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FCDO ODA allocations for 2021/22 were announced on 21 April 2021. Changes to individual programmes are underway. The information on this website may not reflect the latest allocated budgets for this year. This information will be updated in due course.

UK aid from the British people

Georgia

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Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund Round 6

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

Illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is the fifth most lucrative transnational crime, worth up to £17bn a year globally. As well as threatening species with extinction, IWT destroys vital ecosystems. IWT also fosters corruption, feeds insecurity, and undermines good governance and the rule of law. The UK government is committed to tackling illegal trade of wildlife products. Defra manages the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, which is a competitive grants scheme with the objective of tackling illegal wildlife trade and, in doing so, contributing to sustainable development in developing countries. Projects funded under the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund address one, or more, of the following themes: • Developing sustainable livelihoods to benefit people directly affected by IWT • Strengthening law enforcement • Ensuring effective legal frameworks • Reducing demand for IWT products Over £26 million has been committed to 85 projects since the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund was established in 2013; five projects were awarded in 2014 (via applications to the Darwin Initiative), fourteen in 2015, fifteen in 2016, thirteen in 2017, fourteen in 2018 and thirteen in 2019 and ten in the latest round in 2020. (more info here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/919053/iwt-challenge-fund-list.pdf): IWT076, IWT077, IWT078, IWT082, IWT083, IWT079, IWT080, IWT081, IWT084, IWT085

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-IWTCF-R6

Start Date:

2020-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£3,417,064


Darwin Initiative Round 24

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

The Darwin Initiative is a UK government grants scheme that helps to protect biodiversity and the natural environment through locally based projects worldwide. The initiative funds projects that help countries rich in biodiversity but poor in financial resources to meet their objectives under one or more of the biodiversity conventions. The objective is to to address threats to biodiversity such as: - habitat loss or degradation - climate change - invasive species - over-exploitation - pollution and eutrophication

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-DAR24

Start Date:

2018-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£10,604,188


British Academy Core - Challenge-led grants: Sustainable Development

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

This programme funds excellent, policy-oriented UK research, aimed at addressing the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and advancing the UK’s Aid Strategy. It supports researchers in the humanities and the social sciences working to generate evidence on the challenges and opportunities faced in developing countries and respond to the Sustainable Development Goals. The Academy is particularly keen to encourage applications from the humanities in this round.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-BA-GCRF-04

Start Date:

2016-12-31

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£8,895,000


Widening participation and increasing access to Cultural Heritage and Natural Science Activities in Georgia.

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Georgia has suffered a series of crises since the end of communism in 1991, suffering a civil war, the loss of Abkhazia and, since 2008 Tskhinvali/South Ossetia has been occupied by the Russian army. This means that there are up to 232,700 IDPs in Georgia (http://www.internal-displacement.org/europe-the-caucasus-and-central-asia/georgia/figures-analysis) out of a population of 3.9 million (http://worldpopulationreview.com/countries/georgia-population/) which equates to almost 17% of the overall population of the country. 20% of the country's territory is occupied by Russia (https://www.georgianjournal.ge/politics/34274-10-years-after-putins-invasion-russia-still-occupies-parts-of-georgia-daily-signal.html) and these factors have placed a significant social, political and economic strain on society. Added to this the population of Tbilisi is now officially 1,225,000 (http://tbilisiguide.ge/w/about_georgia.php) although it is believed the real total is higher, and this movement from the villages to the capital has precipitated a crisis in life opportunities for many young people. Educational needs To place this initiative in a wider context, it must be understood that there is such chronic underfunding of the Georgian schools system that children attend in two shifts - 10.00-14.00 and 14.00-18.00 meaning that no child studies for a full day as is normal in most other European countries. In addition the extremely long holidays and many National Bank Holidays further curtail the school year, as does the widespread practice of children being withdrawn for the last 2 weeks of term each academic year and sent off to relatives in the provinces. In the villages, school buildings are often almost derelict Soviet era constructions that are dangerously unstable and teachers earn in the region of 300 Lari (less than £90) a month, meaning that many have to take on second jobs or run smallholdings to cover their living costs. Given this chronically under-funded education system there is an urgent need to offer advanced skills training and resource packs to teachers in order to raise the level of morale and also to encourage teachers to talk to children about wider aspirations beyond their rural communities and consider the possibilities offered by tertiary education. Educational Capacity Building This strategy envisages a more unified approach that builds on Ministry of Education objectives, to implement further training for curatorial staff and teachers so that they have the skills necessary to develop classes in a museum or other heritage context. For some time Prof. Dr. David Lordkipanidze, Director of the GNM, has been searching for partners to help the GMN work with teachers and children from IDP backgrounds or living in the most remote parts of the country. His vision has been to inspire children from places such as the High Caucasus or the Azeri and Armenian minorities in the south to aspire to a career in the Humanities or the Natural Sciences with a view to them ultimately working as academics or curators. His methodology has been to organise summer camps and activity days for children, which is in line with the Ministry of Culture's Heritage 2025 strategy, that calls upon institutions like the GNM to take a leading role in offering skills development to teachers and engage with the most economically marginalised members of society. This research proposes to utilise the approach favoured by the Director of the GNM and institute a training network involving GNM junior curators and educational staff interacting with regional schoolteachers to promote museums and cultural heritage sites as inviting spaces for classes in which to teach children about the value of not only cultural heritage, but also the Humanities in general.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-AH_S003541_1

Start Date:

2019-01-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£50,754.34


Designing and evaluating provider results-based financing for tuberculosis care in Georgia: understanding costs, mechanisms of effect and impact

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Georgia has a high tuberculosis (TB) incidence of 106 per 100,000 population (TB all forms). The overall TB treatment success rate in 2013 was 80% for new TB cases, which is below the global average (86%) [1]. The low treatment success is largely due to a loss to follow up (LFU) of around 10% [1]. Reducing the LFU is not only essential for patient outcomes, but also to prevent multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB. Georgia belongs to 27 high MDR-TB burden countries with about 12% of new cases resistant to the first line drugs [1]. Among MDR-TB patients, treatment success rate is 48%, compared to other high MDR-TB countries, which mostly report treatment success rates exceeding 70% [1,3]. Currently a programme is in place to provide monetary incentives to patients with support from the Global Fund (GF) and the government. The aim of this program is to improve patient adherence to TB treatment. However, demand side interventions may not be enough as barriers may remain for providers. In Georgia, TB services are currently provided by a mix of public and private providers. Primary health care (PHC) providers are responsible for initial diagnosis and referrals of presumptive TB case to specialised TB services, and TB specialists are responsible for the ambulatory treatment and follow up of TB patients. The payment model of general and specialised TB service providers may not to provide sufficient incentives to improve efficiency and quality of care, particularly as mandatory requirement for private sector for retaining TB services (set by the Government of Georgia (GoG) seven years ago) may be removed in the coming years. Moreover, TB staff salaries are amongst the lowest in the health care system, leading to demotivation and unwillingness to deliver high quality care [3].Given this context, the government plans to introduce provider focused result-based financing (RBF) into the TB programme to overcome the current bottlenecks for the supply-side of TB care. Provider RBF is to be initiated in pilot areas in 2017[4]. Although TB indicators are included in about half of the RBF schemes examined globally [5], there is currently little documentation of how RBF changes provider behaviour and contributes to better adherence and treatment outcomes [6]. Specifically, the link between RBF, measures to improve quality of services, and adherence is unknown. There is also a lack of evidence on important dimensions of RBF, such as cost-effectiveness compared to other approaches, effect on organizational and providers behaviour, impact on equity, negative or positive unintended effects, and the feasibility and impact of the application of RBF to the private sector [6,7,8,9]. This proposal aims to take advantage of the government's plans to pilot RBF for TB providers in Georgia in order to shape and assess this intervention. The main goal of the research is to assist the Georgian government in developing a provider incentive payment scheme for TB (as a pilot RBF intervention) and to generate evidence on its effects on adherence and treatment success rates, cost, and how it works in different contexts in Georgia. More specifically, the research objectives are: 1. To support the design of a pilot RBF intervention which is meant to is meant to address the current supply side weaknesses of TB service delivery and to document the joint development of the intervention with policy makers; 2. To examine the (i) impact, (ii) cost-effectiveness and (iii) underlying mechanisms and wider effects of the RBF intervention using a theory-informed controlled trial design; 3. To assess and provide insights for policy-makers on how the RBF intervention could be fine-tuned and modified, if necessary, to optimise a potential national roll-out and extension; 4. From a methodological perspective, to develop understanding of how the realist evaluation approach can be used to inform intervention trials and cost-effectiveness analysis.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-MR_P015018_1

Start Date:

2017-03-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£598,506.27


British Council - Georgia

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

Contributing to shared prosperity and development through projects which support the skills, employability and education of young people, strengthen English language teaching and learning and promote development of arts and culture.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-3-BC-GE-11

Start Date:

2016-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£3,416,276.51


Good Governance Fund - Supporting governance and economic reform in Georgia

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

Through a range of partners including International Financial Institutions, multilateral organisations, private sector and CSOs, the Good Governance Fund supports a series of governance and economic reform initiatives, aimed at building stability, reducing poverty and increasing prosperity in Ukraine, Georgia, Moldova, Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), Armenia and North Macedonia. This programme is comprised of a number of projects operational in Georgia, where support will focus on areas including business environment reform, addressing the skills mismatch, public administration reform and promoting inclusive and participatory governance.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-1-300874

Start Date:

2019-05-02

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£5,591,542


Chevening Scholarships in Georgia

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

Assistance in line with UK objectives on Chevening Scholarships in Georgia which enables students to pursue postgraduate study at UK higher education institutions, returning to contribute to the development of their home country

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-3-Chevening-Scholarships-GE

Start Date:

2018-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,091,698


GGF II: The Good Governance Fund - Collaboration with International Financial Institutions and other Partners (II)

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

Through International Financial Institutions and other multilateral organisations, the Good Governance Fund will support a series of governance and economic reform initiatives, aimed at building stability, reducing poverty and increasing prosperity in Ukraine, Georgia, Moldova, Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH). The support will focus on areas such as: anti-corruption; improving the business environment; judicial reform; key sector reforms (e.g. banking and energy); strengthening the rule of law; and supporting an independent media. This project was approved before the referendum on the UK’s membership of the EU. Work is now under way to understand the implications of leaving the EU for the UK’s development work.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-1-300251

Start Date:

2016-07-27

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£14,286,282


Good Governance Fund Investment Climate and Governance Initiative

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

To help foster transition in its countries of operation through enhanced policy dialogue and national-level initiatives focused on strengthening economic governance and improving the investment climate.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-1-301365

Start Date:

2021-08-03

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£761,075




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