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FCDO ODA allocations for 2021/22 were announced on 21 April 2021. Changes to individual programmes are underway. The information on this website may not reflect the latest allocated budgets for this year. This information will be updated in due course.

UK aid from the British people

Ghana

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Modernisation of official statistics

Office for National Statistics

The programme provides high-quality technical assistance, mainly through experts from the UK Office for National Statistics, to build the capacity of statistical systems in developing countries. We have key partnerships with national statistical offices globally, primarily in Africa.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-24-001

Start Date:

2021-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£3,000,000


Land Degradation Neutrality Fund

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

The LDN Fund invests in projects which reduce or reverse land degradation and thereby contribute to ‘Land Degradation Neutrality’. The LDN Fund is co-promoted by the Global Mechanism of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) and Mirova. It is a public-private partnership using public money to increase private sector investment in sustainable development. The fund invests in sustainable agriculture, forestry and other land uses globally. The Fund was launched at the UNCCD’s COP 13 in China in 2017.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-PO009-LDN

Start Date:

2019-12-12

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£10,000,000


Establishing and enhancing veterinary surveillance of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and use in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs)

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

This project aims to help establish effective surveillance for longer term capacity building for AMR in the terrestrial and aquatic veterinary sectors in selected LMICs, and to enhance veterinary medicines regulatory training.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-VMD-AMR001

Start Date:

2019-09-16

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£400,000


Fleming Fund – Country and Regional Grants and Fellowships Programme

UK - Department of Health (DH)

The Fleming Fund helps low- and middle-income countries to fight antimicrobial resistance. A management agent has been appointed to deliver: country grants 24 low- and middle-income countries, regional grants in West Africa, East and Southern Africa, South Asia and South East Asia, and a global fellowships programme. These initiatives aim to improve laboratory capacity and diagnosis as well as data and surveillance of antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-10-FF_MA

Start Date:

2016-10-10

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£258,497,532.75


Amandi Energy

CDC Group plc

Debt investment by CDC into Amandi Energy for the development, construction and operation 192.4 MW combined cycle power plant to tackle Ghana's power shortage.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F314001

Start Date:

2016-10-31

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


Actis Sunrise Development Limited

CDC Group plc

An equity investment by CDC into Actis Sunrise Development Limited which is developing The Exchange - a mixed-use office, hotel, residential and retail precinct in Accra. The project will create additional direct and indirect employment during the construction and operational phases. It will also help increase business opportunities to local subcontractors, property service companies and suppliers of other goods and services.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F306301

Start Date:

2013-11-26

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


British Academy Coherence & Impact - Challenge-led grants: Urban Infrastructures of Well-being

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

This programme supports interdisciplinary research across the social and engineering sciences and the humanities looking to explore how formal and informal infrastructures interact to affect the well-being of people in cities across the Global South.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-GCRF-CImChlGUWB

Start Date:

2019-10-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£5,838,971


British Academy Coherence & Impact - Youth Futures

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The projects funded under this programme support research which brings a much-needed youth-led perspective on the UN’s 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda. They involve genuine interdisciplinarity, collaborative work that extends beyond the standard research model, and policy thinking based on close understanding of, and working with, young people at various stages of ‘getting by’.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-GCRF-CImYF

Start Date:

2020-01-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£5,760,000


British Academy Core - Challenge-led grants: Sustainable Development

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

This programme funds excellent, policy-oriented UK research, aimed at addressing the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and advancing the UK’s Aid Strategy. It supports researchers in the humanities and the social sciences working to generate evidence on the challenges and opportunities faced in developing countries and respond to the Sustainable Development Goals. The Academy is particularly keen to encourage applications from the humanities in this round.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-BA-GCRF-04

Start Date:

2016-12-31

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£8,895,000


British Academy Coherence & Impact - Challenge-led grants: Early Childhood Education

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The projects funded under this programme aim to provide critical knowledge to inform policy-making in the education and broader learning domain, while recognising the necessary interplay of education with health, nutrition, gender equality and other disciplines and sectors.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-GCRF-CImChlGECE

Start Date:

2019-10-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£4,321,513


Remediation of Cocoa Soils in Ghana as a Route to more Sustainable Cocoa Production

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Objectives The overall objective is to reverse declining soil health in small holder cocoa farms. For this, we will utilise our existing network to investigate the utilisation of situation appropriate organic amendments derived from on-farm waste products (pod husks and prunings) for soil improvement on cocoa farms, thereby contributing to more sustainable crop production and thus maintenance of livelihoods. The specific objectives are to:- 1. examine ways of optimising nutrient availability through the return of farm waste-based soil amendments (pod husks and prunings) to cocoa plantation soils. 2. determine the impacts of farm waste-based soil amendments on the soil physio-chemical properties and biological properties of Ghanaian cocoa farms. 3. assess the impacts of farm waste-based soil amendments on the performance of juvenile and mature cocoa trees in terms of growth and yield. 4. determine whether the use of farm waste-based soil amendments can ameliorate abiotic and biotic stresses. 5. ascertain whether the use of shade trees impacts on soil health. 6. conduct a cost: benefit analysis of the use of farm waste-based soil amendments. 7. disseminate the findings of the research to farmers and other relevant stakeholders.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-BB_S014454_1

