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Now showing projects 1 - 20 of 23

NIHR Global Health Research Groups: research call 2

UK - Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC)

1) Deliver the UK's ambition to be internationally outstanding in global health research, improving the lives of people in LMIC. 2) Create an environment where world-class global health research, focused on the needs of LMIC can thrive. 3) Translate advances in applied global health research into benefits for patients and the public in LMIC. 4) Focus on priority areas which will have the greatest impact on health in LMIC in the short, medium and long term. 5) Provide high quality research evidence to inform decision-making by public health officials, practitioners and policy makers. 6) Increase the volume and quality of multi-disciplinary global health research from the UK. 7) Develop knowledge and capacity within existing UK institutions which can be translated into global health research practice.

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-10-NIHR_GHRG2
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
01-04-2018
Total Budget:
£43,753,616


Darwin Initiative Round 24

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

The Darwin Initiative is a UK government grants scheme that helps to protect biodiversity and the natural environment through locally based projects worldwide. The initiative funds projects that help countries rich in biodiversity but poor in financial resources to meet their objectives under one or more of the biodiversity conventions. The objective is to to address threats to biodiversity such as: - habitat loss or degradation - climate change - invasive species - over-exploitation - pollution and eutrophication

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-7-DAR24
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
01-04-2018
Total Budget:
£10,604,188


Darwin Initiative Round 25

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

The Darwin Initiative is a UK government grants scheme that helps to protect biodiversity and the natural environment through locally based projects worldwide. The initiative funds projects that help countries rich in biodiversity but poor in financial resources to meet their objectives under one or more of the biodiversity conventions. The objective is to to address threats to biodiversity such as: - habitat loss or degradation - climate change - invasive species - over-exploitation - pollution and eutrophication

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-7-DAR25
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
01-04-2019
Total Budget:
£8,314,952


Emergency flood planning and management using unmanned aerial systems

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

The measurable project objectives are: 1) to develop a computationally-efficient urban flood prediction model to identify locations vulnerable to flooding, generate emergency evacuation routes and update them as a flood progresses; 2) to evaluate specific unmanned areal systems (UASs) in the laboratory and in the field to determine and demonstrate how to most efficiently gather on-site information at an appropriate level of resolution and update frequency before, during and after flooding; 3) to determine what data can be obtained (e.g. spatial extent of flooding, depth) and what sensors (e.g. vision, LiDAR) can be used in which operating conditions; 4) to develop a framework which integrates the in-situ data and other sources of information (e.g. aerial, satellite) with the flood models to create a refined prediction over a finite time horizon; 5) to develop robust command and control solutions to overcome limitations and challenges pertaining to the use of UASs to collect near real-time data (within 2 hours) from on board sensors; 6) to develop a safe 'anytime, anywhere' vision-based landing capability for the UASs to ensure vehicle recovery if a mission needs to be aborted; 7) to determine how multiple, heterogeneous support resources made available by different relief agencies for disparate tasks may be coordinated in an optimal manner respecting spatial, temporal and operational constraints; 8) to develop a prototype decision support system (DSS) which interfaces with the empirical data received from the UASs and the mathematical models, to (convey visually) and intuitively information to emergency responders during and after flooding to facilitate effective decision making; 9) to demonstrate the capabilities of the prototype DSS tool in India; 10) to develop capacity and engage users in emergency flood planning and management.

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-EP_P02839X_1
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
01-05-2017
Total Budget:
£1,494,248


BioResilience: Biodiversity resilience and ecosystem services in post-conflict socio-ecological systems in Colombia

