Go to main content
UK aid from the British people
  1. Home
  2. Search Results

Search Results for: "UK Space Agency"

Sort results by: Title
Default filter shows currently active projects. To see projects at other stages, use the status filters.
Now showing projects 14 of 14

Core funding to support Frontline AIDS' strategy

Frontline AIDS

Strategic Response 1: Increase access to quality HIV and health programmes Strategic Response 2: Support community-based organisations to be connected and effective elements of health systems Strategic Response 3: Advocate for HIV, health, gender, and human rights Strategic Response 4: A stronger partnership that is evidence-based and accountable to communities

Project Identifier: GB-CHC-1038860-28437
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 23-03-2016
Budget: £16,190,000

Healthy housing for the Displaced

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Research Objectives: The project will lead to a transformative new science of shelter design based on multi-criteria optimisation that puts the social well being, health and thermal comfort of the shelter occupants at the center of the design process and allows an agile response. It uses the current shelter occupants as part of the research team, rather than just a cohort to study. Our research objectives (RO) are: RO1: Complete the largest ever uniform linked thermal, air quality, and social environment study in camps around the world. Collect the views of camp occupants and aid agencies on possible shelter improvements and limitations. (These will form the seed points in the multi-objective process.) RO2: Create an optimisation process that will seek to improve living conditions, reducing mortality and morbidity in displacement camps through the creation of low-cost, easy to construct housing that moderates extremes of temperature while providing the space required for dignified living and customary domestic and intra-community relations. RO3: Prototype, measure, and develop shelter solutions using novel combinations of conventional and non-conventional materials appropriate for a range of climatic, social, political, and economic conditions. RO4: Create a methodology for the progressive creation of new designs as technologies change, new disasters occur and further data is collected by all actors in the sector, including supporting software. RO5: Develop a two-way process of design exchange suitable for working with displaced people who may have suffered personal and societal breakdown. Output Objectives: 1. First in class survey of this depth completed covering temperatures, social attitude, air quality and lighting in refugee camps. 2. International Repository of Shelter Data created for all those in the field to deposit their raw and processed data, time series etc., both new and historic. 3. Comfort theory expanded into a new, and until now understudied, population. 4. Validated thermal, air quality, and lighting models of common shelter types. Science of shelter design initiated. 5. Twenty possible shelter designs created, all developed to construction detail. All developed with input from aid agencies and refugees 6. Six designs constructed in UK to test construction times; then in climate chamber to validate modelling; then on site in Jordan. 7. Validated, easy to use shelter design tool, tested in use, distributed worldwide. 8. Finalisation of a new transformative approach to transitional shelter design based on robust thermal and social measurement, computer modelling, input from camp occupants, test data from our climate chamber, and test construction trials all of which will be subsequently monitored and measured by testing in real camps.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-EP_P029175_1
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: N/A
Budget: £1,586,595

A Collaborative Multi-agency Platform for Building Resilient Communities

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

The proposed project will address three global challenges suggested by the United Nations Economics and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) in their report on "Disasters in Asia and the Pacific: 2015 Year in Review", namely: 1) Building political leadership critical for the success of disaster risk reduction and management; 2) Building Urban Resilience; 3) Capitalise on innovative space technology applications and emerging technology. The key measurable objectives (with equal priority) that will be executed in addressing these challenges are: 1. Develop a Resilience Framework that defines the factors that constitute vulnerabilities, resilience capacities and the relationship between them. This can be used by agencies to develop dynamic resilience measures of physical infrastructure, health, economic, organisational and social capacities. 2. Investigate how teamwork among the disaster management agencies in low-/middle-income countries could be enhanced through digitally-supported collaboration processes. This work will investigate enhancement of current organisational structures and collaboration processes in order to exploit the benefit of the interactive collaborative technologies that will be developed within the project. 3. Develop a web-based collaboration platform that can support collective vulnerability assessment and mitigation, involving multi-agencies. It will comprise a dynamic information model that can capture and visualize social, environmental, economic and infrastructure vulnerability over time and space for various disaster types. This will allow agencies to identify hot spots and take preventative measures to reduce disaster impact. 4. Develop a decision support system (DSS), based on spatial system dynamics, that can be used by multi-agencies to assess the vulnerabilities, risks and consequences of hazards on critical infrastructure. This will allow agencies to propose and evaluate protection, mitigation, response and recovery strategies and options in building resilience. This DSS will also be capable of providing real-time support for decision makers during crises and emergencies. 5. Extend the above web-based collaboration platform (Objective 3) for use during disaster response phases by integrating real-time data (weather, 2D satellite data, crowd-sourcing). This added functionality will allow agencies to overlay emerging hazards over the vulnerability information and take informed decisions to mitigate the disaster impact (i.e. moving vulnerable people in advance). 6. Implement a novel 3D collaborative environment that allows remote teams to get an accurate picture of a disaster event through 3D satellite data and analytics. It will connect remote disaster response teams and will allow them to collaboratively access near real-time 3D satellite information to plan their disaster response activities. It will allow them to study structural movements, flood damage, environment damages etc. and have a clear understanding of the dynamically changing disaster-hit region.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-EP_P028543_1
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: N/A
Budget: £1,241,231