Start Date:

2019-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£451,387.30


Expanding safe water and waste management service access to off-grid urban populations in Africa

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

According to WHO/UNICEF, whilst 91.8% of urban households in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) had access to piped or protected groundwater sources in 2015, only 46.2% had safely managed water available when needed. Vendors provide a key role in supplying urban off-grid populations, with consumption of bottled or bagged water (sachets, water sold in 500ml plastic bags) growing in SSA. Whilst several studies show bottles and bags are usually free from faecal contamination, given that many off-grid urban populations lack solid waste disposal services, when people drink such water, there can be problems disposing of the plastic bags and bottles afterwards. This project aims to deliver evidence on the different ways that people sell water to off-grid populations and what this means for plastic waste management. We plan to do this in Ghana, where most urban household now drink bagged water, and by way of contrast, Kenya, where the government has banned plastic bags. In this way, we want to widen access to safe water and waste management services among urban off-grid populations, by supporting water-sellers and waste collectors to fill the gaps in municipal services. Both countries (and many others elsewhere) already have nationwide household surveys that collect data on the food and goods people consume and the services they have. However, as yet, these surveys have not been connected to the problem of waste management. We plan to visit marketplaces, buying foods and then recording packaging and organic waste. By combining this information with the household survey data, we can work out how much domestic waste like plastics gets collected and how much is discarded or burned, ultimately entering the atmosphere or oceans. In Ghana, we will also survey informal waste collectors in urban Greater Accra. We want to find out how much these small businesses support waste collection and recycling across this urban region (particularly plastic from bagged water), so we can help government identify gaps in waste collection coverage. We also believe highlighting the important role of small waste collectors could lead to greater business support for such collectors. We will also evaluate whether community education campaigns to encourage domestic waste recycling reduce the amount of waste and plastic observed in the local environment. Such campaigns are currently pursued by several local charities with support from the Plastic Waste Management Project. In Kenya, where water is usually sold in jerrycans rather than bagged, the jerrycan water often gets contaminated. We plan to find out whether this jerrycan water is safer under an arrangement known as delegated management. This involves a water utility passing on management of the piped network to a local business in slum areas, so as to reduce vandalism of pipes and bring water closer to slum-dwellers. We will compare water quality in areas with and without this arrangement to see if it makes the water sold safer. We also plan to bring water-sellers and consumers together to find and test ways of reducing contamination of water between a jerry-can being filled and water being drunk at home. Rather than imposing a solution, we want to work together with vendors and consumers on this issue, but there are for example containers designed to keep water cleaner that we could explore. Through these activities, we thus plan to develop evidence on different strategies for water-sellers to deliver safer water to people lacking piped connections, whilst managing plastic waste at the same time. In Ghana, this involves trying to increase recycling and waste collection for bagged water, which is relatively safe. In Kenya, this involves trying to reduce contamination of water sold in reusable jerrycans. Alongside our household survey evidence on how domestic waste is managed in slums, this should help governments plan waste and water services in poorer areas of Africa's expanding cities.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-ES_T008121_1

Start Date:

2020-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£811,436.45


The Dynamics of Filovirus Infection in bats in Ghana

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The main scientific objective of the study is to determine key aspects of the dynamics of filovirus infections in reservoir bat species in Ghana, West Africa. An understanding of how these viruses persist in their natural hosts is necessary in order to identify the optimal local means of avoiding spillover of infection into humans, or into 'bridging' domestic animal or wildlife species. Local public health responses to the presence of these infections, informed by local knowledge, can thus be enhanced. In order to deliver this objective, we will develop and validate the necessary assays for filoviruses in West African bats, based on the characterisation of filoviruses that persist in infected bat populations in Ghana. These will include optimised PCR assays and pseudotype virus-based serological assays. An important parallel objective of this work is to add to ongoing capacity building efforts in West Africa, by extending the University of Cambridge collaboration with the University of Ghana (UG) and by building South-South collaborative networks to strengthen local response capabilities. We aim to fully equip the virology laboratory within WACCBIP to allow modern molecular analyses and cell-culture based pseudotype virus neutralisation studies. The Cambridge based CAPREx fellowship held by Dr Osbourne Quaye will be extended to include training in all of these approaches. Also, the virology laboratory in UG will be linked with the sequencing facility established at the University of Makeni, Sierra Leone by funding from the Wellcome Trust as part of a Cambridge-Africa supported post-Ebola legacy program. Sequencing of all African viruses will be undertaken within the University of Makeni Infectious Disease Laboratory. Specific scientific objectives include 1) Testing purposefully collected samples from bat roosts shown serologically to be infected with Ebola and/or Marburg viruses for the presence of filoviruses and the molecular characterisation (including isolation if possible) of the virus variants in the samples; in doing so, determining the variability of filoviruses both within individual bats and in populations. 2) Developing and standardising pseudotype virus-based neutralisation assays to determine serological responses to those viruses actually present in the infected roosts and to determine the age profiles of infected bats to identify key epidemiological patterns of how the viruses persist in their bat reservoirs. 3) Test prospectively collected longitudinal samples from infected bat roosts to allow estimation of rates of transmission of filoviruses between individual bats and also between different species of bats in Ghana. 4) Using our Ghana-specific filovirus serology assays, to expand on preliminary work using an Ebola Zaire sGp antigen-binding assay, to identify ""at risk"" groups of people for virus spillover, such as bat hunters, bat butchers and people who live and/or work underneath bat roosts. 5) Work with local Public Health officials to use the data derived from these studies to mitigate risks of further filovirus spillover to humans in West Africa.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-MR_P025226_1

Start Date:

2017-04-01

Activity Status:

Finalisation

Total Budget:

£603,493.64


A vector excreta surveillance system (VESS) to support the rapid detection of vector-borne diseases

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Current approaches for the early detection of emergent and resurgent vector borne disease are out of reach for many low and middle income countries due to the extensive resources required to detect low community prevalence. This challenge is even greater for communities at risk for multiple vector-borne disease outbreaks, and diseases which do not prompt treatment-seeking behaviour. We present a novel, non-invasive and adaptable approach to disease surveillance which requires further stimulus to meet the needs of the global health community to monitor emerging vector-borne diseases. The vector excreta surveillance system (VESS) serves as an early alert tool by collecting and concentrating the excretory products from wild mosquitoes for the purposes of detecting digested pathogen DNA. We have conducted the initial studies to quantify mosquito excretion patterns in various mosquito genera in the lab, we have developed a low cost prototype for excreta collection and we have successfully amplified filarial and protozoan parasite DNA from vector and non-vector excreta and faeces (E/F). We are now ready to further develop this approach to meet the needs of disease control programmes for early, low-cost, and sensitive detection of vector-borne diseases. The project aims to: 1) Field test the approach that we have optimised in the lab to detect filarial and malaria DNA in wild mosquito E/F. Under this aim we will compare infection prevalence from pooled E/F with infection prevalence in whole mosquitoes. We will also compare the sensitivity of E/F detection using a field friendly strip-based detection to the quantitative PCR. 2) Expand molecular testing to detect protozoan and viral nucleic acids in vector and non-vector E/F. We will build on our preliminary work to define the detection limits for Trypanosoma brucei brucei and we will pilot arbovirus detection using West Nile Virus. Following optimisation for WNV detection, we will also apply the methodology to detect dengue, Zika and chikungunya viruses. The foundation award will support a collaboration of scientists which represent the spectrum of translational research, enabling us to deliver a field-ready approach now and explore the promise to detect other blood-borne pathogens of both humans and animals in the future.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-MR_P025285_1

Start Date:

2017-04-01

Activity Status:

Finalisation

Total Budget:

£508,718.95


Biomass Fuel at the Nexus: Policy Lessons from Bottom-Up Perspectives in Urban Ghana

