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Search Results for: "Energy Saving Trust"

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Now showing projects 3 of 3

Green Africa Power LLP

Private Infrastructure Development Group

GAP has the ambitious target to finance approximately 270MW of new renewable energy generation capacity in four years, saving 3.9m tonnes of carbon emissions and improving the supply of clean energy to millions of people in Africa.;

Project Identifier:
XM-DAC-47086-GAP
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
04-04-2013
Total Budget:
£395,000,000


Low Energy Inclusive Appliances

UK - Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO)

To undertake research to accelerate the availability, affordability, efficiency and performance of Low Energy Inclusive Appliances (LEIA) suited to developing country contexts. Domestic and small-industrial electrical appliances are key to increasing the impact of energy access for poor consumers, expanding the markets for household solar and mini-grid systems, and enabling the most efficient use of available power where the grid is unreliable.”

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-1-300111
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
11-09-2017
Total Budget:
£18,199,759


The Cultural Contexts of Disease Prevention: The Case of Cholangiocarcinoma in Mainland Southeast Asia

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

1. To explore ways of significantly reducing the high number of unnecessary deaths from diet-related cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) in Southeast Asia in general, and specifically in the areas of Northeast Thailand (Isan) most heavily affected by the disease. We aim to achieve this through promoting a more culturally sensitive understanding and approach to behaviours that lead to the development of CCA in the region. 2. To draw on the case study of diet-related CCA in Isan, and more widely in Southeast Asia, in order to foster greater understanding of the cultural factors at play in epidemiology in LMICs; and to thence develop nuanced strategies for making culturally sensitive yet effective public health interventions in connection with a range of global health challenges. Strategies for intervention would be articulated, in part, in the form of journal articles and consultancy papers co-authored by authors from an innovative range of disciplinary backgrounds. 3.To develop a close working relationship between the PI, Co-Is, academic and non-academic partners in Southeast Asia in order to build an in-depth and nuanced understanding of the complexities of the challenge facing medical health workers and public health campaigners in the region in their engagement with diet-related liver fluke infestation (opistorchiasis) and CCA. We believe that this can be achieved only through sensitive, open-minded and respectful engagement across academic disciplines, across languages and across cultures; and, in addition through the careful development of an openness to listen to the lived experience of those at risk of, or diagnosed with, opistorchiasis and CCA. By inviting the latter to participate as co-researchers in their own health concerns our objective is to build capacity from the grassroots in order to develop an engaged and agential involvement in healthcare and wellbeing in the region. The objectives of this approach have capacity building implications for a range of other LMICs as well as those working in public health in the UK. 4. To extend and build upon the network of academics from the fields of medicine and the humanities in the UK and Southeast Asia, and especially Thailand, in relation to opistorchiasis and CCA in Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. This would be achieved through an engagement, for example, with patients from Laos treated for CCA at Khon Kaen U Hospital; through an engagement with the Pasteur Institute in Vientiane, Laos; in partnership with Grundy-Warr's (NU Singapore) existing work in Cambodia; and through the Wellcome Trust supported work with tropical diseases in Vietnam. Extending the network in a series of workshops and discussion groups beyond the focus point of Isan will permit us to test out the extent to which socio-cultural and politico-historical factors colour the relationship between diet and disease, since although the disease and its diet-related causes remain the same in each case, the cultural contexts in which the disease develops differ to some extent. 5. To explore and advance the effectiveness of multidisciplinary approaches to a specific public health problem as well as to consider the limits of this effectiveness. Our joint workshops and field research activities bring together academics from a range of disciplines that do not normally interact with each other (in medicine, nursing, palliative care, public health, medical and cultural anthropology, cultural studies, history, human and physical geography, ecology, biology, parasitology, socio-linguistics, postcolonial theory, literature, cinema, Buddhist studies and phenomenology.) The academic network would further engage with local NGOs and organisations such as the Buddhist Network for a Good Death and the Thai Palliative Care Society as well as local writers, artists and filmmakers from Isan. 6. To learn from Thai Buddhist approaches to dyingand death as well as to cultural memory that can inform new models of palliative care in the UK

Project Identifier:
GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-AH_R00613X_1
Activity Status:
Implementation
Start Date:
01-11-2017
Total Budget:
£170,961


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