Creating Safer Space: Strengthening Civilian Protection Amidst Violent Conflict

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

The Network Plus "Creating Safer Space" supports the enhancement and expansion of effective local unarmed civilian protection (UCP) practices for and with civilians in conflict regions. To work toward this vision it pursues 8 objectives: 1) Strengthen exchange and collaboration of the UCP community of practice/research An active global community of practice/research engaged in exchange and learning is key to creating an evidence base of effective UCP. The Network connects UCP actors across countries and regions through networking events and scoping visits, and incentivises South-South collaborative research to enable in-depth and cross-case insight. [Strands 1, 2] 2) Develop the research capacity of UCP academics and practitioners Local civilian protection is best understood, enhanced and expanded through collaborative research and engagement activities that involve conflict-affected communities. This Network sets workshops around participatory, creative and digital methods to expand knowledge of inclusive research strategies and incentivise participatory research that is context-sensitive, needs-based and potentially transformative - with the aim to build/strengthen local civilian protection. [Strand 1] 3) Develop a tailored evaluation and monitoring mechanism for UCP Evaluation and monitoring (E&M) are essential to UCP work but challenging in practice due to its context-specificity and bottom-up approach. The Network collaborates with the Everyday Peace Indicators project to develop a tailored, context-sensitive, community-focused E&M method able to capture the primacy of the local and the dynamic interplay of factors affecting protection outcomes. [Strand 1] 4) Enhance understanding of civilians' vulnerabilities in violent conflict Foundational research into the complexities, intersectionality and dynamics of vulnerability, agency and resilience of civilians in violent conflicts is essential to a contextualised understanding of the need for and impact of UCP. The Network encourages in-depth research that enhances and nuances understandings of vulnerability in order to improve protection. [Strand 2, Theme A] 5) Provide a solid evidence base of successful local UCP/self-protection Understanding how local unarmed protection by outside actors and community self-protection work and interact is central to building local protection infrastructures that have the potential to become self-sustaining and provide safer space for development. The Network incentivises in-depth single-case studies and research that engages in cross-country or cross-regional collaboration, to establish a solid evidence base of success factors in the interplay of outside protection and community self-protection strategies with the aim to establish/enhance long-term local protection infrastructures. [Strand 2, Theme B] 6) Explore potentials to expand effective UCP in scope, size and actor range UCP has so far been successfully implemented on a relatively small scale. The Network supports research, through South-South collaborations and Sowing Seeds grants, that explores how existing approaches can be scaled up in size, transferred to new contexts, and/or adopted by new organisations or communities working to protect civilians in conflict. [Strand 2, Theme C] 7) Develop a UCP typology Synthesising research findings from four paradigmatic cases of UCP (Colombia, Myanmar, Philippines, South Sudan), the Network will develop the first typology of conditions of possibility of effective unarmed self-/protection. [Strand 2] 8) Share knowledge to protect more people The Network's dissemination and impact activities work toward enhancing existing protection work, expanding successful UCP approaches in size and scope, and consolidating the political, institutional and financial support for local protection, with a view to protect more conflict-affected persons from harm, decrease forced displacement and facilitate development. [Strand 3]

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-AH_T008024_1
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: N/A
Budget: £702,092

Mental health literacy in urban and rural communities in Kerala India: An interdisciplinary approach using applied theatre methodology

