Go to main content

FCDO ODA allocations for 2021/22 were announced on 21 April 2021. Changes to individual programmes are underway. The information on this website may not reflect the latest allocated budgets for this year. This information will be updated in due course.

UK aid from the British people

Egypt

Default filter shows currently active projects. To see projects at other stages, use the status filters.
Advanced Filters

Advanced Filters

To search for projects in a specific time period, please enter the start and end dates.

Start Date
For example, 01 01 2007
End Date
For example, 12 11 2007
Results:
1 - 20 of 34

Filters Clear all

Activity Status

Tags

Sectors

Participating Orgs

Benefiting Countries

Benefiting Regions

Document Categories

Egypt Country Programme

Conflict, Stability and Security Fund

This programme aims to support (1) Inclusive economic growth in Egypt through an improved fiscal position, an improved business environment, job creation, and international recognition of the improved quality of governance. (2) Education reform to increase public access to quality education, increase human capital and strengthen economic participation. (3) Government reforms, strengthening civil society, and directly supporting NGOs in order to tackle inequality, marginalisation and extreme poverty. This is an ODA and non-ODA integrated programme. The spend reported against this programme is the ODA element alone.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-52-CSSF-06-000002

Start Date:

2017-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£13,650,000


Leaders in Innovation Fellowships Programme v2

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The Leaders in Innovation Fellowships programme builds technology entrepreneurship capacity of select partner country researchers who are developing a business proposition for their innovation which must meet a development challenge. Selected researchers benefit from focussed short term training and long term support through access to expert mentors and international networks.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-NEWT-RAE_EGY_723

Start Date:

2016-10-01

Activity Status:

Pipeline/identification

Total Budget:

£481,200


Arinna Solar Power SAE

CDC Group plc

Our investment supports the Nubian Suns project, which will construct 13 solar power plants at the Benban Solar Park in Egypt (our investment spans nine of the 13 projects for a total capacity close to 400 megawatts). Estimates suggest that 18 per cent of Egypt’s power capacity is inaccessible due to poor maintenance. The Egyptian Government has set a target to generate 20 per cent of its power production originating from renewable sources by 2022. Nubian Suns plays a central part in a programme which is introducing international investors and banks to Egypt at a crucial time for the country. The initiative is aimed at lowering Egypt’s cost of electricity generation, reducing the dependence on imported fossil fuels, and providing essential energy harnessed from a clean and renewable resource.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F317201

Start Date:

2017-10-09

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


ARC For Renewable Energy SAE

CDC Group plc

Our investment supports the Nubian Suns project, which will construct 13 solar power plants at the Benban Solar Park in Egypt (our investment spans nine of the 13 projects for a total capacity close to 400 megawatts). Estimates suggest that 18 per cent of Egypt’s power capacity is inaccessible due to poor maintenance. The Egyptian Government has set a target to generate 20 per cent of its power production originating from renewable sources by 2022. Nubian Suns plays a central part in a programme which is introducing international investors and banks to Egypt at a crucial time for the country. The initiative is aimed at lowering Egypt’s cost of electricity generation, reducing the dependence on imported fossil fuels, and providing essential energy harnessed from a clean and renewable resource.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F317101

Start Date:

2017-10-12

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


Alcazar Energy Egypt Solar 1 SAE

CDC Group plc

Our investment supports the Nubian Suns project, which will construct 13 solar power plants at the Benban Solar Park in Egypt (our investment spans nine of the 13 projects for a total capacity close to 400 megawatts). Estimates suggest that 18 per cent of Egypt’s power capacity is inaccessible due to poor maintenance. The Egyptian Government has set a target to generate 20 per cent of its power production originating from renewable sources by 2022. Nubian Suns plays a central part in a programme which is introducing international investors and banks to Egypt at a crucial time for the country. The initiative is aimed at lowering Egypt’s cost of electricity generation, reducing the dependence on imported fossil fuels, and providing essential energy harnessed from a clean and renewable resource.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F317001

Start Date:

2017-10-11

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


SP Energy (Egypt) SAE

CDC Group plc

Our investment supports the Nubian Suns project, which will construct 13 solar power plants at the Benban Solar Park in Egypt (our investment spans nine of the 13 projects for a total capacity close to 400 megawatts). Estimates suggest that 18 per cent of Egypt’s power capacity is inaccessible due to poor maintenance. The Egyptian Government has set a target to generate 20 per cent of its power production originating from renewable sources by 2022. Nubian Suns plays a central part in a programme which is introducing international investors and banks to Egypt at a crucial time for the country. The initiative is aimed at lowering Egypt’s cost of electricity generation, reducing the dependence on imported fossil fuels, and providing essential energy harnessed from a clean and renewable resource.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F317701