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

The project will deliver a step-change in the understanding of ecosystem evolution, socio-cultural dimensions of biodiversity conservation, infrastructures of local knowledge, and degrees of ecosystem resilience to past and present disturbance in the Boyaca and Cundinamarca landscapes. This combined information will be used to improve understanding and management to enhance the human modified systems for the benefit of a suite of stakeholders. The results have a wide range of impacts, e.g., for future improvements of DGVMs, to inform policy and forest management strategies, and for poverty alleviation through improved resource management. Our project will answer 5 research questions: Q1: Baseline and historical ecosystem response: What was the baseline Colombian forest vegetation and how has it responded to historical drivers of change (e.g. fire, climate, land-use degradation)? Q2: Present land-cover and land-use change: How do the properties and function (including C storage in soil and vegetation, forest structure, composition and functional diversity) of human-modified socio-ecological systems vary, especially with regard to fire, in comparison to 'intact' or less-modified systems? Q3: Using past resilience to determine the resilience of modern forests: What are the main factors, including tree traits and soil, which affect resistance and resilience to disturbance and changing climate in contemporary forests? Q4: Scaling to the wider landscape: How are resistance and resilience to climate change and disturbance (from Q1&3) for current vegetation ecosystem services and biodiversity (from Q2) distributed across the landscape? Q5: The future of forests in a socio-ecological context: What are the key changes needed to manage, conserve, and promote the sustainable use of forest ecosystems in a manner that provides maximum benefit to communities and their organisations? The following objectives will address these questions: O1: Ecological baselines and historical change: Determine long-term baseline ecological data spanning decades to millennia through the development of vegetation and fire reconstructions from lake sedimentary sequences and soil profiles. O2: Present ecosystem drivers and function: Evaluate determinants of socio-cultural values of ecosystem services and ecosystem function with regard to fire, climate, and management in Boyaca and Cundinamarca provinces. O3: Ecosystem resilience: Evaluate changes in modern ecosystems relative to their ecological baseline from lowland to upper Andean forests and identify the levels of ecosystem resilience to past environmental variability and land-use intensification during the 19th and 20th century. O4: Developing and advancing integrated and sustainable ecosystem use: Co-develop transformation pathways that integrate emerging biophysical data relating to forest environments into rural communities' livelihood strategies, concerns and perspectives, including identification of effective practices for fire management, ecosystem restoration and agricultural approaches.

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-NE_R017980_1
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
01-08-2018
Total Budget:
£945,389


Resilient Integrated-Coupled FOW platform design methodology (ResIn)

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

The proposed research brings together the research strengths from the UK and China in collaboration with leading organisations and industry partners to design resilient floating offshore Renewable Energy (ORE) systems with a focus towards floating wind, that withstand the extreme typhoon conditions in China. The vision of the project is to establish an enhanced met ocean characterisation for the South China Sea, allowing to inform the development of a resilient and robust approach for ORE systems enabling industrial readiness. With the main aim directed towards floating offshore wind (FOW), innovative porous offshore wind platforms will be assessed to determine effective configurations of designs, and associated damping mechanisms through mooring systems and wave absorption. The proposal will explore advanced numerical modelling approaches that account for complex coupled behaviour, yet are efficient enough to support engineering iterations. The effective identification of spatial and temporal environmental extreme events will be fundamental for robust and efficient designs. The engineering focus lies on the quantification and validation of the load reduction potential of the novel floating offshore wind platform innovations, which have been promising in early preliminary studies by the applicants. The detailed environmental load assessment combined with novel engineering design, advanced coupled computational modelling and risk-based optimisation methods will provide an understanding of the nonlinear coupled response behaviour and how novel platform design can reduce these extreme loadings to foster more resilient and economical floating offshore wind installations. The FOW designs will be evaluated through a risk-based design optimisation algorithm to tailor the configurations to the level of environmental exposure and acceptable risk. Whilst the primary benefits will be realised in China there are also clear benefits to the UK, in that the future offshore floating development will very likely be delivered in partnership with UK plc companies that are already very active in the offshore wind sector and are very supportive of the proposed work, as it offers innovative design solutions and interesting routes to a dynamic market. Specific objectives of this proposal are: i) to assess the offshore floating wind environmental conditions in detail to inform the engineering design and computational modelling, as well as the strategic electricity infrastructure planning; ii) to enable innovations and address barriers hindering the industrial roll-out of FOW in China through fundamental collaborative research; iii) to develop advanced numerical modelling for complex coupled aero-hydro-elastic behaviour of floating offshore wind turbines employing CFD and PIC methods; iv) to optimise floating offshore wind installations for typhoon-prone areas, assessing the configuration and stability of aero-hydro-elastic coupled floating offshore systems in Chinese environmental conditions; v) to develop an integrated design methodology for floating offshore wind platforms that yields more resilient and robust designs, using risk-based reliability methods; vi) to establish an Innovation network spanning research and industry through capacity building and targeted UK-China industry forums; vii) to establish a UK-China Centre for Offshore Energy (UKC-COE) with the remit of enabling environmental friendly energy generation in an international development context.

