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Adapting DIALOG+ and building capacity in schools to support mental wellbeing and resilience in post-conflict Colombia during the COVID-19 pandemic

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

It is estimated that here are around 8.5 million victims of armed conflict in Colombia. Tolima is one of the areas most affected as it was were guerrilla groups formed and it served as a key strategic corridor during the armed conflict. The national Mental Health Study (ENSM-2015) found high levels of mental distress and illness in Colombia's children and adolescents, including high levels of post-traumatic stress symptoms, in the context of poor levels of access to treatment. Tolima specifically is facing many challenges in the transition from conflict to peace, and one of the governmental programmes in place is the Development Programs with Territorial Approach (PDET) which aims to stimulate development, in part by prioritising healthcare access. Throughout the armed conflict and also as the region moves into peacebuilding, there has been a lack of access to mental health professionals, made harder by the fact that there are as few as 1.84 psychiatrists per 100,000 population in Colombia. This means that the role of teachers and school counsellors is key in providing mental health support for children and adolescents in this region. Mental health and well-being through adolescence is important for an optimal transition to adulthood and hence to sustain mental health later in life. In recent years there has been increased attention to the psychological consequences of conflict on adolescents. However, the impact of the armed conflict on children and adolescents is still poorly understood and there is a current need for a well-structured intervention to improve and deliver mental health interventions to this vulnerable group. Pontificia Universidad Javeriana has developed an online diploma to support mental health in the school community, which has proven to be effective in improving school interventions in mental health and improving the skills and knowledge of teachers. Likewise, the Queen Mary University of London team has developed and tested a mental health intervention called DIALOG+, a low-cost/cost saving evidence-based therapeutically effective mental health intervention, which has been used and assessed in many clinical contexts internationally. DIALOG+ was developed based on quality of life research, concepts of patient-centred communication, developments in information technology, and components of solution-focused therapy. The overall aim of this study is to improve the mental health, resilience and quality of life of children and adolescents from Tolima, Colombia, taking into account the additional context of this post-conflict setting during the added stress of the current COVID-19 pandemic. This will be done by training (online and face-to-face) teachers and school counsellors from this region in mental health in order to allow them to develop strategies for the promotion of mental wellbeing and the prevention and early detection of mental health problems. Strengthening of educators' capacities will be achieved whilst modifying and exploring DIALOG+ - a proven technology-assisted tablet/smartphone-based and resource-oriented intervention - as a generic approach for mental health problems identified in adolescents. This exploratory study will provide the information required to conduct a definitive trial that will show if this intervention will help reduce the current treatment gap experienced by children and adolescents with symptoms of mental distress in this, and similar contexts.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-ES_V013114_1

Start Date:

2021-02-14

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£193,185.07


NIHR Global Health Research Units and Groups: research call 1

UK - Department of Health (DH)

The NIHR's first Global Health Research call for Units and Groups. UK universities and research institutes were invited to submit applications, working in equitable partnerships with researchers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), to either expand (Units) or develop (Groups) their ambitions to deliver world-class applied global health research to address under-funded or under-researched global health areas specific to those countries.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-10-NIHR_GHRUG1

Start Date:

2017-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£128,940,425.80


FCDO - ReBUILD - Health Systems Financing

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

The goal of the health systems financing RPC is to generate high quality evidence that contributes to improving the health of the poorest in LMIC states. The purpose is to deliver new knowledge to inform the development and implementation of pro-poor health systems.

Programme identifier:

GB-CHC-222655-PO5247ReBUILD

Start Date:

2011-02-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£128,721


GCRF_NF72 Development, evaluation and implementation of a digital support to improve the management of cancer and mitagate the impact of COVID-19