Start Date:

2017-10-11

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


Delta for Renewable Energy SAE

CDC Group plc

Our investment supports the Nubian Suns project, which will construct 13 solar power plants at the Benban Solar Park in Egypt (our investment spans nine of the 13 projects for a total capacity close to 400 megawatts). Estimates suggest that 18 per cent of Egypt’s power capacity is inaccessible due to poor maintenance. The Egyptian Government has set a target to generate 20 per cent of its power production originating from renewable sources by 2022. Nubian Suns plays a central part in a programme which is introducing international investors and banks to Egypt at a crucial time for the country. The initiative is aimed at lowering Egypt’s cost of electricity generation, reducing the dependence on imported fossil fuels, and providing essential energy harnessed from a clean and renewable resource.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F317401

Start Date:

2017-10-11

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


Aten Solar Energy SAE

CDC Group plc

Our investment supports the Nubian Suns project, which will construct 13 solar power plants at the Benban Solar Park in Egypt (our investment spans nine of the 13 projects for a total capacity close to 400 megawatts). Estimates suggest that 18 per cent of Egypt’s power capacity is inaccessible due to poor maintenance. The Egyptian Government has set a target to generate 20 per cent of its power production originating from renewable sources by 2022. Nubian Suns plays a central part in a programme which is introducing international investors and banks to Egypt at a crucial time for the country. The initiative is aimed at lowering Egypt’s cost of electricity generation, reducing the dependence on imported fossil fuels, and providing essential energy harnessed from a clean and renewable resource.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F317301

Start Date:

2017-10-20

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


Horus Solar Energy SAE

CDC Group plc

Our investment supports the Nubian Suns project, which will construct 13 solar power plants at the Benban Solar Park in Egypt (our investment spans nine of the 13 projects for a total capacity close to 400 megawatts). Estimates suggest that 18 per cent of Egypt’s power capacity is inaccessible due to poor maintenance. The Egyptian Government has set a target to generate 20 per cent of its power production originating from renewable sources by 2022. Nubian Suns plays a central part in a programme which is introducing international investors and banks to Egypt at a crucial time for the country. The initiative is aimed at lowering Egypt’s cost of electricity generation, reducing the dependence on imported fossil fuels, and providing essential energy harnessed from a clean and renewable resource.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F317501

Start Date:

2017-10-20

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


Phoenix Power SAE

CDC Group plc

Our investment supports the Nubian Suns project, which will construct 13 solar power plants at the Benban Solar Park in Egypt (our investment spans nine of the 13 projects for a total capacity close to 400 megawatts). Estimates suggest that 18 per cent of Egypt’s power capacity is inaccessible due to poor maintenance. The Egyptian Government has set a target to generate 20 per cent of its power production originating from renewable sources by 2022. Nubian Suns plays a central part in a programme which is introducing international investors and banks to Egypt at a crucial time for the country. The initiative is aimed at lowering Egypt’s cost of electricity generation, reducing the dependence on imported fossil fuels, and providing essential energy harnessed from a clean and renewable resource.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F317601

Start Date:

2017-10-09

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


Winnergy for Renewable Energy Projects SAE

CDC Group plc

Our investment supports the Nubian Suns project, which will construct 13 solar power plants at the Benban Solar Park in Egypt (our investment spans nine of the 13 projects for a total capacity close to 400 megawatts). Estimates suggest that 18 per cent of Egypt’s power capacity is inaccessible due to poor maintenance. The Egyptian Government has set a target to generate 20 per cent of its power production originating from renewable sources by 2022. Nubian Suns plays a central part in a programme which is introducing international investors and banks to Egypt at a crucial time for the country. The initiative is aimed at lowering Egypt’s cost of electricity generation, reducing the dependence on imported fossil fuels, and providing essential energy harnessed from a clean and renewable resource.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F317801

Start Date:

2017-10-12

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


British Council - Egypt - Newton Fund

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The Newton Fund uses science and innovation partnerships to promote economic development and social welfare of partner countries.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-NEWT-BC-Egypt

Start Date:

2014-10-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£16,183,998.53


Leaders in Innovation Fellowships Programme v1

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The Leaders in Innovation Fellowships programme builds technology entrepreneurship capacity of select partner country researchers who are developing a business proposition for their innovation which must meet a development challenge. Selected researchers benefit from focussed short term training and long term support through access to expert mentors and international networks.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-NEWT-RAE_EGY_722

Start Date:

2015-10-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£499,143.23


British Academy Core - Challenge-led grants: Sustainable Development

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

This programme funds excellent, policy-oriented UK research, aimed at addressing the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and advancing the UK’s Aid Strategy. It supports researchers in the humanities and the social sciences working to generate evidence on the challenges and opportunities faced in developing countries and respond to the Sustainable Development Goals. The Academy is particularly keen to encourage applications from the humanities in this round.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-BA-GCRF-04

Start Date:

2016-12-31

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£8,895,000


British Academy Coherence & Impact - Challenge-led grants: Early Childhood Education

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The projects funded under this programme aim to provide critical knowledge to inform policy-making in the education and broader learning domain, while recognising the necessary interplay of education with health, nutrition, gender equality and other disciplines and sectors.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-GCRF-CImChlGECE

Start Date:

2019-10-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£4,321,513


Language development in Arabic-speaking children in the early years: tackling the roots of academic and social inequalities

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The developmental period from 0-4 years lays the foundations of an individual's life-course, setting the trajectory for their long-term outcomes in health, education, employment and wellbeing. Language is at the heart of this trajectory. Because ""skill begets skill"" (Heckman, 2008), addressing language difficulties at this stage brings much greater gains and economic returns than when children are older. In the Arab world policy-makers tend to focus on later remedial programmes, with much reduced chances of 'narrowing the gap', especially for socially disadvantaged children. Across any population ~7% of children do not reach expected levels in language development. This corresponds to ~23 million children and adolescents with language difficulties in Middle Eastern and North African countries. Whilst these difficulties are found across the social spectrum, their prevalence is higher in socially disadvantaged families, reaching up to 40% in some UK schools. This 4-year project is a multi-disciplinary collaboration between two UK universities (Newcastle and Plymouth) and the University St Joseph (Beirut), the Jordan University of Science and Technology, and Birzeit University (West Bank), with activities covering Egypt, Jordan, the West Bank and Lebanon. It brings together a team of linguists, psychologists, speech and language therapists, paediatricians and educators to develop the necessary knowledge and tools for effective Early Years policy in Levantine countries and Egypt. Our aim is to address the lack of culturally sensitive and standardised tools to measure language development in Arabic-speaking children, as a primary indicator of healthy development and the foundation skill for education. For this, we need to show the feasibility of a multi-dialect approach, and we need to quantify the effects of social disadvantage, multilingualism and childcare mode on language development. We also need to estimate how war-related traumas impact trajectories of language development in the region. Finally, we need to raise awareness of the importance of early language skills in the public and policy makers, empower end users with tools to screen children for language delays and provision for language-centered curricula, and disseminate the expertise of local practitioners for prevention and interventions. In WP1, we adapt and standardise the Communicative Development Inventory (CDI) across all four countries. The CDI is the Gold Standard parental questionnaire to assess vocabulary and language development in infants aged 8 months to 4 years. In WP2, we focus on Lebanon, where the multiethnic and multilingual situation creates an acutely complex picture. Using the CDI as an investigation tool, we define an accurate measure of social disadvantage and examine how the diversity of childcare mode impacts language skills. We evaluate the most efficient way to account for multilingualism by comparing the Arabic CDI to the Lebanese trilingual CDI. Finally, with the CDI, the ASQ (5 developmental domains) and the SDQ (socioemotional skills), we paint a full picture of developmental trajectories in Syrian and Palestinian refugee children in settlements and camps, to circle back contextualised information to NGOs and policy makers. In WP3, we set up a key stakeholder group and co-design appropriate methods to maximise the impact of knowledge gathered from WP1 and 2. In particular we develop an app version of the standardised CDI, providing free assessment and culture-specific, parent-centred activities. We co-create a series of social media campaigns, professional training events, seminars for practitioners and policy makers. With refugee families, we promote and evaluate Early Years activities geared towards getting children ready for school and reducing dropout rates. Beyond the focus on Lebanon, we assess the exportability of these initiativesto partner countries, with the long-term goal of reaching out to the rest of the Middle East.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-ES_T003995_1

Start Date:

2020-01-31

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£570,235.71


Preserving Egypt's Cultural Heritage from Earthquake Damage through Vibrating Barriers (ViBa)