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-EP_R007519_1
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
03-07-2017
Total Budget:
£811,975


University of Exeter GCRF Global Research Translation Award: Sustainable Solutions to Food Security Challenges

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Exeter's GRTA primary aim is to maximise opportunities for its GCRF Food Security Portfolio to develop and deliver sustainable social and economic development solutions at scale across DAC country terrestrial and marine environments. Food security is a core component of Exeter's strategic research investments and impact-programmes, and is central to Exeter's commitment to Global Challenges Research and Innovation. Since the launch of the GCRF, Exeter has established an interdisciplinary portfolio of GCRF challenge-led Food Security awards. This cross-cuts Exeter's interdisciplinary colleges and institutes, and intersects thematic areas of marine, plastics (environmental and human health impacts), agriculture, climate change, conflict and education. Objectives include: 1) Strategic value-adding investment in Exeter's GCRF and ODA Food Security Portfolio. 2) Delivering a flexible approach to funding that enables incremental, adaptive GRTA project learning and innovation. 3) Leveraging programme management and commercialisation experience gained in delivery of UKRI and HEFCE innovation funding. 4) Co-designing sustainable Food Security solutions by investing in long-term, interdisciplinary and equitable partnerships with DAC country non-academic and academic organisations. 5) Leveraging external funding to a value of 10:1.

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-EP_T015268_1
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
01-10-2019
Total Budget:
£621,951


Imagining Futures through Un/Archived Pasts

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Imagining Futures aims to articulate egalitarian archival practice in post-conflict, reconstruction and displacement contexts, and test its transferability, in promoting social cohesion. The objectives are interdependent: moving from local to global contexts, and from grounded knowledge to its contribution to wider more transferable methodologies. 1) To use the intrinsic power of the archive for its capacity to build confidence, reveal co-existing narratives, enhance understanding, empathy, and thus reduce inter/intra-community conflict among diverse social, political, religious, economic, and regional groups, enhancing the potential for sustainable peace (SDG 11/16). 2) Create a network of equitable partnerships of academics, archivists, historians, archaeologists, architects, urban-planners, geographers, practitioners, authorities, NGOs, educators, and community stakeholders related to memory institutions and community development. 3) Create a network, committed to sensitive and meaningful dialogues with communities, that outlast the project, linking inter-disciplinary research and expertise that draw on distinct geo-political contexts where the need for new imaginaries is urgent, including in Refugee Camps and ODA countries of Tanzania, Lebanon, Ghana, South Africa and Syria. 4) Create and activate archives as sites of discourse, engaging minority and marginalised groups, to enhance and disseminate methodologies of reading archives against the grain, to subvert conventional epistemologies and challenge dominant or exclusionary narratives, by bringing out diverse voices and exposing archival formation as a result of multiple histories and intersecting lives. 5) Develop and facilitate the physical creation of diverse archives and approaches, as propositions for a methodology of their preservation, and related heritage (SDG 10/11.4), as a pathway to an inclusive Archive for the Future. 6) Produce guidelines on site-sensitive practices, for activating existing archives and creating new ones, their engagement, storage, dissemination and accessibility. This will advocate for culture's role in building just, peaceful, inclusive societies and for its official recognition as a humanitarian need. 7) Generate policy papers and ethical guidelines, for future creation, use, and custodianship of archives, for application by international organisations such as OSCE, ICCROM, and UNESCO, to ensure archiving practices do not serve as acts of intrusion, dis-empowerment and control. Instead, guide organisations to use their platforms, to educate and re-frame thinking on value across supra-state organisations, NGOs and memory institutions. 8) Create agile solutions of diverse mediums and scales to share new archiving methods. The project's own archiving and tools will serve as experiment and model. 9) Expose the impact of the colonial, western, male gaze - historically pervasive, in the subject of the archived and its form (e.g. visual/text-based) - in framing policies of preservation and reconstruction. 10) Increase mobility of people and ideas, through the Network, creating a bridge and partnerships between Middle East and Africa (SDG 17.14/17), and across: 1) recovering communities in conflict zones and postcolonial contexts; 2) organisations, communities and enterprises within contexts of displacement; 3) researchers, across humanities and other fields, as architecture, urban-planning, those in memory institutions and practitioners; 4) government and supra-state organisations. 11) Provide guidelines for international aid and investment on the importance of drawing on a wide knowledge-base of local actors. To ensure well-meaning initiatives are contextually sensitive and do not fuel violence by rupturing links between communities' lived/intangible and tangible heritage. 12) Push the potential of the humanities by activating it spatially through an intersection with architecture, urban design, and memory.

