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FCDO ODA allocations for 2021/22 were announced on 21 April 2021. Changes to individual programmes are underway. The information on this website may not reflect the latest allocated budgets for this year. This information will be updated in due course.

UK aid from the British people

Kenya

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Modernisation of official statistics

Office for National Statistics

The programme provides high-quality technical assistance, mainly through experts from the UK Office for National Statistics, to build the capacity of statistical systems in developing countries. We have key partnerships with national statistical offices globally, primarily in Africa.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-24-001

Start Date:

2021-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£3,000,000


Askari Serpent

Ministry of Defence

This relates to the provision of vaccinations to the local population in Kenya.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-8-Askari Serpent

Start Date:

2016-01-01

Activity Status:

Finalisation

Total Budget:

$0


Darwin Initiative Round 26

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

The Darwin Initiative is a UK government grants scheme that helps to protect biodiversity and the natural environment through locally based projects worldwide. The initiative funds projects that help countries rich in biodiversity but poor in financial resources to meet their objectives under one or more of the biodiversity conventions. The objective is to to address threats to biodiversity such as: - habitat loss or degradation - climate change - invasive species - over-exploitation - pollution and eutrophication

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-DAR26

Start Date:

2020-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

$5,607,898


Darwin Initiative Round 24

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

The Darwin Initiative is a UK government grants scheme that helps to protect biodiversity and the natural environment through locally based projects worldwide. The initiative funds projects that help countries rich in biodiversity but poor in financial resources to meet their objectives under one or more of the biodiversity conventions. The objective is to to address threats to biodiversity such as: - habitat loss or degradation - climate change - invasive species - over-exploitation - pollution and eutrophication

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-DAR24

Start Date:

2018-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

$10,604,188


Darwin Initiative Round 23

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

The Darwin Initiative is a UK government grants scheme that helps to protect biodiversity and the natural environment through locally based projects worldwide. The initiative funds projects that help countries rich in biodiversity but poor in financial resources to meet their objectives under one or more of the biodiversity conventions. The objective is to to address threats to biodiversity such as: - habitat loss or degradation - climate change - invasive species - over-exploitation - pollution and eutrophication.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-DAR23

Start Date:

2018-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

$7,619,619


Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund Round 3

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

Illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is the fifth most lucrative transnational crime, worth up to £17bn a year globally. As well as threatening species with extinction, IWT destroys vital ecosystems. IWT also fosters corruption, feeds insecurity, and undermines good governance and the rule of law. The UK government is committed to tackling illegal trade of wildlife products. Defra manages the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, which is a competitive grants scheme with the objective of tackling illegal wildlife trade and, in doing so, contributing to sustainable development in developing countries. Projects funded under the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund address one, or more, of the following themes: • Developing sustainable livelihoods to benefit people directly affected by IWT • Strengthening law enforcement • Ensuring effective legal frameworks • Reducing demand for IWT products Over £23 million has been committed to 75 projects since the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund was established in 2013; five projects were awarded in 2014 (via applications to the Darwin Initiative), fourteen in 2015, fifteen in 2016, thirteen in 2017, fourteen in 2018 and in the latest round in 2019. This round of funding includes the following projects (details of which can be found at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/811381/iwt-project-list-2019.pdf). The projects that a relevant for this area are IWT035 to IWT047.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-IWTCF-R3

Start Date:

2017-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

$4,123,118


Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund Round 4

Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

Illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is the fifth most lucrative transnational crime, worth up to £17bn a year globally. As well as threatening species with extinction, IWT destroys vital ecosystems. IWT also fosters corruption, feeds insecurity, and undermines good governance and the rule of law. The UK government is committed to tackling illegal trade of wildlife products. Defra manages the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, which is a competitive grants scheme with the objective of tackling illegal wildlife trade and, in doing so, contributing to sustainable development in developing countries. Projects funded under the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund address one, or more, of the following themes: • Developing sustainable livelihoods to benefit people directly affected by IWT • Strengthening law enforcement • Ensuring effective legal frameworks • Reducing demand for IWT products Over £23 million has been committed to 75 projects since the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund was established in 2013; five projects were awarded in 2014 (via applications to the Darwin Initiative), fourteen in 2015, fifteen in 2016, thirteen in 2017, fourteen in 2018 and in the latest round in 2019. This round of funding includes the following projects (details of which can be found at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/811381/iwt-project-list-2019.pdf): IWT048, IWT049, IWT050, IWT051, IWT052, IWT053, IWT054, IWT055, IWT056, IWT057, IWT058, IWT059, IWT0760, IWT061.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-7-IWTCF-R4