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

80 percent of sub-Saharan households are estimated to rely on solid biomass as fuel for cooking. Worldwide, biomass fuel use is disproportionately rural. But in sub-Saharan Africa, the International Energy Agency estimates that 60 percent of urban dwellers use wood or wood-based products (charcoal). Biomass fuel use is linked to premature death from pollution, environmental problems of deforestation and emissions linked to climate change. Hence, the Sustainable Development Goal 7 promises to ""ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all"" by 2030. Policy initiatives have tended to take a siloed approach to this problem, targeting 'clean energy' from specific artefacts (improved cookstoves, biogas digesters) or cleaner fuels. In 2010, the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves set a target for take-up of cleaner stoves and fuels in a ""100 million households by 2020"". Yet, improved stove designs have been promoted since the late 1940s with limited success. Where biomass fuel has been considered within a wider nexus, a top-down approach has led to misleading assumptions. In the 1970s, fuelwood gathering was equated with deforestation; no consideration was given to whether rural dwellers managed the process in harmonious ways as social scientists discovered in some cases. Studies of local attitudes to policy-defined problems are now common, but results of structured questionnaires are open to question with poorer householders likely to feel constrained to answer in ways 'expected' of them. Qualitative researchers have highlighted unexpected findings from a more open-ended approach focusing on the tensions and harmonies constituting the daily hum of life in households. Three factors point to the value of a bottom-up nexus approach to biomass fuel policies. First, designers associate the stove with cooking food and aim to optimise the use of wood or charcoal. Yet, in practice, lighting, heating, water purification, food preparation, and food waste management are all potentially relevant. Rather than focus on 'clean energy' or even food, understanding how households manage the nexus between food, fuel and waste is important. Second, this nexus must be placed in the context of other household realities. Our previous work shows that the ability to adopt cleaner fuels/stoves is shaped by competing priorities, aspirations and constraints that cut across livelihoods, income and social structures (notably, gender). Third, policies targeting fuels (as opposed to stoves or digesters) would also benefit from a bottom-up perspective on the nexus between how fuel production and management, and the environment. For example, some charcoal producers contest that wood-clearing necessarily leads to deforestation. We will address these challenges by co-creating and disseminating a policy-relevant nexus-based understanding through a partnership between the University of Nottingham team leading the project and academics and stakeholders in West Africa. The research will focus on urban Ghana where there is a resurgence of policy interest in cleaner stoves and fuels. Our partners include the University of Ibadan, Ho Polytechnic, the Ghana Alliance for Clean Cookstoves (GHACCO) and Gyapa, a social enterprise working across the sustainable energy supply chain. We will explore a.) how householders view clean energy in relation to other aspects of resource management, and what their choices reveal about their priorities and aspirations; b.) how charcoal producers and retailers manage priorities of forest conservation, fuel-users and others along the supply chain; and c.) how insights from this analysis might be used to refine national- and global-level policies targeting cleaner stoves and fuels.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-ES_P002617_1

Start Date:

2016-10-01

Activity Status:

Finalisation

Total Budget:

£55,753.11


International Innovation Project on the Computer-aided High Throughput Development and Upscaling of Tailored Zeolites as Waste Water Filters in Ghana

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Illegal gold mining operations are a growing problem in Ghana, owing to the practice of alluvial mining techniques and the heavy use of toxic chemicals, which leads to significant pollution by cyanide, mercury, other heavy metals and organic contaminants, of the water sources that serve the local population. The mining and other local communities are thus deprived of access to clean water, leading to serious health problems. In addition to any chemical treatment of the effluent water, there is an urgent need to develop physical absorbents to remove the pollutants, which, however, need to be both efficient and cost-effective. Microporous zeolite materials are very effective absorbents and ion exchangers, which can be tuned to be highly selective towards adsorbate(s) of interest, with the accompanying release of non-toxic ions into the environment. They can be synthesised from readily available materials and are compact, cheap and simple to maintain in full-scale operations. This cross-disciplinary project will bring together an experienced team of geochemists, physicists, computational and materials scientists from academia and industry to develop efficient synthetic zeolites, made from naturally available minerals, for the cost-effective treatment of waste water from gold mines, before its discharge into the environment. The zeolites will be characterised and tested on a laboratory scale before up-scaling both synthesis and filtration process into an operational treatment plant to serve a local metropolitan population.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-NE_R009376_1

Start Date:

2017-11-01

Activity Status:

Finalisation

Total Budget:

£107,175.41


Ghana Partnerships Beyond Aid Programme

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

To improve governance and accountability in Education, Health and Social Protection sectors and contribute to policy and research.

Project identifier:

GB-1-203640

Start Date:

2020-01-22

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£13,009,997


Agriculture Transformation in Ghana

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

To accelerate economic transformation in Ghana through developing markets for agriculture and trade, improving resilience to climate change, and creating additional jobs and increased incomes by focusing on the development of high potential value chains in pro-poor sectors, supporting them to become productive, competitive and attractive for investment.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-1-300794

Start Date:

2020-01-13

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£2,472,763


Tackling Serious and Organised Crime in Ghana (SOCG)

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

This programme will seek to reduce the negative impact that SOC has on Ghana’s development, by improving governance and raising awareness, commitment and capacity to address it within government, civil society and business. In doing so, it will address direct threats to the UK, and support wider UK security objectives.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-1-301282

Start Date:

2021-09-27

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£3,500,000


Education Beyond Aid (EBA) Ghana

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

The purpose of this programme is to increase the Ministry of Education’s self-reliance in managing the education sector and delivering quality education services to Ghana’s children, including to the most vulnerable. This programme has two components, the first of which will establish and operationalise within the Ministry of Education a delivery unit (called the ‘Reform Secretariat’) to oversee the implementation of its ambitious education reform agenda, and the second of which will support the Ministry of Education and related agencies to effectively resource, manage and implement the Complementary Basic Education (CBE) programme to reach out-of-school girls and boys in Ghana.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-1-300517

Start Date:

2018-10-15

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£4,949,997




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