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-AH_T008199_1
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
01-04-2020
Total Budget:
£589,119


Intervention Co-creation to Improve Community-based Food Production and Household Nutrition in Small Island Developing States (ICoFaN)

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

One in five members of the United Nations are small island developing states (SIDS): 38 countries with a combined population of 61 million. The majority of these are poor, eligible for official development assistance, and over a quarter are 'least developed' countries. They have high burdens of malnutrition, including overweight and obesity alongside anaemia in women of reproductive age, and additionally some, such as Haiti, also have high burdens of childhood stunting. Over the past 3 decades malnutrition in SIDS has been exacerbated by an increasing reliance on food imports, the majority of which are of low nutritional quality. SIDS Governments have committed to increasing the local production and consumption of nutritious food as a way of increasing food security and sovereignty and addressing the high burden of malnutrition related morbidity and mortality. This proposal is intended to add to the evidence base and research capacity to support these policy commitments. The proposal builds on the Community Food and Health (CFaH) project (MRC grant no. MR/P025250/1). CFaH aimed to develop methods and collect pilot data to inform further work on the relationships between locally owned or managed food production initiatives, their contribution to local dietary quality, and identify potential facilitators and barriers to increasing their contribution to improved dietary quality. This formative work was undertaken in St Vincent and the Grenadines (SVG) and Fiji, where we now propose to engage local stakeholders and work with two very well established and local NGOs to develop and evaluate interventions. In addition, the proposal incorporates new work to address the burdens of malnutrition in Haiti, the poorest country in the western hemisphere. Aim: To co-create and evaluate community and household level interventions aimed at improving local food production and nutrition. This will be informed by evidence reviews and participatory model building to map local food systems and take a gender-sensitive approach. Objectives: 1. To systematically identify, collate and appraise published and grey literature on: a. Interventions in small island developing states designed to improve nutrition through improved consumption of local foods; b. The dietary intakes, nutritional status, and sources of food consumed in Fiji, SVG and Haiti; c. The nutritional value of locally produced and consumed foods in Fiji, SVG and Haiti. 2. In each country, to engage with stakeholders from across the food value chain and including government policy makers in order to: a. Create a map of the food system and its relationship to the double burden of malnutrition, with a focus on vulnerable population groups; b. Identify systemic barriers and facilitators (including current policy environments) to increasing production and the consumption of healthy local foods. 3. In Fiji and SVG, to use the findings from the first two objectives to work with the Foundation for Rural Integration and Enterprise Development (FRIEND) and Richmond Vale Academy respectively in order to design and implement interventions aimed at improving household nutrition. 4. In SVG and Fiji, to evaluate the short term (12 to 16 months) effects of the interventions on dietary quality, food security, sources of food consumed and household expenditure. 5. In Haiti, to undertake pilot work to design and evaluate the feasibility of an intervention aimed at improving local food production and household nutrition.

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-BB_T008857_1
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
14-02-2020
Total Budget:
£502,763


Fate and Management of Emerging Contaminants (FAME)

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

This inter-disciplinary proposal aims to study the sources and fate of emerging contaminants and their interactions in receiving waters and wastewater treatment facilities, and to develop novel and sustainable management strategies for improved water quality. To achieve this ambitious aim the following objectives are proposed: 1) Monitoring of the fate and interaction of ECs in surface water; river beds, aquatic life, groundwater and existing WWT plants; 2) Co-development of cost effective fit-for-purpose solutions for the treatment of ECs in urban and rural communities using new approaches such as graphene based polymer composites, and innovations in advanced oxidation processes coupled with chemical free treatment with pulsed power and energy efficient membranes 3) Development of an "open access" novel decision support system capable of automatically generating and identifying optimal sustainable water management strategies meeting end users needs and contexts; and 4) End user engagement and impact generation.

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-NE_R003548_1
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
30-01-2018
Total Budget:
£456,905


Improving agroforestry and silvopastoral systems in Latin America by maximising species and genetic diversity of the multipurpose legume Inga

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Overall To build techniques and research partnerships spanning from genomics to social forestry, which can deliver more productive, sustainable agroforestry and silvopastoral systems (AF/SPS) in Brazil using native, nitrogen fixing Inga (Leguminosae-Mimosoideae) tree species. Specific (i) Apply next-generation, hybrid-capture sequencing techniques to identify close relatives of Inga species already utilised in agroforestry. (ii) Develop molecular markers for interpreting genetic diversity within wild and cultivated populations of Inga species. (iii) Sample 5 geographically paired wild and cultivated populations of the widely utilised species Inga edulis across the Brazilian Amazon and use the markers developed in (ii) to study their genetic diversity. (iv) Build a network to field-trial previously unused Inga species and more genetically diverse populations of species already used in AF/SPS.