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

This proposal details a novel and highly collaborative approach to our understanding of how urban and rural communities in Kerala, India construct mental health literacy (MHL) for mental health well being. Our emphasis is on formulating knowledge in new, creative and accessible ways, through use of applied theatre and media engagement as an intervention to enable knowledge to be used in genuinely empowering and emancipatory ways by citizens of Kerala (India), researchers and health service agencies. Our specific focus is in the state of Kerala in India which is witnessing an alarming rise in mental health disorders within a fast-changing socio-economic societal context with a higher prevalence of mental ill-health and alcohol abuse than the rest of India. Our focus will be on developing culturally appropriate, acceptable and accessible mental health literacy, and we will develop this through engagement with users and stakeholders. This will be achieved through our exploration of lived experiences of Mental Neurological and Substance Use (MNS) disorders and their effect on families and communities; their narratives on understanding these through social, economic and cultural factors; and how intersecting inequalities affect the ability to access treatment, help and support. MHL is defined as knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders which aid their recognition, management or prevention. Our overall research question is: How effectively can we promote culturally appropriate MHL in urban and rural communities using applied theatre methodology? This focus will be addressed through specific research questions: (Q1) How is MHL shaped by economic, social and cultural contexts in Kerala? (Q2) How do urban and rural communities construct appropriate meaning for MHL? (Q3) How can we best engage with urban and rural communities in Kerala to discuss mental ill-health? (Q4) How might we use a participatory applied theatre model as an intervention for developing MHL? (Q5) How can we best engage with communities, professionals, services, policy-makers and Governmental agencies in promoting MHL? These questions will be addressed through the following objectives: (O1) Conduct a rapid participatory literature and practice review for developing community engagement for MHL (O2) Collaborate with theatre practitioners in the UK and India to advance and develop new and hybrid models of participatory theatre practice that develop the 'voice' and agency of urban and rural communities to examine MHL for positive coping and wellbeing (O3) Develop narrative data sets on lived experiences of MNS disorders (O4) Co-production of pilot pieces of community theatre practice reflecting the lived experiences of urban and rural communities to test their applicability in promoting MHL (O5) Engagement and participation of the general public and stakeholders using social media, linking with film, television and other media (O6) Co-produce policy and practice guidance for policy makers and professionals for promoting MHL, mental health and well-being. Our approach is based on a transformative emancipatory paradigm. Our collaboration will facilitate the development of lasting research partnerships combining knowledge of public mental health challenges with awareness of evidence based interventions and their cultural transferability providing more insight into the socio-economic and cultural contexts of MNS disorders and people's understanding of them.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-ES_S00145X_1
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: N/A
Budget: £578,150

Colombia River Stories:improving socio-environmental understandings for building sustainable peace

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Colombia has experienced one of the most protracted civil conflicts in the world. Despite the 2016 peace agreement between the Government and the FARC-EP, conflict in Choco', Colombia's poorest region, has worsened (UMAIC, 2017). To understand why conflict persists in Choco', and the possibilities for sustainable peace, it is necessary to consider the central role that Choco''s rivers play. Rivers not only offer substantive benefits to Choco''s communities (e.g. transport, food), they are also woven into their cultural identifies and livelihoods. It is generally acknowledged that the illegal exploitation of rivers by armed actors through alluvial gold mining, and the impact this has on communities' cultural identify and sustainable livelihoods, is a primary factor that fuels the wider conflict ecosystem. However, it is a factor that has received little attention and that remains poorly understood. This project will address this knowledge gap. It will deliver fresh understandings of the interrelations between illicit mining activity, the natural environment and conflict and violence in Choco' by answering two research questions: RQ1: Who / what are the actors and drivers of conflict in Choco' and how have they developed with respect to alluvial gold mining? RQ2: To what extent can integrated 'river stories', including perspectives of communities and the river itself, inform more inclusive strategies for building sustainable peace? Our approach is founded upon peace and reconciliation processes around the world that foreground the telling and curation of testimony and stories as central to revealing how complex conflict ecosystems function and where interventions can maximise opportunities for peace. Stories enable different conflict actors to explain their actions to one-another and support a collective transition from narrow understandings of conflict, and the interrelationships that sustain it, to more expansive and inclusive ones through which roadmaps to sustainable peace can ultimately be plotted. They allow the voices of marginalised and silenced groups to be heard. This is crucial for building an inclusive peace. However, the agency of Choco''s rivers in relation to the conflict means that the river's stories must also be voiced and articulated alongside those of human actors. This necessitates a novel, transdisciplinary coalition of researchers and methods from the social and natural sciences that combine Latin American traditions of community co-production and popular education with scientific methods for environmental reconstruction and monitoring. To this end, the project's work packages are constructed around three core objectives: Obj 1 (WP1): To deliver an integrated 'river story' from multiple perspectives, across both time and space, that will be used to inform communities' priorities and strategies for sustainable peace. Obj 2 (WP2): To capture and analyse the interrelationships and feedbacks between river system form and function, alluvial gold mining, and conflict in Choco'. Obj 3 (WP3): To co-design and produce curated river stories that can be told to local, national and international audiences to inform more inclusive and sustainable strategies for peace.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-ES_S001883_1
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: N/A
Budget: £320,843