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Over half a million people in Vietnam currently live with cancer or provide care to a relative or friend with the disease. Support and care in the form of palliative care or supportive units are rare in Vietnam. As a result, 70% of patients die at home, in the care of their families. Many families affected by cancer manage severe health issues with minimal knowledge and little help from health care professionals. Providing this care can have a significant negative impact on the carer's health and their ability to work. These challenges have worsened due to COVID-19 as many hospitals appointments throughout Vietnam were cancelled or treatments postponed. As a consequence of these disruptions, many families are managing cancer in isolation. Prior to 'lockdown', we conducted workshops with 100 patients, carers and health care professionals across five regions of Vietnam. Patients and families reported that they require urgent assistance to understand cancer, manage medications, daily personal care needs, nutrition, wound care, emotional issues, how to tell if a patient's health is getting worse and when you should seek help. In response to these needs, we hosted a workshop in March 2020 with cancer experts from across Vietnam to design a remote digital cancer management tool to provide families the support, information and skills they require. This project aims to develop this digital resource called V-CCC (Vietnam -Cancer Caring Coping) to support families to manage cancer remotely. The team have developed a written version of the digital support V-CCC. This project will 1) Develop the digital version of V-CCC 2) Evaluate the impact V-CCC may have on patient and carer outcomes 3) Explore V-CCC usage throughout the country. We will develop the best possible digital advice and information by working together as a large group of doctors, nurses, carers, patients, academics and allied health professionals from across all regions of Vietnam. An expert digital supports team will transfer this information online ensuring that it is easy to use e.g. videos/pictures/ interactive games. We will demonstrate the V-CCC in workshops involving 50 carers from five different regions of Vietnam (Hanoi, HCMC, Hue, Danang and Can Tho). Changes will be made to V-CCC based on this feedback. We will then evaluate the V-CCC with 150 carers (and patients if willing) across five cancer hospitals (Hanoi, Ho Chi Mhin City, Can Tho, Danang and Hue). Nurses in cancer hospitals will recruit participants and assist them to complete baseline measures (mental health, quality of life, health literacy). Cancer carers will be provided with a web-link and access code to V-CCC for two weeks. Participants will be asked to complete follow-up surveys identical to those they completed at the onset. We will then conduct 30 online interviews over Skype with a range of carers to explore their experiences of using V-CCC. We will also ask N=15 Health Care professionals to share their thoughts and experiences of V-CCC interviews. Following evaluation, partners will widely distribute V-CCC throughout Vietnam using hospital clinics, waiting rooms, advocacy groups and social media. We will use google analytics to explore how many people access the resource, from which region and how long they use the resource for. We hope that V-CCC will reduce isolation, poor management and ultimately deterioration of cancer outcomes that have increased due to COVID-19. The lessons we learn during this project will be exchanged with our academic partners in Colombia , Uganda and Malaysia so that they too can learn how remote digital management tools may be useful in those countries.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-EP_V028146_1

Start Date:

2020-08-14

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£219,958.60


OPTIMIZING RICE NUTRITION THOUGH POST-HARVEST PROCESSING

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The subsistence farmers and urban and rural poor are malnourished in terms of mineral nutrients and vitamins. Bangladesh has among the highest per capita rice consumption in the world at 420g/d. Although rice is an important dietary source for a range of macro- and micro- essential elements, and for a range of B-Vitamins (B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B9), it undersupplies the majority of these, while oversupplies carbohydrate. Also, there is a need to produce more rice as the population is growing while agronomic landmass is shrinking, and labour is moving from the countryside to the cities. The low nutritional value of rice and its oversupply of calories, along with concerns about enough being produced to feed the populace, is a classic example of the double burden of malnutrition. The carbohydrate oversupply is thought to be behind a rise in type-2 diabetes amongst the urban poor of Bangladesh. Calcium and vitamins B1, B3, B6 & B9, and dietary fibre all have a role in counteracting type-2 diabetes, so if these, and other nutrients present in rice, can be enhanced in they will be highly beneficial with respect to rice be a causative agent of diabetes, while also being generally beneficial in fighting malnutrition in general. This application sets out the research needed to improve both the volume and the nutritional quality of rice produced in Bangladesh that reaches the consumer through altering post harvesting processing. Most rice is eaten parboiled in Bangladesh meaning that this centralized process can be optimised to enhance nutritional value of this comodity that has a wide reach to the populace, in general. Milling preference varies quite widely in Bangladesh, with the urban and rural landless poor eating mainly highly polished rice, and subsistence farmers wholegrain or highly polished. Parboiling generally enhances both elemental and B-vitamins in rice, while polishing removes both organic and inorganic nutrients, along with dietary fibre. Our preliminary, conducted throughout Bangladesh) studies show that we can enhance calcium by 100% in milled rice by parboiling wholegrain, as opposed to rough rice, while removing 25% of the carcinogen inorganic arsenic (a wide-scale problem in rice, particularly in Bangladesh), and lowering of Bacillus cereus (a widespread cause of food poisoning from rice) infection of subsequently cooked rice. Thus, optimising parboiling is a way to enhance the nutritional status of rice, across minerals and vitamins. Also, subsistence farmers have a preference for wholegrain or lightly milled rice, and if milling degree can be lowered for market rice consumed by the rural and urban poor, testing at all stages consumer acceptance, this will have double benefit in fighting the double burden of nutrition that rice poses, enhancing the potential health benefits of rice (miner nutrients, B-vitamins, dietary fibre), while enhancing the yield of rice that actually reaches market through less wastage as bran. The grant's work plans will systematically set out the optimal post-harvest treatment of rice to address the double burden of nutrition.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-BB_T008822_1