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-BB_P022898_1
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
01-05-2018
Total Budget:
£421,529


[Thailand] ENRICH: ENhancing ResIlienCe to future Hydro-meteorological extremes in the Mun river basin in Northeast of Thailand

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

RESEARCH AIM The overarching aim of this project is to understand the impact of the combined stressors of climate variability, climate change and land-use change on hydro-meteorological extremes in the Mun River Basin and to recommend adaptation measures to enable sustainable management of water resources and improve water security in the coming decades. This will be achieved by: - Exploiting state-of-the-art global climate model simulations to advance our understanding of drivers of meteorological and climate variability and change in Thailand. The focus will be on changes in mean rainfall, monsoon systems and variability associated with the El Niño Southern Oscillation and the Madden Julian Oscillation. - Using the output from state-of-the-art climate models and land-use change scenarios to drive hydrological models that combine information from hydro-meteorological and land-use stressors to quantify future changes in hydrological extremes. - Assessing vulnerability and risk for these combined stressors and produce recommendations for adaptation. OBJECTIVES 1.1 Gather and process all available information and data on recent land-use changes in the Mun river basin and collect information about population trends in the basin. 1.2 Obtain the latest plans for both agricultural development and urban growth in the basin until 2050. 1.3 Create a series of possible land-use change scenarios in the basin. 2.1 Perform a process-based evaluation of the ability of CMIP6 models to simulate the mean climate in Northeast of Thailand. Models assessed will include both standard (DECK) and high-resolution (HighResMIP) versions. Metrics will be developed that evaluate key aspects of large-scale model climate and their driving processes e.g. monsoon flows. 2.2 Extend the assessment of mean climate evaluation to assess the MJO and ENSO in CMIP6 models using DECK and ScenarioMIP experiments and the impact of MJO and extreme ENSO events on Northeast Thailand rainfall. Adopt the same process-based philosophy as in 2.1. 2.3 Provide an assessment of future changes in mean, variability and rainfall extremes in Northeast Thailand as derived from the new CMIP6 models and simulations linked to their ability to simulate present-day climate. A time horizon of 2050 will be the focus due to its relevance for adaptation planning and actions. 3.1 Evaluate impacts of climate variability and land-use change on streamflow and hydrological extremes, and hydrologic alteration. 3.2 Evaluate the combined impacts of climate change and ENSO on agricultural and hydro-meteorological droughts and its consequences under different land-use scenarios. 4.1 Synthesise the results of the land-use, climate and extremes work packages (WP1-3) and produce an assessment of future risks from these factors. 4.2 Develop vulnerability and risk maps for drought as derived from the new CMIP6 model simulations and future development in the Mun River Basin. 4.3 Provide an accessible assessment of adaptation strategies and measures for drought risk reduction management in the basin.

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-NE_S002901_1
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
01-10-2018
Total Budget:
£383,765


Migration, Transformation and Sustainability

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

The objectives are: - To expand knowledge of transformations by incorporating migration dynamics, specifically: the impact of aggregate flows of people on sustainability; the consequences of individual level lifecourse dimensions of mobility and sustainability; and the governance of migration and its consequences for sustainability. - To integrate this new knowledge with methodological innovation into planning processes and strategies for sustainable transitions. - To build capacity for the migration-environment research community to engage in research on transformational challenges.

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-ES_S007687_1
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
01-12-2018
Total Budget:
£338,493


[Malaysia] IMpacts of PRecipitation from Extreme StormS - Malaysia (IMPRESS - Malaysia)

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

IMPRESS will combine novel storm compositing techniques developed at Exeter and Reading with land use and hydrological modelling developed at USM to provide detailed and physically based assessments of future flood and drought risk in Malaysia. These science outputs will then be employed to inform intervention strategies based on a greatly enhanced understanding of hydro-meteorological extremes in Malaysia's future climate. The key, over-arching objective of IMPRESS is to deliver a step-change in our understanding of hydro-meteorological extremes in Malaysia, their impacts and the strategies available to adapt to these changes. In pursuit of this, we will produce research which satisfies the following, inter-related, objectives: (1) To apply storm compositing techniques to derive a detailed, dynamically constrained understanding of the ability of state-of-the-art climate models to represent the key events which generate extreme precipitation in Peninsular Malaysia. (2) To derive projections of changes in those events from future climate scenarios using those climate models. (3) To apply that output, combined with detailed land use change projections that will be developed as part of IMPRESS, to drive a hydrological model (SWAT) and to provide estimates of future changes in streamflow in two Malaysian river basins. This information will provide information of unprecedented detail to key stakeholders, and the wider public, on future risk associated with changes in hydro-meteorological extremes. (4) To use this information to assess current intervention strategies for hydro-meteorological extremes and to generate a comprehensive model of flood management which takes into account future change in river flow and precipitation. (5) To engage with key stakeholders in the Malaysian government, civil society, academic community and wider society to communicate the outcomes of this research and to provide relevant data produced by IMPRESS to those stakeholders.