Caribbean Cyclone Cartography: Mapping histories, narratives and futures of hurricane 'resilience' in a changing climate.

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

The Caribbean Cyclone Cartography (CCC) Project will collaboratively research and map survivor-led hurricane recoveries past and present, with the goals of: (a) developing informed ecological citizenship, and (b) building an inclusive, publicly accessible knowledge base to guide future cyclone preparedness, responses and reconstruction in Dominica and the greater Caribbean. CCC will develop citizen and academic research capacities, cultivate equitable partnerships and build interdisciplinary knowledge exchange platforms to enhance Caribbean strategic responses to the 'existential threat' of climate change-intensified cyclones. Herein, we address three key global agendas: 1. The UN Sustainable Development Goals: 4. Inclusive Education/Lifelong Learning; 13. Climate Action. 2. Sendai Priorities: 2. Understanding disaster risk; 4. Enhancing disaster preparedness & "Building Back Better". 3. 'The Humanitarian Grand Bargain': 6.Participation revolution: include those receiving aid in decision making. By enabling public access to cyclone research (for citizens/researchers/learners) and developing an integrated framework for equitable dialogue, CCC aims to enhance Caribbean resilience to hurricanes and related environmental hazards. The core output for the project will be a digital, multi-disciplinary map of Dominica, populated by historic, contemporary ethnographic and geoinformatic data to offer a holistic analysis of Caribbean social and place-based cyclone 'resilience' (a much contested concept across development studies). This inclusive and publicly accessible model (2/3 Dominicans are internet users) provides a resource to help citizens and disaster officials better prepare for, navigate and recover from future storms; whilst offering an open-source prototype that fellow SIDS can adapt to their own climatic predicaments - thus promoting regional and global wellbeing, safety and sustainable livelihoods (economic development). Shortly after category-5 Hurricane Maria devastated Dominica (Eastern Caribbean) on 18th September 2017, the government boldly vowed to go beyond simply 'building back better', to become the 'first climate resilient nation on earth', drawing US$400M support from international agencies. The inter-ministerial Climate Resilience Execution Agency of Dominica (CREAD) established to meet this challenge. Aims: Grounded in the global agendas, principles and CREAD vision outlined above, The CCC Project will map Dominican hurricane resilience 'from below' - through the social histories, lived realities and place-based knowledge of the island's inhabitants. Our aim is to investigate and visually map the potential of 'vernacular' or community resiliencies, as: (1) a basis for locating, understanding and mitigating hurricane-related risks; (2) a set of capabilities that can be enhanced to inform inclusive disaster management/humanitarian responses and policies; (3) a resource to help guide sustainable post-disaster reconstruction; and (4) a foundation upon which to build public environmental knowledge (scientific and 'traditional'), towards informed ecological citizenship and improved preparedness. Guided by a, international consortium of academic and civil society partners, the Project will: a) Develop innovative and inclusive survivor-led research methodologies and interventions that invite marginalised communities into climate change adaptation dialogue. b) Cultivate a cadre of project partners & stakeholders who will collectively champion cyclone hazard awareness. c) Build the adaptive capacity of Caribbean civil society, disaster management and humanitarianism partners. d) Promote public 'resilience consciousness' and informed and responsible ecological citizenship (regionally and globally). e) Engage a creative, critical and complementary dialogue with the policies and practices of the inter-ministerial Climate Resilience Execution Agency for Dominica (CREAD)

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-ES_T00312X_1
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: N/A
Budget: £301,541

GCRF Development Award Creating Safer Space - Building Networks and Knowledge Bases for Civilian Protection

