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Improving international and national governance frameworks and business standards for intact forests and climate and biodiversity

Wildlife Conservation Society

The project will promote better outcomes for the climate, biodiversity and livelihoods values of intact forests and other ecosystems by ensuring they are fully represented in policy frameworks at national and international levels. The four components target (1) forest management frameworks in Republic of Congo and Gabon, (2) global public climate policy and finance frameworks, especially around the UNFCCC and CBD, (3) public and private sector regulations and guidance around forest-risk commodity supply chains and (4) guidance for protecting biodiversity in Chinese foreign direct investment. We will share credible scientific evidence through key consultation processes and facilitate fuller stakeholder involvement.

Programme identifier:

US-EIN-13-1740011-US-EIN-13-1740011-DFID-112106

Start Date:

2021-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£850,000


Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund Round 5

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

Illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is the fifth most lucrative transnational crime, worth up to £17bn a year globally. As well as threatening species with extinction, IWT destroys vital ecosystems. IWT also fosters corruption, feeds insecurity, and undermines good governance and the rule of law. The UK government is committed to tackling illegal trade of wildlife products. Defra manages the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, which is a competitive grants scheme with the objective of tackling illegal wildlife trade and, in doing so, contributing to sustainable development in developing countries. Projects funded under the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund address one, or more, of the following themes: • Developing sustainable livelihoods to benefit people directly affected by IWT • Strengthening law enforcement • Ensuring effective legal frameworks • Reducing demand for IWT products Over £23 million has been committed to 75 projects since the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund was established in 2013; five projects were awarded in 2014 (via applications to the Darwin Initiative), fourteen in 2015, fifteen in 2016, thirteen in 2017, fourteen in 2018 and in the latest round in 2019. This round of funding includes the following projects (details of which can be found at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/811381/iwt-project-list-2019.pdf)): IWT062, IWT063, IWT064, IWT065, IWT066, IWT067, IWT068, IWT069, IWT070, IWT071, IWT072, IWT073, IWT074, IWT075.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-7-IWTCF-R5

Start Date:

2019-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£4,588,554


Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund Round 3

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

Illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is the fifth most lucrative transnational crime, worth up to £17bn a year globally. As well as threatening species with extinction, IWT destroys vital ecosystems. IWT also fosters corruption, feeds insecurity, and undermines good governance and the rule of law. The UK government is committed to tackling illegal trade of wildlife products. Defra manages the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, which is a competitive grants scheme with the objective of tackling illegal wildlife trade and, in doing so, contributing to sustainable development in developing countries. Projects funded under the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund address one, or more, of the following themes: • Developing sustainable livelihoods to benefit people directly affected by IWT • Strengthening law enforcement • Ensuring effective legal frameworks • Reducing demand for IWT products Over £23 million has been committed to 75 projects since the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund was established in 2013; five projects were awarded in 2014 (via applications to the Darwin Initiative), fourteen in 2015, fifteen in 2016, thirteen in 2017, fourteen in 2018 and in the latest round in 2019. This round of funding includes the following projects (details of which can be found at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/811381/iwt-project-list-2019.pdf). The projects that a relevant for this area are IWT035 to IWT047.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-7-IWTCF-R3

Start Date:

2017-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£4,123,118


Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund Round 6

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

Illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is the fifth most lucrative transnational crime, worth up to £17bn a year globally. As well as threatening species with extinction, IWT destroys vital ecosystems. IWT also fosters corruption, feeds insecurity, and undermines good governance and the rule of law. The UK government is committed to tackling illegal trade of wildlife products. Defra manages the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, which is a competitive grants scheme with the objective of tackling illegal wildlife trade and, in doing so, contributing to sustainable development in developing countries. Projects funded under the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund address one, or more, of the following themes: • Developing sustainable livelihoods to benefit people directly affected by IWT • Strengthening law enforcement • Ensuring effective legal frameworks • Reducing demand for IWT products Over £26 million has been committed to 85 projects since the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund was established in 2013; five projects were awarded in 2014 (via applications to the Darwin Initiative), fourteen in 2015, fifteen in 2016, thirteen in 2017, fourteen in 2018 and thirteen in 2019 and ten in the latest round in 2020. (more info here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/919053/iwt-challenge-fund-list.pdf): IWT076, IWT077, IWT078, IWT082, IWT083, IWT079, IWT080, IWT081, IWT084, IWT085