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-NE_S002707_1
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
01-01-2019
Total Budget:
£266,607


A cultural landscape approach to improve governance of pastoral food systems in East Africa and Beyond

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Creating productive, sustainable, and inclusive pastoral food systems in East African rangelands requires understanding the people and practices of the people that make their living in these regions. Given the nature of the challenges and the geographic scales over which they play out the overall objective of this project is to establish a network of researchers with different backgrounds and expertise and connect them further with both the communities affected by these challenges, and the policy makers who can facilitate solutions to these challenges. Through this process we aim to redress evidence hierarchies both in terms of enabling the voice of pastoralist communities to reach a wider audience, and by enabling research to be led by Kenyan and East African academics, NGOs, and policy practitioners throughout the project. The specific aims of the work carried out during the lifetime of the current project are to: 1) Give voice to pastoral communities and document the challenges pastoral communities and food production systems are facing due to climate change and other anthropogenic changes. We will achieve this through community-based participatory research which will result in the production of a photovoice exhibit and the publishing of the stories of people in pastoral communities (including those from under-represented groups such as women and young, unmarried men). 2) Better understand the interplay between the different scales and patterns of land use and interactions between different communities and cultures, and how traditional pastoral cultural practices can be incorporated into more effective rangeland management. We will achieve this by conducting interview and focus group discussion with communities and reporting the findings. 3) Examine the cultural and psychological factors that affect whether inclusive and sustainable conservancies are effectively adopted by pastoral communities. We will conduct comparative social-psychological questionnaires and report what factors either promote or inhibit positive baehaviour changes, and make suggestions about how this can feed in to strategies to establish effective governance of rangelands. 4) Connect pastoral communities, academic researchers and policy makers so that research can be targeted to the issues affecting communities. We will write policy briefing notes based on this research so that effective policy interventions can be devised. The Longer term aims for this research are to establish an initial evidence base upon which future research plans and funding applications can be developed. As part of this process we will seek to extend the network and explore how approaches to establishing inclusive and sustainable governance of food systems in this region can be adapted and applied to enhance pastoralist and other food production systems in other DAC-listed countries. It is hoped that the research begun in this project will eventually lead to positive policy changes that produce real-world positive impacts on the lives of pastoralists by establishing more inclusive forms of governance, increasing food security, reducing poverty, and conserving ecosystems and their services.

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-AH_T004282_1
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
31-12-2019
Total Budget:
£173,376


Transdisciplinary data assemblages for a socio-historical understanding of the formation of Caribbean food systems

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Research questions How can transdisciplinary socio-historical data be systematically assembled to understand the temporal complexity of Caribbean food systems, and how can we harness this historical perspective to inform policy and practice strategies for better nutrition and health? Objectives 1) To develop a network of international and interdisciplinary scholars across relevant disciplines who use historically-informed data from a variety of untapped datasets to understand contemporary food systems challenges in LMIC regions; 2) To co-develop methods and build capacity (initially in the Caribbean region) for mixed-method, transdisciplinary data assemblage to make better use of existing data and take data out of their disciplinary silos; 3) To co-design with stakeholders a strategy toolbox with worked examples of using historical data assemblages to map food systems to inform policy and practice in the Caribbean region and beyond.

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-AH_T00407X_1
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
31-12-2019
Total Budget:
£165,350


SCaRP: Simulating Cascading Rainfall-triggered landslide hazards in the Philippines

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

The Philippines lies on the eastern edge of the Maritime Continent and the tropical warm pool, which comprises the largest area of high precipitation on Earth. Furthermore, the Philippines is on the front line of tropical cyclones that form in the Pacific ocean to the west and deliver extreme precipitation on top of rainfall delivered by tropical weather systems. The combination of extreme rainfall and mountainous terrain mean that the Philippines are prone to catastrophic landsliding and related sedimentation problems in rivers that cause major human and economic losses. These hazards are likely to become more frequent under climate change, as the Tropics warms and the atmospheric water content increases, and existing tropical circulation systems intensify. However, the response of landslides to meteorological drivers and climate change is modulated by geomorphological and geological processes that are not completely understood. The overall aim of SCaRP is to determine and quantify the interaction of meteorological drivers and preconditioning factors that lead to landslides and related fluvial sedimentation in the Philippines, and to improve prediction of landslide hazards and downstream sedimentation over a range of timescales. The objectives are to: 1. Identify multi-landslide events and their meteorological drivers and preconditioning factors over the Philippines 2. Quantify rates of sediment delivery by landslides and transport of this sediment in rivers 3. Develop and test models of landslides and downstream sedimentation over the Philippines 4. Assess the impact of climate change on landsliding and sedimentation in the Philippines 5. Develop an early warning system for landslide hazards in the Philippines These objectives will achieved by testing four key scientific hypotheses: 1. Threshold rainfall for landslide triggering will vary through time and space as a function of both meteorological drivers and preconditioning factors such as antecedent soil moisture and sediment supply/soil thickness. 2. Landslide probability following a landslide will be lower for a period of years following failure until soil supply has been regenerated 3. Sediment delivery from landslide scars will remain elevated in the years following a typhoon until scars are revegetated 4. Landslide hazard and related sedimentation will increase under climate change but will be limited by soil regeneration rates