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

The Development Award project "Creating Safer Space" aims to build and consolidate equitable partnerships of knowledge generation and dissemination between and among researchers and practitioners specialising in Unarmed Civilian Protection (UCP) work in two world regions-Latin America and Southeast Asia. This is with a view to contribute to the enhancement and expansion of local unarmed civilian protection practices for/with civilians in conflict regions. To work towards this aim, it pursues five main objectives: 1. Building and/or consolidating UCP partner networks: The project activities will expand and deepen the networks between UK researchers and academic and non-academic partners in Colombia, Mexico, Myanmar and the Philippines, as well as among these partners, in order to build the trust and mechanisms necessary for equitable research and impact work relationships and to ensure that research is needs-based with regard to both UCP practitioners and beneficiary communities. (Activity strand A) 2. Scoping the state-of-the-art of knowledge on UCP: Building on existing efforts, the project will undertake comprehensive reviews of existing knowledge on UCP in the four LMIC countries as well as on a global scale-taking into account academic and grey literatures as well as other sources of information/knowledge (including photography, film, art and craft objects) and ways of knowing (e.g. indigenous knowledges and cosmologies)-to gauge knowledge synergies and gaps and as a basis for future research and practitioner analyses. (Activity strand B) 3. Enhancing capacities and procedures for responsible UCP: The project will undertake activities aimed at developing procedures and training materials for safe, ethical and inclusive research among vulnerable populations and in situations where UCP takes place (among violence-affected communities, in situations of forced displacement). Where need is identified, these activities will involve the development of procedures of due diligence and research capacity building in the four LMICs. (Activity strand C) 4. Creating communication channels for South-South learning: Based on existing efforts, the project will lay the groundwork for a digital platform that enables collaboration and exchange between and among UCP researchers and practitioners across different technological, linguistic and cultural contexts in the UK and LMIC partner countries.(Activity strand D) 5. Facilitating future UCP advocacy and impact: In order to facilitate future pathways to impact for researchers and practitioners in the field of UCP in each of the partner countries, the project will undertake a context-sensitive stakeholder mapping as basis for future stakeholder engagement. (Activity strand E)

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-AH_T005394_1
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: N/A
Budget: £141,217

Gender-Just Digital Innovation in Africa (GeDIA): Uniting women changemakers (and their male allies) to co-design gender-just digital futures

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Our aim is to unite women changemakers (and their male allies) from across academia, practice and industry (25 overall, of which 10 Co-Is, 7 partners, 8 to be co-opted) to develop strategies for gender-just digital futures in Africa. Together we will move gender equality from an afterthought in digital development to the heart of decision-making in inclusion, research, training, and design. We seek to unite the best gender and digital innovation research and together with women changemakers in African countries develop an action research agenda (to be executed in stage 2) to ensure that people of all genders have a fair share in Africa's digital future. We will work in 3 focal areas, with related research questions: A. Supporting advocacy for gender equality with digital tools and Data Science A1) How can advocacy for gender equality in Africa be improved with sophisticated use of digital tools (data science tools, data visualisation, SMS, social media etc)? A2) How can better digitalisation, datafication and data science lead to better gender-specific and intersectional data in Africa? B. Ensuring fair access for girls and women to training in IT and Data Science B1) How can structural barriers be overcome? B2) How can digital literacy training and curricula be changed to support women and girls' decisions on privacy and data sovereignty while helping them minimise their online risk (harassment; trolling etc)? B3) How can African women as creators of technologies (e.g. in IT professions) be supported? C. Developing methodologies for gender-just service design for digital-related services C1) How can digital design processes be developed that put African women's priorities and agency at the centre? C2) How can women and men together change the structural barriers that prevent gender equal outcomes in service design? We will: 1. Convene a series of workshops and webinars to jointly develop an analytical framework and action research agenda. We will apply scholarship in ICT4D and gender; Data Science; HCI; service design; and gender studies. 2. Form a Network of Networks bridging the business community (via GSMA), women changemakers in development (Oxfam; Malala Fund), women in the IT sector (Asikana) and networks of academics (our centres,UCT alumnae in ICT4D; ICT4D North) 3. Co-produce a Large Grant GCRF DIDA application (stage 2) to carry out the action research. 4. Develop a methodology for gender-just participatory service-design (to be piloted and scaled in stage 2) 5. Engage in mutual capacity building among the participants, drawing on the diverse expertise and existing training tools (e.g. Oxfam's social media training). Build a mentoring network, GeDIA Academy, for early career female academics in our area at African Universities. 6. Partner with the Data Science Africa Training School to run a first-ever training school focused on female participants' needs and priorities (20 participants). 7. Through a website, membership directory, videos, blog and e-book, amplify the voice of African women changemakers. Throughout and beyond the project period, the network will be a go-to address for journalists or prospective research collaborators to find relevant female public commentators and collaborators. Key non-academic partners and advisors: - DFID have stressed that our bid is highly aligned with their Digital Strategy, are enthusiastic, and have agreed to serve on the Advisory Board - Industry: The Connected Women Programme of the GSMA (global trade association of mobile phone providers) are very supportive, will serve on Advisory Board and will make introductions to industry partners - NGOs and enterprise: Oxfam GB (Gender team, Research team, Digital team); Malala Fund; INIITKenya have co-developed the proposal and will contribute in-kind (40 days of staff time). Zambian NGO Asikana Networkfor Women in IT will co-lead (time funded)