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The historical sites and monuments in Egypt are among the most important in the world and conserving this heritage is crucial. The large damage observed in hundreds of monuments after the Cairo Earthquake in 1992 unveiled the fragility of the Egyptian heritage asset to seismic hazards. More than 12 years and a huge investment were needed to reopen some of the damaged sites. Unfortunately, the current knowledge on the strengthening and mitigation of the seismic risk in heritage buildings is focused on invasive solutions that require the alteration of the historical structure and, with it, the modification of its essence. In addition, these precursor works are not focused on the specific case of the Egyptian monuments and the seismic activity in the region. As a result, the cultural asset of Egypt is threatened by the seismic hazard. This research aims to apply an innovative concept in earthquake engineering to the control of whole heritage sites without the need for alteration in the ancient structures. The idea is to introduce a vibrating barrier (ViBa) in the ground (completely external to the protected structures) that is able to interact with the soil and the earthquake in order to mitigate the seismic risk in the entire site. The project combines the expertise of academic teams in Egypt and UK towards the application of this novel idea. The team at Cairo University will implement an advanced numerical technique with Boundary Elements to solve the soil-structure interaction problem with ViBa. This barrier will be designed and tested experimentally in scaled models by the team at the University of Brighton, the original developers of the ViBa. Finally, the expertise of the team at City, University of London, in nonlinear dynamic analyses will be applied to the study of the site with the ViBa in large Finite Element models that consider the particular seismic, geotechnical and structural conditions in Egypt. The successful development of this project will result in the generation of new and fundamental knowledge on the control of structures with protection barriers, ultimately preserving the Egyptian heritage and the lives of the persons in these sites. It will also result in the development of design guidelines that will facilitate the application of the project outcomes by engineering practitioners and industry.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-AH_R007934_1

Start Date:

2019-05-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£206,929.47


Interdisciplinary approach for the management and conservation of UNESCO World Heritage Site of Historic Cairo. Application to Al-Ashraf Street.

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Egypt is very rich with archaeological sites. These sites contribute significantly to the tourism industry which is one of the main income sources for the Egyptian economy. However, the management and conservation of these sites is a challenging task due to the ever-increasing threats such as population growth, urbanization, pollution, natural hazards, among others. These threats result in the gradual deterioration of these sites, and hence results in significant economic losses. Interdisciplinary management is fundamental to the conservation of these sites, particularly when dealing with large areas such as Historic Cairo which contains more than 600 listed historical structures. Unfortunately, however, Historic Cairo suffers from the following: 1) deterioration of its historical structures at an alarming rate; 2) poor site management; 3) disempowerment of local communities, thus depriving them of their role as main stakeholders and beneficiaries of heritage; 4) deteriorated infrastructure resulting in decrease in quality of life and hampering socio-economic growth; 5) rising of groundwater level inside historical structures; 6) absence of plans for waste management; 7) poor security and safeguard of heritage sites resulting in trespassing on historical structures by misuse, demolition, wrong restorations, illegal construction activities, and so forth; 8) lack of studies related to structural assessment, safety evaluation and health monitoring of its historical structures; and finally 9) absence of plans for adaptive re-use of historical structures after restoration. All these problems are epitomized in Al-Ashraf street and its historical structures which makes it an ideal choice for the application of this study. The street is about 600m long starting near to Al-Sayeda Nafisa square and ending at the intersection with Ahmed Ibn Tolon street. It contains 8 historical structures dating back mainly to the Fatimid (969-1171) and Mamluk (1250-1517) periods and constructed primarily from stone and brick masonry; among them are the Domes of Al-Ashraf Khalil, Fatma Khatun and Shajar Al-Durr. In specific, the two domes of Al-Ashraf Khalil and Fatma Khatun are suffering from a series problems that may lead to their total loss if no action plans would be taken to conserve them. The research proposed in this project will be highly complementary to previous studies carried out for the conservation of Historic Cairo. In 2010, the URHC (Urban Regeneration of Historic Cairo) (urhcproject.org) was launched by the UNESCO-WHC to assist the Egyptian government in the management of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Historic Cairo. The URHC project, which was completed in 2014, was concerned with the whole of Historic Cairo. Its wide and overarching scale therefore did not enable detailed studies such as those related to groundwater studies, structural aspects, health monitoring and specific conservation plans, which are all dealt with in this proposal, to be addressed. In contrast, aspects such crafts, violations after the revolution of 25 January 2011, housing rehabilitations, are not given primary focus in this proposal. The proposed research will however make direct use of the findings and recommendations of the URHC study, particularly in terms of using GIS as a management tool, conducting surveys on the local population, and addressing the problem of waste management. Importantly, focusing on only one street within Historic Cairo will enable detailed conservation and intervention methodologies which incorporate disaggregated structural, groundwater, waste management and community-specific solutions to be developed.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-AH_R00787X_1

Start Date:

2018-11-30

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£168,696.92


Green Conservation of Cultural Heritage in Egypt

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

1.1. To create and develop an innovative means in the field of conservation of cultural heritage, regarding the disinfection and inhibition of bacteria and fungi colonizing the heritage objects. It is aimed at replacing the traditional harmful chemical and physical methods, due to the promising features of plant extracts and essential oils (PEEOs), resource effectiveness, availability, manageability and safety for both heritage materials and people either visitors or museum staff. 1.2. To rescue the selected bio-deteriorated buildings, stones, mural paintings, textiles, carpets and oil paintings heritage in Egypt, via documentation, identification of the components, treat, disinfect them from microbial colonizing, and museum display. 1.3. To establish a conservation laboratory in the Faculty of Arts, Damietta University, it will be the first one in Damietta and the surrounding governorates, aid teaching under- and post-graduates and facilitate high quality research by faculty staff and specialists. 1.4. To lead a strong awareness of the chemical and physical methodologies that are harmful to health, heritage and the environment, and to encourage others in all disciplines to harness nature and green materials. 1.5. To build capacity around a novel mean in heritage conservation in the UK and Egypt, and to exchange expertise in microbiology and conservation and initiate a sustainable co-operation. 1.6. To increase the financial income of the Egypt cultural heritage for a long-term through treatment and display of the selected deteriorated heritage. 1.7. To publish high quality articles in high impact-factor journals, which also promotes our universities ranking. 1.8. To develop connectivity and sustainable partnerships, exchange knowledge, expertise and cultures, and to build new academic partnerships between Egypt and the UK, indirectly contributing to cultural harmony, which is a priceless aim in the long-term.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-AH_R007926_1

Start Date:

2020-01-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£104,614.94


Monitoring Object and Visitor Environments (MOVE)

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Museums are repositories for our cultural heritage and are responsible for the care of precious collections for the benefit of present and future generations. Key to this stewardship role is the management of indoor conditions to prevent deterioration of vulnerable objects. Preventive control measures are required to keep the indoor climate within conservation limits by maintaining environmental conditions within certain parameters and by minimising environmental fluctuations. Visitors and staff also demand excellent thermal comfort, access to natural light and good air quality to enable them to access these collections. Conflicting environmental requirements often require a degree of compromise, and managing these environmental demands will become ever more challenging for museums as the impact of climate change leads to more frequent extreme weather conditions. Where environmental control and management systems in museums fail to respond to adverse and unstable climatic conditions vulnerable artefacts will inevitably deteriorate, and the need to accurately monitor microclimatic variations over time is fundamental to good museum practice. The safe preservation of cultural heritage is an essential mission of Egyptian museums where some of the world's most ancient and valuable artefacts are conserved (Ingo et al, 2015). The lack of environmental control programmes in the region is generally attributed to resource limitations and skills shortages, which often result in compromised indoor environmental quality leading to the accelerated deterioration of vulnerable objects. These risks can be mitigated with adequate knowledge of the indoor environmental parameters required for collections care and with robust and accurate monitoring programmes. New user-friendly methods of monitoring using cutting-edge technology are needed if Egyptian museums are to take action in response to changing external conditions and reduce the threat of damage to artefacts from extreme weather patterns. Our research project proposes to develop a visual live environmental dashboard of digital data that is aimed at assisting museum curators in achieving stable and controlled indoor conditions to address seasonal variations and unpredictable weather patterns. The project will contribute a new application for the use of real-time environmental data as a means of supporting actions to reduce risks to artefacts and improve comfort in visitor areas. A key principle of the digital platform will be its ease of use. One case study museum in Salford, UK and two in Cairo, Egypt, will provide the basis for prototyping the dashboard. Internal environmental parameters recorded at each site will be used to assess the performance of the case studies against relevant conservation requirements, comfort standards and energy benchmarks, and to develop a user-friendly prototype sensor management live dashboard that can be replicated in other museums across Egypt. The proposed dashboard will provide accurate measurements of a range of criteria including exposure and illumination in natural and artificial light, pollution levels (CO2 and dust particles), relative humidity, solar ultraviolet radiation, internal operative and air temperature, external temperature, and energy use figures. In-situ detailed live monitoring of this environmental data will inform decision-makers and staff on curation, exhibition design and safe storage environments while optimising consumption of resources.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-AH_R007810_1

Start Date:

2018-11-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£188,498.24




This site uses cookies

We use Google Analytics to measure how you use the website so we can improve it based on user needs. Google Analytics sets cookies that store anonymised information about how you got to the site, the internal pages you visit, how long you spend on each page and what you click on while you're visiting the site. Read more