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-NE_S003371_2
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
01-11-2019
Total Budget:
£154,168


Imagining Futures through Un/Archived Pasts - Development Proposal

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Imagining Futures repurposes existing archives to use against the grain to benefit communities and explores the creation of egalitarian archives that promote access to information, transparency and social cohesion. The following objectives are interdependent: moving from grounded knowledge to its contribution to wider methodologies. The objectives concern activities to be conducted during the Development Phase which will also be used for scoping, piloting, data collection, capacity building, in preparation for the Network Plus grant. 1) To use the intrinsic potential of the archive for its capacity to build confidence, reveal co-existing narratives, enhance understanding, empathy, and thus reduce inter/intra-community conflict among diverse social, political, religious, economic, and regional groups, enhancing potential for sustainable peace (SDG 11/16). To pilot this with our team members in Tanzania and Lebanon. 2) Create an inclusive network of academics, archivists, historians, archaeologists, architects, artists, urban-planners, geographers, practitioners, authorities, NGOs, educators, and community stakeholders related to memory institutions and community development. 3) Create a network, committed to inclusive and meaningful dialogues with communities, to exist during and beyond the project, linking inter-disciplinary research and expertise that draw on distinct geo-political contexts where the need for new imaginaries is most urgent including Lebanon and Tanzania. In conjunction with this, critically review institutional policies to facilitate such dialogues, advocating a model approach for diversity and gender equality, ethics, safeguarding and risk-management protocols. 4) Activate archives as sites of discourse, with Maji Maji War sites in Tanzania as catalysts linking with Baddawi Camp in Lebanon, by providing access to the historically disenfranchised, to enhance and disseminate methodologies of reading archives against the grain, to subvert conventional epistemologies and challenge dominant or exclusionary narratives, by bringing out diverse voices and exposing archival formation as a result of multiple histories and intersecting lives. 5) Develop and facilitate the physical creation of diverse archives and approaches, as propositions for a methodology of their preservation, and related heritage (SDG 10/11.4), as a pathway to an egalitarian Archive for the Future. 6) Produce guidelines on site-sensitive practices, for activating existing archives and creating new ones, their engagement, storage, dissemination and accessibility. Advocating for culture's role in building just, peaceful, inclusive societies. 7) Build towards creating policy papers and ethical guidelines, for creation, use, and custodianship of archives, for application by international organizations such as OSCE, ICCROM, and UNESCO, to ensure archiving practices aren't further acts of intrusion, dis-empowerment and control. Using their platforms, to educate and re-frame thinking on value across supra-state organisations, NGOs and memory institutions. 8) Create agile solutions of different mediums and scales, technologies, to share archiving methods. The project's archiving & tools will serve as experiment & model. 9) Expose the impact of colonial, western, male gaze - historically pervasive, in the subject of the archived (e.g. monumental) and its form (visual/text-based) - in framing policies of preservation and reconstruction. 10) Increase mobility of people and ideas, through the Network, creating a bridge and partnerships between Middle East and Africa (SDG 17.14/17), emphasizing south to south connectivity, and across: 1) recovering communities in conflict zones and postcolonial contexts; 2) organisations, communities and enterprises within contexts of displacement; 3) researchers, across humanities and other fields, as architecture, design, urban-planning, those in memory institutions and practitioners; 4) supra/state bodies.

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-AH_T005556_1
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
01-07-2019
Total Budget:
£146,739


Building an Alternative Distribution Network for Moroccan Cinema: Online Audiences, Festival Networks and Transnational Talent Development