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-EP_T029110_1
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: N/A
Budget: £102,868

Implementation Action Team: Cultural Heritage Promoting Quality of Life and Sustainable Development in the At-Risk Megacity Periphery of Kolkata

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

There are seven objectives of equal priority and two 'partnerships for the goals' with the Denmark-India Serampore Initiative and the West Bengal Heritage Commission: 1. The project aims that 10 young professionals gain official tourist guiding accreditation in a public private partnership through our Hugli Heritage Enterprise Incubator (HHEI); 2. That three large schools, of up to 1000 students each, participate with their teachers in project-based, employment-focused schools heritage activity (EF-SHA) that allows students, teachers and parents to use the Implementation Action Team's (IAT's) equipment and know-how to raise funds for preservation of the history and heritage of their school or a significant building in their locality. 3. That there are 432 places in a total of 36 seminars on both individuals' sensitization and community awareness of heritage as part of a Heritage and Mental Well-Being Programme (H-MWB-P). 4. That the IAT's conservation architect and Sir James Stirling Chair of Architecture in the University of Liverpool, works with Konnagar Municipality to create a sensory garden and museum displays which recognize the key role the Tagore family riverside garden house played in the development of Indian modernist painting. This is action for community resource development in Konnagar (CRD-K), a city on the urban periphery of Kolkata (population 76,172 in 2011), where public leisure space is in extremely short supply. 5. That the first Masons' and Allied Trades' Centre of Excellence in the Hugli Corridor (MAT-CE) be established in Chandannagar. Here master masons from Murshidabad, outside the immediate region, and currently working with our partner the Serampore Initiative, train allied tradesmen and women in building restoration techniques in order to form local teams that can demonstrate their skills with sample demonstration micro restoration projects at five large heritage dwellings identified according to need. 6, the work of the MAT-CE and the two best-in-region heritage precinct restorations in Barrackpore Park and Serampore (as well as an impact audit thereof) will then all be the subjects of two 30 and one 10-minute films. These are to be produced by the Heritage Education Film Unit (HEF-U), a direct spin off of the film work of the predecessor Hugli River of Cultures Project (HRCP). 7. a UK expert environmental assessor will use drone captured images to create a single map of the stretch of the Hugli corridor from Chandannagar to Konnagar that will allow different groups of town and transport infrastructure planners to better connect heritage assets with transport nodes at different points in the day, allowing main and subsidiary heritage precincts to be identified. The Implementation Action Team's partnership for the goals with the Denmark-India Serampore Initiative is zero cost and in-kind; it will allow the IAT to have the benefits of the Initiative's contacts, work plans and, above all, practical expertise of heritage renovation in West Bengal. The Serampore Initiative started started in 2008, but is reaching the end of its life cycle. This partnership with the Serampore Initiative will be supported in terms of personnel by the Hugli Chapter of the Indian National Trust for Arts and Cultural Heritage, that is to be formed in January 2020 as one of the outputs and lasting legacies of the predecessor Hugli River of Cultures Project (HRCP). The partnership and the additional support will further the ultimate aim of allowing the IAT to continue some or all of its seven pathway activities beyond January 2021, after the end of the twelve-month funding period. This ultimate aim of continuity will be facilitated and funded by the West Bengal Heritage Commission, an official state body that has offered us an accreditation partnership. Full details of these project partnerships can be found in the form of Letters of Support in the Attachments section.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-AH_T007958_1
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: N/A
Budget: £80,363

Transitional justice as education: A feminist network for empowering truth commissions