Start Date:

2018-07-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

$4,505,210


Fleming Fund – Country and Regional Grants and Fellowships Programme

UK - Department of Health (DH)

The Fleming Fund helps low- and middle-income countries to fight antimicrobial resistance. A management agent has been appointed to deliver: country grants 24 low- and middle-income countries, regional grants in West Africa, East and Southern Africa, South Asia and South East Asia, and a global fellowships programme. These initiatives aim to improve laboratory capacity and diagnosis as well as data and surveillance of antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-10-FF_MA

Start Date:

2016-10-10

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

$258,497,532.75


I&M Holdings

CDC Group plc

Investment by CDC into I&M Holdings to support access to finance in East Africa.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F313601

Start Date:

2016-09-30

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

$0


ARM Cement

CDC Group plc

Investment by CDC in ARM Cement bringing jobs and lower cost raw materials to a region traditionally dependent on imports. The supply chain of SMEs that transport the company’s raw materials and provide general services will also benefit economically from the company’s growth.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F313501

Start Date:

2016-09-29

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

$0


M-Kopa

CDC Group plc

Investment by CDC in M-Kopa. M-Kopa is Africa's leading off-grid solar provider bringing solar home systems to households who currently have no access to electricity

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F314201

Start Date:

2016-09-16

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

$0


Garden City

CDC Group plc

An equity investment by CDC into Garden City. Garden City is a mixed-used development comprising retail, office and residential components in Nairobi, Kenya. The project will create over 650 direct jobs during the construction phase and over 800 more once completed. The development also aims to contribute to improving skills for workers and local firms involved in the development of the project.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F307101

Start Date:

2013-12-19

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

$0


Africa Logistics Properties

CDC Group plc

Africa Logistics Properties develops and manages modern logistics and warehousing facilities across Africa. The cost of moving goods in Africa is up to two or three times higher than in developed countries and transport costs can count for as much as 50-75 per cent of the retail price of goods. Our investment will help improve the agricultural supply chain and get produce to market faster, as well as improve the transportation of essential medication.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F315501

Start Date:

2017-03-02

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

$0


Akiira Geothermal

CDC Group plc

Investment by CDC in Akiira Geothermal to support a 42MW geothermal project in order to meet demand for electricty.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F312101

Start Date:

2016-04-12

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

$0


Malindi Solar Project

CDC Group plc

The addition of 40MW of solar power to the Kenyan generation capacity. In terms of beneficiaries this increase in generation is expected to benefit industry (52% of demand), households (26% of demand) and small businesses (22% of demand) and support the creation of 5,637 jobs.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-F320301

Start Date:

2018-05-23

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

$0


M-KOPA (Kenya)

CDC Group plc

Headquartered in Nairobi, M-Kopa is one of Africa’s fastest growing, pay-as-you-go solar energy companies. It currently provides off-grid energy to 500,000 low-income households in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. East Africa suffers from a poor infrastructure, which makes power inaccessible to many households, as well as unreliable and expensive. M-Kopa is a solar-powered system that gives its predominantly low-income customer base access to lighting, phone charging, radio and TV on daily mobile money payment plans that are less than the typical cost of kerosene.

Project identifier:

GB-COH-03877777-D400601

Start Date:

2017-06-30

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

$0


Development in Africa with Radio Astronomy Phase 2

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

We will conduct a training programme in radio astronomy in Africa that will help to drive economic growth. South Africa is hosting part of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) - the major next generation radio telescope and the first big science project on the African continent. A network of up to 2000 dishes will eventually spread out across southern Africa to give the telescope its powerful resolution to see small structures in the sky. To this aim South Africa is partnering with eight other countries in Africa that will host these outstations. However, there is virtually no astronomy activity in these countries at present and so SKA-SA are building the African VLBI Network (AVN) as a precursor instrument and very useful addition to the world's radio astronomy networks in its own right. The AVN will consist of 30 m class radio dishes in each partner country, either converted from defunct telecommunications dishes or newly built ones. The UK team has experience in the conversion of old telecommunications dishes for radio astronomy purposes through its involvement in a similar project at the Goonhilly Earth Station in Cornwall. The UK team, together with SA colleagues, will provide a basic training in the AVN countries so that the local people can use and help run the radio telescopes there. The STEM skills learnt as part of this training can be applied to a range of industries such as telecommunications, space science, land management and computing. Therefore the training will result in a pool of local talent who can help to drive economic growth in the AVN countries. An integral part of the training programme will be interaction with entrepreneurs who have experience of setting up businesses using related technologies. Advanced training will take the form of a number of MSc and PhD bursaries. The students will undertake research training using the interferometric radio telescopes and spend time in both the UK and SA to help forge strong research links. A virtual centre of excellence will be established that pulls the various strands of training, research and industry together. Showcasing the radio astronomy facilities in these countries and demonstrating how the skills and technologies used in radio astronomy can be applied to many areas of industry and commerce can lead to a general upskilling of the population.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-ST_R001103_1

Start Date:

2017-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£2,550,000


Building Out Vector-borne diseases in sub-Saharan Africa: the BOVA Network

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

In the past, many infectious diseases in Europe and North America were addressed by installing clean water, good sanitation and housing. Today global health focuses on water and sanitation, but there is comparatively little research done on housing and health. This is a missed opportunity, since many important diseases transmitted by insects, occur indoors or around the home. The goal of this Network is to make communities in sub-Saharan Africa more resilient to the threat from insect-transmitted diseases; chiefly malaria, a rural disease, and diseases carried by Aedes species mosquitoes, like Zika and dengue, which are primarily urban diseases. To achieve this goal we need to find new solutions to stop mosquitoes entering houses and, for Aedes-borne diseases, to reduce the aquatic habitats in towns and cities. Whilst this may sound common sense, despite repeated attempts, we have been singularly unsuccessful in bring together experts in insect-transmitted diseases and the built environment over the past 50 years. There is an even greater necessity to break down these silos today since the World Health Organisation will launch its global strategy on the control of insect-transmitted diseases in May 2017 which advocates for the need to control vector-borne diseases by experts in vector-borne diseases working alongside those in the built environment. The BOVA Network, if funded, would be in the vanguard of this new strategy helping to protect communities in sub-Saharan Africa from these major insect-borne diseases. The Management Board that will run the Network is an extremely diverse group with experts on insect-transmitted diseases, architecture, civil engineering, town planning, development, product development, industry, health economics and community participation; from sub-Saharan Africa and developed countries. This exceptional pool of talent will allow us to link-up with larger groups of experts and the Network grant will provide the springboard for us to grow a new scientific discipline. Specifically the Network will: 1) facilitate the exchange of information about insect-transmitted diseases and the built environment between disciplines, 2) fund basic and applied research to develop and scale-up products and novel approaches to reducing the threat from insect-transmitted diseases in the built environment, 3) help build the next generation of scientists, architects, engineers and planners developing approaches to the control of these diseases and 4) to reach out to funders and those engaged in development projects, like United Nations organisations and the Development Banks to invest in the control of vector-borne diseases through the built environment. This Network is designed to help protect the citizens of sub-Saharan Africa from the threat of insect-transmitted diseases and has the potential to change the lives of millions.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-BB_R00532X_1

Start Date:

2017-07-03

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,142,596.56


The Tick Cell Biobank - a UK and international biological resource

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Ticks are bloodfeeding arthropods which, as well as causing direct damage to their hosts, transmit many diseases of livestock, companion animals and humans. Research into prevention and cure of these diseases, caused by viruses, bacteria, protozoa and filarial worms, is greatly assisted by the use of cell culture systems to study both how tick cells function, and how and why they transmit disease-causing pathogens. Such culture systems, called cell lines, have been developed for many disease-carrying ticks, but they require special skills and much time and patience to establish and maintain. Seven years ago a central collection, the Tick Cell Biobank (TCB), was created for all the tick cell lines available now and in future. The TCB distributes tick cell lines (TCL) on request to research scientists all over the world and provides essential training in their maintenance. The TCB also carries out characterisation studies on TCL, as very little is known about most of them, and is creating new cell lines from species of ticks not already represented in the collection. This proposal requests funding to secure the long-term future of the TCB as an essential resource underpinning UK and international tick and tick-borne disease research, to expand the resource to include cell lines derived from other important arthropods such as biting midges, mites and honeybees, and to give added value to the cell lines through characterisation, cloning and genome sequencing, thereby ensuring that these unique and invaluable biological resources continue to be available to the scientists who need to use them in biomedical, veterinary and agricultural research. Since the TCB was established in 2009, the crucial role played by TCL in research into ticks and the diseases they transmit has become increasingly clear. Indeed, interest in TCL and the methods used to generate them has spread to encompass pathogens transmitted by other arthropods such as mites, fleas and lice. With environmental and climate change driving the emergence of new vector-borne diseases, the demand for cell lines derived from ticks and other arthropods is likely to continue to increase in the future. This proposal includes generation of novel cell lines from ticks, mites and insects such as sand flies and midges both in-house and through dissemination of the required expertise to scientists in laboratories specialising in these arthropods. Establishment of TCL takes many years and requires specialised expertise, much patience and, importantly, a stable background of laboratory support. The TCB has brought together almost all the TCL available worldwide into a single repository and point of contact for supply of TCL and training in their maintenance (essential for successful transfer of TCL to recipient laboratories). The TCB has been enormously successful over the past 7 years, generating 18 new TCL, supplying TCL to 71 recipient laboratories and training 80 young scientists representing 27 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, North and South America. This proposal includes a workpackage specifically aimed at raising the profile of, and improving access to, TCL and training in lower and middle-income countries, by establishing outposts of the TCB in Malaysia, Kenya and Brazil. TCL from the TCB have already facilitated a wide range of studies, but much remains to be done. UK and global research has only scratched the surface of knowledge of these economically important and biologically fascinating parasites, their microbiota and the pathogens they transmit. Continued maintenance and expansion of the unique resource represented by the TCB, including genomic and molecular characterisation of TCL and generation of new arthropod cell lines, is essential to support this research now and for many years to come.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-BB_P024270_1

Start Date:

2017-07-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£637,455.55


The gnatwork: building capacity for research on neglected tropical vectors

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The vector-borne disease challenge this network addresses is to develop multidisciplinary techniques that can be used in research across three neglected vector groups: biting midges, sandflies and blackflies. These groups are responsible for the transmission of internationally important pathogens worldwide and disproportionately impact upon countries receiving official development assistance from the UK. At present, communication between communities studying midges, sandflies and blackflies is almost non-existent for a wide variety of reasons, mostly associated with differences in the type of pathogens each group transmits and the host in which they cause disease. The single most important bottleneck shared in research of all these haematophagous insects, however, is their small body size. This imposes constraints on a vast range of research areas from behavioural ecology to genomics and often precludes recruitment of new workers due to their perceived difficulty as subjects. When combined with fluctuations in funding that are an intrinsic factor in pathogen research this creates a significant challenge in retaining a critical mass of researchers, particularly in countries where medical and veterinary priorities change rapidly. By bringing together workers in two countries where research is relevant to development, we can make significant progress in translating techniques across all three vector groups and build a more resilient research base for these groups. The network management board contains acknowledged and established experts on biting midges, sandflies and blackflies and early career researchers with an equal gender balance. We will initially base the project in Bangladesh and Brazil where there are existing communities of workers on all three groups that remain entirely disconnected. We have therefore recruited management leads for both Brazil and Bangladesh who will work with the Director and co-Director to bring together workers through project meetings. At these meetings, we will use workshops to train students and early career researchers with a pragmatic approach in establishing a sufficient baseline of expertise to improve working practices. Areas that we feel can be significantly improved are in experimental design, taxonomy of insect fauna and practical fieldwork projects. We have also focussed on epidemiological techniques that share similarities between the groups including the analysis of surveillance data on spatial and temporal levels. As part of the network, we will also fund six catalyst projects of up to £100k across two calls. The aim of these projects will be to provide validated approaches for techniques that can be used across the three vector groups and potentially extended to others. There will be a clear emphasis during these projects in providing data quickly to as broad a proportion of the community as possible as the aim is to underpin larger collaborative applications. There will be a requirement for at least a proportion of each study to be conducted in either Brazil, or Bangladesh, or both countries. The development of south-south relationships will be a feature of the project as communities studying these vector communities in the two countries have few current lines of collaboration and face similar logistical issues in implementing research in the field. The use of students and early career researchers in these research projects will be encouraged and each will have a high profile on the network website to enhance career prospects.

Project identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-BB_R005362_1

Start Date:

2017-07-03

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£1,075,633.89




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