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-7-IWTCF-R6

Start Date:

2020-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£3,417,064


Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund Round 4

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

Illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is the fifth most lucrative transnational crime, worth up to £17bn a year globally. As well as threatening species with extinction, IWT destroys vital ecosystems. IWT also fosters corruption, feeds insecurity, and undermines good governance and the rule of law. The UK government is committed to tackling illegal trade of wildlife products. Defra manages the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, which is a competitive grants scheme with the objective of tackling illegal wildlife trade and, in doing so, contributing to sustainable development in developing countries. Projects funded under the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund address one, or more, of the following themes: • Developing sustainable livelihoods to benefit people directly affected by IWT • Strengthening law enforcement • Ensuring effective legal frameworks • Reducing demand for IWT products Over £23 million has been committed to 75 projects since the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund was established in 2013; five projects were awarded in 2014 (via applications to the Darwin Initiative), fourteen in 2015, fifteen in 2016, thirteen in 2017, fourteen in 2018 and in the latest round in 2019. This round of funding includes the following projects (details of which can be found at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/811381/iwt-project-list-2019.pdf): IWT048, IWT049, IWT050, IWT051, IWT052, IWT053, IWT054, IWT055, IWT056, IWT057, IWT058, IWT059, IWT0760, IWT061.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-7-IWTCF-R4

Start Date:

2018-07-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£4,505,210


Development Priority Window (DPW)

International Initiative for Impact Evaluation

Funded by the UK's Department for International Development (DFID), this program conducts and commissions research into the development of more rigorous and systematic assessment of the impact of development policies and programmes

Programme identifier:

US-EIN-262681792-DPW

Start Date:

2015-08-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£6,000,000


Tackling Illegal Wildlife Trade Program

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

IWT Green Corridor- Tackling IWT as a serious organised crime: strengthening end to end law enforcement. Building coalitions: engaging the private sector, NGOs and academia; harnessing technology and innovation. Closing markets for illegally traded wildlife products: building on the Chinese ivory trade ban

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-1-300625

Start Date:

2018-10-08

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£2,885,000


GCRF_NF94: Identifying and mitigating the impacts of COVID-19 on legal and sustainable wildlife trade in LMICs

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

To contain COVID-19, there has been a clampdown on wildlife trade, which is a key source of livelihood and food security for hundreds of millions of people in LMICs. Wildlife markets have been closed, new bans on wildlife trade are being enforced and governments are proposing drastic changes to wildlife trade regulations. These reforms aim to safeguard global public health and global food systems, yet they disrupt wildlife supply chains that meet peoples' food security and economic needs. The clampdown on global wildlife trade also risks pushing trade underground with implications for public health, conservation and crime. The aim of this project is to develop evidence-based guidelines for regulating wildlife trade to address the risks of COVID-19 without undermining legal and sustainable wildlife trade economies. This project will use trade data, interviews and the Delphi method to: (1) track changing wildlife trade trends during the pandemic; (2) assess the impacts of these changing trends on people engaged in wildlife economies; and (3) formulate new guidelines for safe, legal and sustainable wildlife trade in the COVID-19 era. The project will be informed by evidence from Kenya and Cameroon - two LMICs with wildlife sectors that stand to be significantly impacted by COVID-19. This project will be led by an international, interdisciplinary team of wildlife trade, conservation and livelihood experts, and implemented in collaboration with CIFOR, an institute at the forefront of research on wildlife trade in LMICs. An Expert Impact Network (IUCN, IIED, TRAFFIC) has been established to realise impact.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-EP_V028162_1

Start Date:

2020-08-14

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£340,346.75


Conserving Tsavo’s wildlife by building community resilience and fostering coexistence

Zoological Society of London

Engaging two key communities on the northern boundary of Tsavo West & Tsavo East to reduce wildlife crime, habitat destruction etc through establishing VSLAs, water infrastructure, HWC mitigation.

