in two States in Nigeria - Niger State in the North and Anambra State in the South, which were selected in consultation with the Federal MOH and SURE-P national programme officer. Selecting two states from different parts of the country will provide an opportunity for different contextual factors that affect the implementation and outcome from the programme to be better elucidated and ensure that the findings are generalisable to the entire country. Within each State we will select three Local Government Areas (LGAs) clusters: one with SURE-P/MCH, one with SURE-P/MCH+CCT and one with no intervention. In each State the two interventions will be assessed against each other and against the comparison (i.e. no implementation) site. We will work closely with local, State and Federal policymakers and practitioners, to generate answers that can be used to inform their policy decisions. We expect that better understanding of performance of the CHW programme in Nigeria will inform further strengthening of the existing programme, its replication within Nigeria, and other similar countries considering the implementation of CHW initiatives.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-MR_M01472X_1

Start Date:

2015-06-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£794,948.39


Commercial Law Research Network Nigeria (CLRN_N)

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

CLRN_N is proposed to influence the future reform of commercial law in Nigeria, as well as to provide an ecosystem through which interdisciplinary research can be generated. It invites researchers to examine the effectiveness of commercial law reform in the global South, using Nigeria as a case study. Nigeria has sought to modernise its laws for many reasons, including meeting international standards, as well as promoting the development of its economy. Similar to its counterparts, the reforms have been achieved largely through transplants; with the common law of England and Wales being the main source of transplants because of the colonial history between both countries. It is important to consider the effectiveness of the reforms that have been made, particularly as critics of legal transplants argue that they tend to be ineffective where they do not address the realities of the recipients. (Pistor et. al., 2000) Transplants are a method through which laws diffuse across nations. Law does not diffuse only from the global north to the south. It generally diffuses across countries that are at par also. (Twinning, 2004). Thus, the problem is not diffusion; it is with the misfit where the local realities have not been duly considered and addressed. It is therefore important that countries from the global south articulate the realities that characterise their systems; thereafter creatively determine whether and/or how to adapt modern institutions to suit their contexts. To understand the commercial law realities of Nigeria, it is necessary that well-versed researchers interrogate the Nigerian context using inter-disciplinary research methods ranging from the theoretical to the empirical. They must critical examine the the historical, socio-economic and political contexts of the Nigerian commercial sphere. To ensure that the realities are appropriately understood and recommendations are rigorous enough to achieve their purpose, the network will also engender discussions between researchers and key stakeholders involved in the enactment and enforcement of the Nigerian commercial law through round-table discussions. Thereafter, a determination can be made about the effectiveness of reforms in each aspect of commercial law and recommendations made on the future direction of research and commercial law policy. This collaborative approach also ensures that there will be sustained dialogues with the stakeholder groups on the recommendations made. The outcomes will be relevant for Nigeria, as institutions in its commercial sphere will be rigorously assessed. They will also hold relevance beyond Nigeria. They are relevant to the debate on legal transplants which is of interest globally, as well as those interested in the development of the common law, as they show how its principles can be adapted to the context of countries from the global south. Finally, the network also provides a forum at which to develop the research emanating from the global south. Trubek (2014) has stated that one of the principal problems the global south faces in the quest for development is the inadequate quality of the research it generates. To improve on the rigour of research generated from a prominent country in the global south such as Nigeria, the network will organise workshops at which research methods are discussed and taught. The forum provided by the network will enable established researchers to discuss the possibility of collaborations, as well as the methods which are sophisticated enough to interrogate the realities of the global south with their peers. The network however places emphasis on the training of early career researchers, many of whom have been trained only on descriptive, black-letter analysis. These researchers will be enlightened on the value and utility of inter-disciplinary methods; the ultimate goal being to ensure that there will be an expansion of rigorous research emanating from the global south in the future

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-AH_S011455_1

Start Date:

2019-06-03

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£30,238.55




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