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

1. To locate, secure distribution rights, digitally restore and subtitle three key but largely overlooked films from the history of Moroccan cinema. This would involve working with rights holders and film archives in Morocco, as well as experts in digital restoration and transfer to produce a high-quality, future-proof digital cinema package (DCP) of the films. Copies of the DCPs can then be screened at festivals, viewed online and housed in film archives in Morocco and across the world for researchers and the general public to access. 2. To disseminate digitally these restored films to an international online audience, working with a series of online 'influencers' (filmmakers, critics, film agencies, film schools) to maximise the potential reach of the films to a diverse range of audiences (cinephiles, students, researchers, festival goers, the general public). 3. To curate and deliver a series of screenings of the restored Moroccan films at four festivals in the UK and two in Morocco. In the UK the films will be screened via TANO, the UK network of four African film festivals: Africa in Motion (Glasgow and Edinburgh), Film Africa (London), Afrika Eye (Bristol), and Watch-Africa (Cardiff), during the festival cycle in October and November 2019. In Morocco, the films will be screened at the Tetouan International Film School Film Festival (FIDEC) in November 2019 and the Moroccan National Film Festival, Tangier in March 2020. 4. Alongside the screenings of the films in Edinburgh, to host two European festival programmers and a representative from the Arab Cinema Centre at the Africa in Motion film festival in Scotland. Activities will include a one-day industry workshop and a discussion/Q&A event for the general public following the screening of the three restored Moroccan films. The purpose of this initiative is to promote the visibility of curation and programming of Moroccan cinema on the international film festival circuit. 5. Alongside the screenings at FIDEC in Tetouan, to host two workshops involving project partners at the London Film School and the documentary filmmaking programme at the Abdelmalek Essaadi University in Tetouan. The first workshop will assist emerging Moroccan filmmakers to develop their film projects as well as facilitating transnational talent development between tutors and students from film schools in Morocco and the UK. The second will involve a discussion of the three Moroccan films in order to deepen emerging Moroccan filmmakers' understanding of their own film history as a source of inspiration for their own film practice. 6. Alongside the screenings at the National Film festival in Tangiers, to broker a meeting between the Moroccan Film Council (CCM) and the British Film Institute to discuss ways to further and deepen further collaboration between Moroccan filmmakers, UK film festivals and the industry more widely. 7. In collaboration with Professor Catherine Grant (a leading video essay practitioner) to produce a video essay inspired by the three restored Moroccan films.

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-AH_T001038_1
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
01-11-2019
Total Budget:
£80,004


OVERCOME - digital innOVation in flood Early warning and wateR-related disease prevention for COMmunity capacity building and rEsilience

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

OVERCOME will build a transnational consortium with multidisciplinary expertise that is ready to advance the research for creating innovative technological methodologies and applications to identify and recommend the best strategies for natural hazard risk management. OVERCOME will engage stakeholders from academic, industry, governments, NGOs and local communities to co-shape the research questions and targeted outcomes for the follow-up research in order to deliver final products that can be adopted by these stakeholders. This will strengthen the capacity in vulnerable communities for minimising the negative impact of natural hazards and associated waterborne disease,which will fulfil Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We will form four working groups (WGs), each with a specialised subteam, to address specific challenges in flood, drought, and related disease risk management. Each WG will be co-led by a UK and an African partner, supported by other consortium members and external partners to scope the research aims and design methodologies. The main goals of the WGs are: WG 1 Natural hazard analysis Facilitate dialogue among cross-sectoral experts to identify research gaps in cholera epidemic, weather and climatic hazards to propose a hybrid modelling approach for enhancing the understanding of flooding and drought mechanisms in partner countries, and building the capacity of local stakeholders to analyse and reduce relevant risks (SDGs 9 and 13). WG2 Risk assessment Engage with local communities, government departments and experts to identify potential problems and prioritise solutions related to damage and epidemics in the community suffering from natural hazards. The collaboration will gather evidence related to critical mechanisms for disasters and disease spreading, and evaluate the effectiveness of humanitarian response options for co-developing research plans for smart communities (SDGs 11 and 17). WG3 Interventions Collaborate with local authorities and communities to: (i) identify potential intervention options for developing long-term adaptation and short-term crisis management strategies including technological equipment and novel modelling techniques for monitoring and predicting natural hazards to issue on-time early warning in short/long-term, (ii) analyse potential solutions for various natural hazards, and (iii) prioritise options to enhance resilience-based performance of the community e.g. WASH provision, flood protection infrastructure (nature-based solutions and/or ecosystem services as well as physical measures), preparedness for droughts, health care facilities and socio-economic systems for risk management co-benefits (SDGs 3, 6, 8 and 9). WG4 Holistic framework Integrate the state-of-the-art methodologies identified in WGs 1-3 to establish transformative approaches in order to advance scientific research in natural disaster risk reduction (DRR) in African countries. This will ultimately lead to the co-creation of an intelligent decision support system at stage two (full proposal) that provides a digital platform for technological developments for both short-term emergency prediction and management of hazards in urban/rural communities and mitigation/adaptation recommendations, and long-term policy making and strategic planning (SDGs 9 and 15).

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-EP_T030089_1
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
01-05-2020
Total Budget:
£67,447


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