Start Date:

2020-02-14

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£946,715.85


Development of a biopsychosocial translational research programme in post-traumatic stress disorder.

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a complex psychiatric disorder that generates social and profesional difficulties for those who suffer from it. This disorder is triggered by exposure to traumatic events throughout life and characterized by symptoms such as intrusive memories and avoidance behaviors. Multiple studies have identified multiple genetic factors that increase a person's risk of developing PTSD after exposure to a traumatic event. However, these studies have identified many genes and research on the precise role of each of these genetic elements in PTSD is scarce. Moreover, we know very little about the precise neurobiological bases of this disorder and how these interact with social and psychological constructs, and thus more research is needed to understand which processes in the brain become altered in PTSD in order to find an efficient treatment. Recently, a protein involved in synaptic transmission (communication between neurons), neuroligin 1 (nlgn1), has been linked to the risk of developing PTSD. This protein has been previously linked to other psychiatric disorders associated with PTSD, such as anxiety and major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia. The role of the nlgn1 protein in the development of PTSD is unknown, but a number of recent studies suggest it plays an important role in PTSD and the modulation of stress behavior in general. The aim of this proposal is to develop a translational research program, integrating laboratory and clinical research to better understand vulnerability and resilience for PTSD. We propose to develop a mental health program for populations exposed to the armed conflict in municipalities of the department of Cesar, Colombia. Here, we will initially combine epidemiological, clinical and biological approaches to perform a complete evaluation of risk factors, symptoms and outcomes of PTSD in people exposed to the Colombian armed conflict. In parallel we will use a zebrafish animal model to manipulate the nlgn1 gene and study how this alteration affects zebrafish response to stress, anxiety and patterns of gene expression in the brain. Finally, we will combine both components of this study by evaluating how much the nlgn1 gene, and other genes along its pathway, vary across the studied PTSD patients in our study cohort in Cesar, Colombia. Our work will greatly contribute to understanding the molecular underpinnings of PTSD, as well as currently lacking data on PTSD risk and resilience factors among Latino populations, while providing access to a mental health program in a population long affected by violence. Findings of this study could be transferred and applied to the improvement of public health policies to improve the psychological wellbeing and quality of life of those exposed to armed conflict in Colombia.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-ES_V013327_1

Start Date:

2021-02-10

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£326,756.50


Building resilience and resources to overcome depression and anxiety in young people from urban neighbourhoods in Latin America