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

There have been over forty truth commissions since the early 1980s; only two have been led by women. Truth commissions (TCs) in El Salvador, Uganda and Uruguay did not include any women as commissioners. In every truth commission apart from the Greensboro Commission in the USA, women commissioners have been outnumbered by men, sometimes dramatically so as in Peru (10:2) and Morocco (15:1). Women truth commissioners, human rights advocates and feminists have worked hard to include and embed gender, attention to women's rights, and women's experiences during conflict into the work that truth commissions do, drawing on wider initiatives around women rights and feminism in peace movements and peacebuilding. Likewise, educators and scholars have argued for a richer attention to education and pedagogical practice within the work of TCs, pointing to the potential such engagements have both enhancing participation during the TC mandate and for the long term impact of TCs. Research and activism in both areas point to the importance of emotional and affective responses and relationships in the success of transitional justice work around gender and pedagogy. TC processes, which involve repeatedly hearing difficult testimonies and uncovering truths about violence and human rights abuses, can be highly stressful, exhausting and even traumatic for those who lead and participate in them, and who are inevitably deeply personally and emotionally involved.Our network therefore adopts a feminist theoretical and methodological focus, enabling a space for theorising affect and affective agency in the pedagogical and gender work of the TC and a space for supporting, acknowledging and inspiring the affective agency that the individuals driving this work bring to it. This network seeks celebrate, share, reinforce and theorise the efforts of the Colombian TC to embed gender and pedagogy as priorities. The network brings together women truth commissioners (current and former) from around the world, feminist activists, transitional justice experts, and scholars towards the following objectives: 1) To support the Colombian TC to embed gender justice and innovative pedagogical engagement within the work of the commission and in its wider social impact. 2) To enable a space for those leading and working on gender and pedagogy within the Colombian TC to strategize and reflect on their work in dialogue with and learning from inspirational, feminist former truth commissioners, leaders, and experts from around the world (concentrated in the global South). 3) To create an interactive website that shares stories and insights, gathered through peer interviewing, from the inspirational individuals who make up the network for an audience of present and future feminists and peace activists. 4) To work together to theorise and publish academic papers on a feminist, affective transitional justice and its pedagogical potential. These objectives will be realised through a network organised around a series of workshops and travel visits with leading current and former truth commissioners (the vast majority women from the global south), experts on transitional justice, pedagogy and gender, and members of the Colombian's TCs gender and pedagogy working groups. Network members will share experiences, strategize with the Colombian TC team, and conduct a series of peer interviews, generating content for the interactive website. The project will produce co-authored papers sharing the Colombian TC experience and theorising affective agency and transitional justice.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-AH_S003975_1
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: N/A
Budget: £53,929

Gendering the smart city: A subaltern curation network on Gender Based Violence (GBV) in India

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

This two-year research network will develop and build upon strong foundations established through partnerships between UK and Indian academics and societal partners, with a broad aim of gendering the smart city agenda. To do so, it will use interdisciplinary approaches from urban studies, feminist geography and digital humanities to critique smart city claims of creating safe and sustainable cities through crowdsourced safety apps for women. It tests the hypothesis that the corporate driven smart city based on Big Data and Internet of Things (IoT) produces cities as 'containers' for smart technologies and GBV survivors as passive data-sensors with a disembodied yet 'real' experience of intimate violence in the city. The network thus aims to establish an alternative curation framework on Gender Based Violence (GBV) through a combination of gendered big data as well as the voices, experiences and creative digital practices of GBV survivors in informal settlements. The network will fulfill the following objectives: 1) To establish a network of academics, ICT enterprises, feminist NGOs and creative industries from UK and India working conceptually to engage in dialogue between current strands of research and development-oriented work on the safe smart city. While Delhi and Bengaluru's smart city agendas seek to establish them as safe cities by promoting crowdsoured safety apps for women, this network will seek to identify the 'blindspots' of gendered big data on GBV to develop alternative curation frameworks with GBV survivors. 2) To promote and develop a network of support, co-operation and knowledge exchange in two city focused stakeholder workshops in Delhi and Bengaluru. We will examine the smart city visions, policies, projects and technologies of Delhi and Bengaluru to understand how they aim to address gender justice across public and private spaces and deliver on NUA and SDG goals on Gender Equality and New Technologies. We will invite a range of stakeholders from academics, third sector, creative industries, law enforcement agencies, state departments, media/digital enterprises and grassroots organizations working on this theme. The aim will be to initiate pathways to shift current smart city agendas in Delhi and Bengaluru to make them more responsive to the experiences of GBV survivors. 3) To co-create two digital installations with GBV survivors from informal settlements in Delhi and Bengaluru to give them voice, agency and creative space within the smart city. The installations will use digital humanities methods to explore the 'data body' - a virtual entity that is unencumbered by the real and imagined boundaries which structure and control women's everyday experiences with GBV. The installations will initiate transformational change amongst GBV survivors and establish them as rights claiming citizens across material and digital spaces. 4) To strengthen international links between academic and non-academic partners in fostering critical dialogues on the smart city agenda on women's safety. This will be established through a London symposium in Somerset house, hosted by King's College London and the King's College London Cultural Institute (KCLCI). 5) To develop a multidisciplinary and international scope to the theme in the establishment of a project website and social media engagement through the duration of the project. The website will be regularly maintained by the team and will disseminate findings and engage with wider publics via regular blogs and announcements. 6) Catalyse the development of a long-term research programme on the gendered smart city. We will develop the network interaction between Indian and UK academics through published outputs and a joint RCUK grant application within 18 months of the project end.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-AH_R003866_2
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: N/A
Budget: £27,008