Programme identifier:

GB-COH-RC000749-DWIN-FEC14-002

Start Date:

2019-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£121,734


Forest Governance, Markets and Climate (FGMC) Programme Extension - Programme Management

Pegasys Limited

The Forest Governance, Markets and Climate (FGMC) programme is the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office’s (FCDO) flagship global forestry initiative, with the broad aim of bringing about governance and market reforms that reduce the illegal use of forest resources and benefit poor people who depend on forests for their livelihoods. As part of global efforts to improve forest management and tackle deforestation, FGMC supports international policy processes which tackle illegal logging in timber-producing developing countries and the trade in illegally produced timber products. FGMC’s original business case, which ran from 2011 to 2020 with a total budget of £250 million funded from the UK’s International Climate Fund (ICF), has been granted an extension running from April 2021 to March 2023

Programme identifier:

GB-COH-10333897-FGMC

Start Date:

2020-11-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£22,293,108


Funding to build capacity and support cross-border action on the conservation of wildlife within countries in the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA)

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

The funding will be used to support KAZA countries to develop African-led trans-frontier approaches to support conservation of wildlife, including iconic species such as elephants through efforts in integrated land-use planning, human-wildlife conflict mitigation, community livelihoods and illegal wildlife trade. This funding will be used to provide technical assistance and build capacity within the KAZA countries to address areas for immediate action, provide a foundation for future work programmes and support access to wider funding options.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-7-IWT-KAZA01

Start Date:

2019-09-04

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,000,000


Darwin Initiative Round 23

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

The Darwin Initiative is a UK government grants scheme that helps to protect biodiversity and the natural environment through locally based projects worldwide. The initiative funds projects that help countries rich in biodiversity but poor in financial resources to meet their objectives under one or more of the biodiversity conventions. The objective is to to address threats to biodiversity such as: - habitat loss or degradation - climate change - invasive species - over-exploitation - pollution and eutrophication.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-7-DAR23

Start Date:

2018-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£7,619,619


Towards Convivial Conservation: Governing Human-Wildlife Interactions in the Anthropocene

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

CON-VIVA is grounded in the premise that conservation is critical to transformations to sustainability but that its practices need to change radically. Conservation can be effective in protecting biodiversity in places, but in toto has failed to halt global biodiversity loss. Continued habitat fragmentation and reduced funding during times of austerity compound this problem. Many conservationists now acknowledge this, leading to vigorous 'Anthropocene' discussions on how to reconfigure human-wildlife relations, protected areas and the role of economic development in conservation. CON-VIVA's key objective is to conceptually refine and empirically test the prospects for one proposal emerging from these debates: convivial conservation. This new model responds to the T2S themes by moving beyond protected areas and faith in markets to build landscape, governance and funding pathways that integrate conservation and poverty reduction, while enhancing prosperity. CON-VIVA investigates the prospects for convivial conservation by comparing cutting-edge conservation cases that address human-wildlife conflict involving apex predators in Finland, USA and DAC-countries Brazil and Tanzania. Our hypothesis is that if 'living with' apex predators can be effectively combined with new forms of economic development, a transition to convivial conservation can be boosted significantly. By organising the project around integrated academic-practitioner networks on local and global levels, we will better understand the conditions for this transition, while conceptualising and popularising a new model for conservation. This allows CON-VIVA to contribute to SDG15 and to inspire and enhance broader transformations to sustainability. CAN YOU READ THIS?

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-ES_S007792_1

Start Date:

2018-12-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


Darwin Initiative Round 26

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

The Darwin Initiative is a UK government grants scheme that helps to protect biodiversity and the natural environment through locally based projects worldwide. The initiative funds projects that help countries rich in biodiversity but poor in financial resources to meet their objectives under one or more of the biodiversity conventions. The objective is to to address threats to biodiversity such as: - habitat loss or degradation - climate change - invasive species - over-exploitation - pollution and eutrophication

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-7-DAR26

Start Date:

2020-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£5,607,898


Living with Wildlife

Send a Cow

Livelihoods, Conservation, Murchison Falls, Uganda

Programme identifier:

GB-CHC-299717-UG0002

Start Date:

2020-10-15

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,314,472.92


Pathogen exchange at the human wildlife interface - a comprehensive molecular study on vector-borne disease in rural Sulawesi.