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Background The numbers of people with depression and anxiety greatly increases during adolescence. Adolescents who live in big cities more commonly experience stressful events such as conflict, poverty, substance misuse and social isolation. This includes adolescents from Latin America - which is the most urban part of the world. Although many individuals experience stressful events, the majority do not develop either depression or anxiety. Furthermore, when people do experience them, up to half recover within a year. This raises the question of what helps people to prevent depression and anxiety, and what helps people recover. We have called these resilience factors. Our aim is to understand resilience factors so we can develop new approaches to treat depression and anxiety. Objectives The overall aim is to identify resilience factors that are linked to either prevention of depression and anxiety, or to recovery. We will focus on adolescents and young people who live in three large Latin American cities - Buenos Aires, Bogotá and Peru. To achieve this, we aim to: 1. Develop new ways of measuring resilience factors that can be used with adolescents and young people, 2. Identify which resilience factors prevent depression and anxiety, 3. Identify which resilience factors help adolescent and young people to recover from depression and anxiety within one year, 4. Develop case studies about existing approaches that promote prevention and recovery, 5. Build up the research skills and knowledge of researchers in Latin America, 6. Involve adolescents and young people through an interactive arts-based project. Methods The project is organised into six work packages (WPs). In the WP1, we will ask young people and staff who work in schools, youth organisations and healthcare services to help us develop new ways of measuring resilience factors to create an assessment tool. The new tool will be used in a study that will compare 1020 adolescents (15-16 years old) and young people (20-24 years old) with depression and anxiety to 1020 adolescents and young people without. We will look at personal factors such as health behaviours and social factors including relationships. We will test if there are differences between the two groups. This will help us discover which factors are linked to prevention. The individuals who have depression and anxiety will be asked to complete the same measures after one year. We will compare individuals who recovered from depression and anxiety to those who did not. This will tell us about recovery. To promote prevention and recovery we will conduct interviews with participants who did and did not recover and with different stakeholders. This will help us identify areas of ""good-practice"" which we will write up as case studies. This may include initiatives such as health centres or social-groups in the community (WP4). So that researchers in Latin America can continue studying resilience and recovery, we will provide training and activities focused on research skills (WP5). Finally, we want to involve adolescents and young people in our research. To do this, we will run an arts-based project where we will ask those with depression and anxiety to use different materials such as photographs, films, and graffiti to document their experience. We will hold exhibitions to display the art. We hope this will encourage other young people to get involved in research (WP6). Expected results The project will lead to new knowledge about what prevents depression and anxiety and what help people recover. Understanding this will help us develop new approaches to improve the mental health of adolescents and young people and reduce the burden of mental disorders. Our communication methods will ensure the research is widely disseminated. Although the project focuses on Latin America, our learning will help other countries, including many Low and Middle Income countries, which are becoming more urban.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-MR_S03580X_1

Start Date:

2019-09-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£2,950,074.46


The impact of microbial and inflammatory exposures on birth outcomes in rural Zimbabwe

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

One in seven babies in Africa are born with low birthweight, either because they are born too small (small-for-gestational age; SGA) or born too soon (preterm). Babies born SGA or preterm have a higher risk of dying, and do not grow as well in early life, leading to a higher risk of malnutrition. The most common form of malnutrition (stunting) affects health into adulthood, reduces learning at school, and lowers earning potential. To reduce child deaths and improve health, growth and prosperity throughout life, it is essential to improve birthweight. To do this, we need to understand the processes during pregnancy that lead to SGA and preterm. The fetus depends on a delicate balance of processes to grow properly and be delivered on time. Infections during pregnancy, and activation of the body's defence system to tackle infections (called inflammation) may disturb these processes, leading to SGA and preterm birth. Mothers with sexually transmitted infections, urinary tract infections, gum disease or diarrhoea during pregnancy have a higher risk of SGA and preterm birth. Inflammation can also occur even when a pregnant woman is not sick with an infection. There are trillions of bacteria in the body, called the microbiome, which generally do not cause disease. However, a change in composition of the microbiome can cause inflammation. Unbalanced vaginal, oral and gut microbiomes in pregnant mothers have all been associated with SGA and preterm birth, although most of these studies have been done in high-income countries. It is unclear whether and how disturbed microbiomes cause inflammation, SGA and preterm birth in Africa. We believe that taking antibiotics in pregnancy could improve birth outcomes by reducing harmful infections and inflammation. In order to test this, we will take advantage of an existing trial examining whether a daily antibiotic (called cotrimoxazole) during pregnancy can increase birthweight. We previously found that this antibiotic reduces inflammation as well as preventing infections. During the new study, 1000 women in rural Zimbabwe will receive either cotrimoxazole or placebo from the time they first book their pregnancy at the local clinic up until birth. The treatment will be decided randomly, like the flip of a coin. During pregnancy, oral samples (tongue swabs, dental plaque, saliva), vaginal swabs, stool, urine and blood will be collected from all mothers when they book and at 26, 34 and 36 weeks into pregnancy. Our first aim is to see whether infections and inflammation during pregnancy are associated with SGA and preterm birth. Women will be examined by a dentist to check their oral health and be tested for sexually transmitted infections, urine infections and diarrhoea, with treatment provided if needed. Using the oral, vaginal and stool samples collected from booking and the end of pregnancy, we will study the microbiome and inflammation to see if they are linked to SGA and preterm birth. Our second aim is to compare the microbiome and inflammation in 100 women receiving the antibiotic and 100 women receiving placebo. We will see whether cotrimoxazole reduces inflammation, infections, or changes the microbiome during pregnancy. We will also test whether bacteria become resistant to the antibiotic. Our third aim is to see what effect maternal antibiotics have on the baby. We will collect samples of the placenta, blood and stool at birth, and collect stool and blood again when they are 4 weeks old, to compare infections, microbiome and inflammation in babies whose mothers received antibiotics or placebo in pregnancy. Through this project, we hope to understand whether infections, microbiome disturbances and inflammation during pregnancy cause SGA and preterm birth, and exactly how the antibiotic works (if at all). This is important, because we may be able to design new treatments that can be given during pregnancy to help babies grow better and be born on time.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-MR_T039337_1