EcoProMIS 2.0

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

"The project will create a data analytics system “EcoProMIS” to transform data into affordable, accurate and actionable knowledge and decision support for land management in Colombia. The focus is on how to preserve biodiversity and reduce greenhouse gasses in crops and ecosystems including rice, palm oil, tropical savannah, forest and wetland systems. Currently rice and oil palm compete for land and resources (e.g. water) with tropical savannah, forest and wetland systems; individual decisions taken by farmers at the local scale mean that optimum allocation of land and resources is typically not achieved, increasing negative environmental impacts and making farming less sustainable in the long term. Providing local decision makers with clear, comprehensive regional data will enable them to make informed land use choices and will help to ensure that the incomes of smallholders and farmers, which are dependent on rice and/or oil palm, are sustainable. The international collaboration facilitated by this project allows Colombia to draw on UK expertise, whilst in turn helping the UK partners develop new marketable services for the longer term. The project will deliver benefits for the sustainable development of land management in Colombia, for the first time drawing on UK expertise in the interpretation of satellite data. The benefits for the international project participants are: • Cenipalma represents palm oil growers and Fedearroz represents rice growers in Colombia and both therefore have a direct interest in facilitating more sustainable production systems. • CIAT, Colombia, works across 53 countries in the tropics and will use the ouputs from the project to assist its work in Colombia and other countries which grow rice and palm oil where there are similar challenges in relation to both crop productivity and the links between farming and environmental stewardship. • The project will provide CIAT, Fedearroz, Cenipalma and Solidaridad with additional sources of free data to support their work with stakeholders in Colombia and therefore build their capacity to run research, extension and support programmes with land managers, farmers and smallholders. The benefits for Colombia are: • The integration of farming and natural habitat management so that a profitable farming industry can co-exist with climate change programmes and policies to protect the natural environment, ensuring that biodiversity is preserved and greenhouse gas emissions are managed in the long term (SDG13)."

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-GCRF-GCRF-INTPART-UKSA-GCRF-INTPART-CALL-2-UKSA_C2_07ab
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: N/A
Budget: Not Provided

Verumar

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

The project will develop a sustainable solution that will support BFAR with the identification of IUU fishing and management of fisheries to end overfishingin Philippine watersand make the national fishing grounds more sustainable and productive in the long term.The country has a population of some 104 million people. 93% of fish caught in the country are consumed domestically, with Filipinos eating on average 39kgs of seafood per person per year, equal to about 56% of their total animal protein intake. But it is not enough, and increasing the supply of affordable edible fish is important for improved nutrition and food security.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-GCRF-GCRF-INTPART-UKSA-GCRF-INTPART-CALL-2-UKSA_C2_11
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 02-01-2020
Budget: Not Provided

Results Filter

Status

Activity Status

Locations

+

Countries

+

Regions

Sectors

Sectors
+

Organisations

Implementing Organisations

Implementing Organisations

Start and end date

This site uses cookies

We use Google Analytics to measure how you use the website so we can improve it based on user needs. Google Analytics sets cookies that store anonymised information about how you got to the site, the internal pages you visit, how long you spend on each page and what you click on while you're visiting the site. Read more