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The rural poor, the wildlife they encounter and the potential exchange of pathogens between humans and wildlife is not known in much of the world, including Sulawesi, yet emerging infections of zoonotic origin that become epidemic and pandemic are feared. The collaborative molecular study proposed here focuses on emerging mosquito-borne infections with the fundamental goal to discover pathogen exchange where humans and wild Sulawesi macaques share habitat. The UK PI has a strong track record in this field as co-investigator and investigator in ground breaking molecular research that lead to the discovery and characterization of zoonotic malaria in the human population in Malaysian Borneo. Plasmodium knowlesi, a malaria parasite of macaque monkeys, had entered the human population and as a result of that work is now recognised as the 5th type of malaria in humans. The Indonesian PI is a clinically qualified medical entomologist with special interest in mosquito vectors of disease. He has extensive field research experience and is based in Hasanuddin University, Sulawesi. By joining their expertise and that of key co-investigators and collaborators, with particular expertise in patient recruitment in remote rural Borneo (CJD) and wildlife veterinary research (DKS) they plan to investigate, for the first time, pathogen transmission, particularly malaria transmission, within and between the unique Sulawesi macaque species and remote rural populations. Clinical, pathogen, mosquito, and wildlife data will be generated from study sites where rural populations share habitat with the Sulawesi macaques. The expected primary outcomes are: 1) to describe the clinical impact and molecular fingerprint of vector-borne pathogens transmitted within remote rural populations in Sulawesi; 2) to identify mosquito vector species and the pathogen genotypes they transmit between humans at each location; 3) to catalogue mosquito vectors that feed on, and vector-borne pathogens harboured by macaque troops, that overlap with humans at each location; 4)compare pathogen genetic fingerprints generated from mosquito vectors, macaque and human hosts to determine pathogen crossover events between hosts, particularly zoonotic crossover from macaque monkeys to humans and 5) develop location-specific tools and strategies for the Indonesian department of health and local communities to use to pre-empt emerging vector-borne zoonoses. The information generated by this study will immediately inform measures to reduce vector-borne infections and improve health and wellbeing of the study populations, by definition the remote rural poor. The study protocol could be used as a template for similar study in the region. The approach is internationally competitive molecular research (genetics, genomics and bioinformatics) and the partnership will foster human resource and capacity strengthening in cutting-edge infectious disease research in Indonesia. Our ODA compliant study when viewed through the lens of the sustainable development goals (SDG's) will contribute to Goal 1 - Ending poverty that includes ensuring that the poor and vulnerable have access to basic services - including health. Goal 3 Health - that includes ending neglected tropical diseases and malaria. Goal 8 - decent job creation, in this case through building expertise in the bio-medical research sector in Sulawesi and Goal 17 Partnerships - achieving the SDG's through sustainable equal partnerships.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-MR_S01991X_1

Start Date:

2019-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£335,782.54


Protecting Mongolia’s Gobi Desert for wild camels and herder communities

Zoological Society of London

This landscape is currently threatened by a host of environmental and social issues, including: overgrazing by livestock; habitat degradation and waterhole loss, exacerbated by climate change; domestic-wild camel cross-breeding; and manmade barriers to long-distance wildlife migration. Indigenous herder livelihoods are equally vulnerable to climate change, water scarcity and rangeland degradation. Government and communities alike have lacked mechanisms and resources to collaborate across this vast landscape to share knowledge, experience, and tackle threats.

Programme identifier:

GB-COH-RC000749-DWIN-ASC18-002

Start Date:

2021-07-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£497,146


Reversing Environmental Degradation in Africa and Asia (REDAA) - Innovative research for the environment, livelihoods and wildlife.