Start Date:

2021-01-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,076,224.55


Developing a policy to reduce the salt content of food consumed outside the home in Malaysia

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Salt intake in Malaysia is very high, with an average intake of around 9g per day. A high salt intake raises blood pressure and high blood pressure increases the risk of developing a cardiovascular disease (CVD), which includes stroke and heart disease. Almost a third of adults have high blood pressure in Malaysia and CVD is the main cause of death and disability, which places a huge burden on communities and health services. We previously assessed awareness and knowledge of salt in Malaysia. The majority of the population knew that eating too much salt could cause health problems but more than half thought they consumed just the right amount of salt. We also found that foods consumed outside the home e.g. from restaurants are major contributors of salt to the typical diet and the majority of the population eat out on a regular basis. The salt content of food consumed outside the home is likely to be very high, but without nutrition labelling consumers are unaware of the salt content. We will interview stakeholders across the country to determine what factors they feel might prevent a policy to reduce salt levels in the out of home sector and we will use this data to develop a strategy, addressing all issues raised. We will then gain commitment from policy makers to implement our strategy as policy. To ensure engagement and support for the policy, we will organise workshops to explain to chefs and other food industry representatives why salt should be reduced, and the methods they can use to reduce salt in food. Our work will benefit the entire population - almost everyone stands to benefit from a reduction in salt intake as almost everyone eats far more salt than recommended.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-MR_V005847_1

Start Date:

2020-06-12

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£74,485.81


A prospective multicenter birth cohort study of iron adaptive homeostasis, growth and development in three Peruvian regions

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Peru is a South American country which in the last two decades has experienced a continuous economic growth and has improved its population wealth. However, in Peru still a large proportion of children are suffering from anaemia due to insufficient iron levels in their blood. That situation generates a great hazard to the future of Peruvian children and their adult health. The roots of this problem are likely to be complex because numerous ecological, biological, social and political factors explain in part the persistence of anaemia. The majority of the government interventions are currently focussed on treatment and not to prevention. However, treating this disease might have side effects, as too much iron, interacting with other nutritional or environmental factors, can also negatively affect growth and development. In this project, we will study the complexity of environmental and nutritional factors that alter the mechanisms of iron balance in a group of Peruvian babies, from birth to their first year of life. Children and their mothers will be studied in 3 cities in Peru located on the coast, the Andes and the Amazon. Various measurements and samples of water, blood, faeces will be made; baby size measurement, interviews, nutritional observation and focus groups with participating mothers will be collected. Some health policies and strategies implemented in the past will also be evaluated.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-MR_S024654_1

Start Date:

2019-04-15

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£609,410.10


Mozambique

Sightsavers

Programme Oversight

Programme identifier:

GB-CHC-207544-42MOZ

Start Date:

2012-01-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,785,354


Data Analysis and Reporting

Sightsavers

Sightsavers’ analysis and reporting function supports the commission and delivery of robust and meaningful project evaluations to inform our work, improve project design and generate wider learnings

Programme identifier:

GB-CHC-207544-41DART

Start Date:

2019-01-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£767,475


Zambia

Sightsavers

Programme Oversight

Programme identifier:

GB-CHC-207544-42ZAM

Start Date:

2012-01-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£2,150,345


Malawi

Sightsavers

Programme Oversight

Programme identifier:

GB-CHC-207544-42MLW

Start Date:

2012-01-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£2,213,869


Uganda

Sightsavers

Programme Oversight

Programme identifier:

GB-CHC-207544-42UGD

Start Date:

2012-01-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£2,094,584


School-based education programme to reduce salt: Scaling-up in China (EduSaltS)

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

High salt intake increases the risk of high blood pressure, strokes, heart disease, and several other chronic diseases such as stomach cancer. Salt intake in China is very high with an average of 12-14 gram per day, more than double the WHO recommended level of 5 gram per day. Unlike the UK and other developed countries, 75%-80% of the salt in the Chinese diet is added by the consumers during cooking or in sauces. An effective strategy to reduce salt from home cooking is of great urgency and importance, not only for China, but also for many other developing countries. However, it is very difficult for individuals to change their eating habits. Our proposed research will build upon a successfully-tested pilot study entitled ""School-based education programme to reduce Salt"" (School-EduSalt) in China, in which primary school children were educated, during their usual health education lessons, about the effects of salt on health and how to reduce salt intake. Children then instructed their family members to reduce the amount of salt used during food preparations at home. The results of this pilot study have shown that the school-based education is very effective in reducing salt intake in children and adults. The pilot study was carried out in one city called Changzhi, in northern China. We now propose to do a study to test whether we can scale up a refined School-EduSalt programme in multiple settings, to reduce salt in larger populations in China, including the poorest population living in the remote and rural areas. This scale-up study will be carried out in three regions of China including Beijing (capital of China), Shijiazhuang (in the north) and Zhenjiang (in the south), covering a population of over 1 million school children and 2.2 million adults. The study will involve a number of important stakeholders, including governmental organisations, and the health and education authorities of the three regions. Based on WHO's Conceptual Framework for Scaling up, we will work with these stakeholders to develop, implement and evaluate a feasible scale-up package, which will be integrated into the existing school health education system to ensure sustainable scaling-up. The scale-up package will be evaluated in three aspects: effectiveness, process and health economics. We will assess whether the education programme can improve the participants' knowledge, attitudes and practices towards salt reduction. Additionally, we will assess whether the education programme can achieve a sustainable reduction in salt intake which will be measured by the gold standard method of 24-hour urine collection. Our ultimate aim is to incorporate the refined education programme into the national school curriculum, so that all schools in China will follow. A nation-wide implementation will have an enormous impact on reducing population salt intake. A reduction in salt intake across the whole population, even by a small amount, will lower population blood pressure and prevent hundreds of thousands of strokes, heart attacks and heart failure each year, and also lead to major cost-savings to individuals, their families and the health service.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-MR_T024399_1

Start Date:

2019-12-02

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


Kenya

Sightsavers

Programme Oversight

Programme identifier:

GB-CHC-207544-42KEN

Start Date:

2012-01-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£2,368,160


Policy and Strategic Programme Support Directorate

Sightsavers

Policy and programmes strategy department focusses on funding core programme strategic oversight and activities related to innovation and SDG implementation

Programme identifier:

GB-CHC-207544-51PS2

Start Date:

2012-01-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£2,448,746


Research for Health in Humanitarian Crises 2020-2025

Elrha

The R2HC is a globally recognised research programme focuses on maximising the potential for public health research to bring about positive change in humanitarian response and helps inform decision making in humanitarian response.

Programme identifier:

GB-CHC-1177110-R2HC

Start Date:

2020-05-18

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£2,177,502


Research and development of vaccines

Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations

CEPI’s vision is a world in which epidemics and pandemics are no longer a threat to humanity. Going into the strategic period from 2022-2026, termed “CEPI 2.0”, CEPI aims to raise the bar to develop and scale vaccines and other promising biologic countermeasures even faster. The R&D community has moved with unprecedented speed in response to COVID-19, developing biological interventions like vaccines and monoclonal antibodies in less than 12 months. While these achievements are historic, what the world needs to avert the consequences of future epidemics and pandemics are countermeasures developed even faster. CEPI’s mission is to accelerate the development of vaccines and other biologic countermeasures against epidemic and pandemic threats so they can be accessible to all people in need. CEPI believes safe and effective vaccine in 100 days from the moment that a pathogen is sequenced and/ or the need for a vaccine is recognised to initial availability for use should be the aspiration. Over the strategic period, CEPI aims to invest USD 3.5 billion across three overall strategic objectives:

Programme identifier:

NO-BRC-917687811-CEPI_02

Start Date:

2016-08-30

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0




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