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office

This programme focuses on addressing the challenge of environmental degradation in Africa and Asia - seeking to improve the condition of natural landscapes in ways that enable people and nature to thrive together. REDAA will expand the technical knowledge and evidence base for environmental restoration and sustainable natural resources management in Africa and Asia; and develop innovative solutions that address serious environmental challenges and support the design and implementation of sustainable livelihoods strategies for local communities.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-1-300760

Start Date:

2019-08-30

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£35,050,000


Securing Chitwan-Sindhuli Green Corridor; strengthening community stewardship and law enforcement

Zoological Society of London

This project aims to address these challenges by: 1) strengthening capacity and improving transboundary LE coordination, and 2) building capacity of newly established provincial LE agencies by enabling data sharing and intra-agency enforcement efforts to disrupt priority IWT trafficking routes and international wildlife crime through Nepal. 3) by securing community stewardship at key pangolin source sites outside the PA network, through proven Community Management Pangolin Conservation Areas (CMPCAs) which empower communities to manage their community forests, protect pangolins and participate with LE agencies 4) improving well-being through community-led sustainable livelihood schemes, promoting gender equity and social inclusion, increasing local economic and ecological resilience, further “future-proofing” community engagement.

Programme identifier:

GB-COH-RC000749-IWTC-ASC50-003

Start Date:

2021-09-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£548,287


GCRF Trade, Development and the Environment Hub

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Our GCRF TRADE Hub addresses a global challenge that has led to dramatic decline in biodiversity and ecosystem resilience in the past century, and if not addressed will significantly imperil the development of lower income nations. Trade in wildlife and agricultural commodities from low and middle income to higher income countries has increased rapidly over the last decades, and is projected to expand rapidly into the future to meet demands. Although trade is vital for national development, it also can carry heavy environmental and social costs, particularly for poor rural people in DAC countries, mainly because there is a great imbalance of power within the decision-making system and the most affected people are relatively powerless and voiceless in the decision-making process. The development of these trades over the past decades have has also resulted in considerable impacts on natural systems, threatening with extinction thousands of species globally. Addressing the issue of balancing the positives of ever-expanding trade with its costs is essential to addressing several of the SDGs, to protect and promote livelihoods within vulnerable communities in DAC countries, and is important for the UK in terms of negotiating sustainable trade deals that also meet other environmental and social development commitments. The Hub will work on a number of key trade flows that are particularly important to our focal developing countries and the UK, and where we have existing strengths that will allow us to have real impact in the lifetime of the Hub. This will include trade that has a direct impact on biodiversity - for example the global trade in wildlife for a range of uses, including the regional and national trade in wild meat. It will also include agricultural commodity trades that have indirect impacts on biodiversity through conversion or degradation of habitats. Its strong international and interdisciplinary research team, including economists, trade modellers, political scientists, ecologists and development scientists, will produce novel, impact-orientated research. Through involving companies, UN-related trade bodies and governments, the project will be embedded in the needs of the economy and development at large. We have ten work packages: During the project design phase WP0 will further elaborate a detailed theory of change and mapping exercise leading to the co-design of the research programme with critical stakeholders (private sector actors, trade organisations and NGOs). This will lead into the delivery of eight interlinked work packages: WP1: Understanding wildlife trade from DAC countries (live animals, skins, non-timber products, wildmeat) at the supply end; volumes and characteristics of local and export trade, and impacts on biodiversity and resource users; WP2: Understanding supply to demand-end agricultural commodity trade pathways, volumes and characteristics, within and exported from DAC countries; WP3: Determining the magnitude and spatial-temporal distribution of social benefits and costs for selected wildlife and commodity supply chains from the supply to demand ends; WP4: Understanding how trade and economic policies impact on wild-sourced and agricultural commodity trades and their impact on people and nature; WP5: Modelling the implementation of different scenarios of trade policy and corporate decision making; WP6: Developing solutions and building capacity through engagement with the private sector (large corporations and investors); WP7: Developing solutions and building capacity, through engaging with trade public sector rule-setting agencies and national policy makers; WP8: Outreach and Technology Solutions. We also have a cross-cutting WP9: building DAC partner capacity to ensure ongoing, sustainable research-led solutions to TRADE's intractable challenge. We involved DAC countries, corporations, investment bodies, and UN-linked trade agencies in the co-design of this Hub from the outset.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-ES_S008160_1

Start Date:

2019-02-13

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£18,239,311.48




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