Go to main content

UK aid from the British people
  1. Home
  2. Search Results
Default filter shows currently active Programmes. To see Programmes at other stages, use the status filters.

Now showing Programmes related to: "Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine"

Advanced Filters

Advanced Filters

To search for Programmes in a specific time period, please enter the start and end dates.

Start Date
For example, 01 01 2007
End Date
For example, 12 11 2007
Results:
1 - 20 of 49

Filters Clear all

Activity Status

Government Department(s)

Tags

Sectors

Participating Orgs

Benefiting Countries

Benefiting Regions

Document Categories

FCDO - Leaving no-one behind: transforming Gendered pathways to Health for TB

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

The LIGHT Consortium: (Leaving no-one behInd: transforming Gendered pathways to Health for TB) is a UK Aid-funded programme that will deliver transformative, cross-disciplinary research across a consortium of partners based in Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Uganda and the UK to reduce the number of people affected by tuberculosis (TB) in sub- Saharan Africa being left behind. This will enable rapid deployment of new tools for TB control (vaccines, new drugs and shorter drug regimens, diagnostics) that are expected to come online in 2025.

Programme identifier:

GB-CHC-222655-LIGHT

Start Date:

2020-05-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£7,890,060


NIHR - IMPALA - International Multidisciplinary Programme to Address Lung Health and TB in Africa

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

The International Multidisciplinary Programme to Address Lung Health and TB in Africa “IMPALA” is a four-year collaborative programme funded by the National Institute of Health Research under the Global Health Research call. IMPALA aims at generating new scientific knowledge and implementable solutions for these high-burden diseases, through multi- disciplinary collaborative work involving clinical, social, health systems, health economics and implementation scientists from Africa and the UK.

Programme identifier:

GB-CHC-222655-IMPALA

Start Date:

2017-06-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£7,048,631.04


FCDO - ReBUILD - Health Systems Financing

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

The goal of the health systems financing RPC is to generate high quality evidence that contributes to improving the health of the poorest in LMIC states. The purpose is to deliver new knowledge to inform the development and implementation of pro-poor health systems.

Programme identifier:

GB-CHC-222655-PO5247ReBUILD

Start Date:

2011-02-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£128,721


FCDO - ReBuild for Resilience R4R

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

To improve access and utilisation by the poor, vulnerable and marginalised people living in fragile and shock prone settings (FASP) to effective and equitable healthcare, leading to greater financial protection and better health. The programme will deliver research evidence on how to develop resilience capacities to ensure responsive, effective, inclusive, gender-equitable and sustainable health systems in FASP; and disseminate findings, exert influence to help ensure evidence based policy and practice.

Programme identifier:

GB-CHC-222655-R4R

Start Date:

2020-05-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


FCDO - COUNTDOWN: Programme of Implementation Research to Inform the Effective and Sustainable Scaling-Up of Integrated Neglected Tropical Disease Control Initiatives

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

COUNTDOWN is a 7-year (2014-2021) programme of implementation research supporting the scale-up of appropriate interventions in sub-Saharan Africa against NTDs amenable to preventive chemotherapy approaches. COUNTDOWN brings together researchers from a range of backgrounds and disciplines, from health care providers, policy makers, laboratory scientists, research uptake specialists, Ministries of Health and Non-Governmental Development Organisations. COUNTDOWN’s intended future impact is to “Reduce morbidity, mortality and poverty associated with NTDs from application of new evidence for cost effective scale-up of sustained control and targeted elimination of disease in line with the WHO 2020 NTD Roadmap and the 2030 SDGs” and to improve availability, acceptability affordability, and accessibility of NTD interventions to individuals and communities.

Programme identifier:

GB-CHC-222655-PO6407

Start Date:

2014-11-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£8,014,011


FCDO - Research, Evidence & Development Initiative (READ-It)

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

About READ-It - Over the past 20 years there has been a concerted effort to use reliable evidence in making decisions about health care. READ-It aims to improve the evidence base and ensure its dissemination. READ-It helps ensure healthcare problems relevant to low- and middle-income countries are addressed, and that people living in these countries are part of the process. It is a major contributor to Cochrane, a global organization committed to preparing and updating systematic reviews, and coordinates the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG) and assists Cochrane in developing methods and editorial processes. It also works closely with policy makers. READ-It focuses on two main areas: - Reliable, up-to-date, scientifically defensible and relevant evidence in malaria and tuberculosis, child health, maternal health and health systems. - Effective dialogue and influence between research, policy and practice communities in public and private sector. READ-It's activities include: - Preparing and updating Cochrane Reviews about the effects of health care relevant to low- and middle-income countries. - Identifying approaches to ensure dissemination and use of the results of systematic reviews in decision making.

Programme identifier:

GB-CHC-222655-300342-104

Start Date:

2018-05-15

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£6,049,058.51


Co-design of an intervention to address alcohol use among adolescent boys and young men in Tanzania

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

The project addresses a critical evidence gap in how to comprehensively address alcohol initiation, use and abuse amongst adolescent boys and young men (ABYM) in sub Saharan Africa (SSA). The most recent survey of global health found that alcohol is the biggest risk factor for death among 15-49 year old men in the world. Death from preventable causes in Africa, such as interpersonal violence among male adolescents (aged 10-19 years) is higher than in any other region. Adolescent alcohol use is an important cause of these problems and predominantly amongst boys and young men. Drinking at an early age makes it more likely that you will be an alcoholic in adulthood, and causes poor adult health and bad effects on family, employment, and society. Interventions to decrease alcohol use among male adolescents could decrease death and illness in Africa and let boys reach their full potential. Some studies in rich countries have shown that these interventions might work, but very few have been tested in sub Saharan Africa. The way young people drink in Tanzania is like many other places in East and Central Africa. Our research will therefore be useful to other African settings. Also, our research team has experience and skill in adolescent health research in Tanzania with in-country partnerships and networks already in place. Local teachers, people who work with young people and key people from the ministries of health and education have asked us to help develop interventions for their male adolescents, in recognition that current international focus has been on the girl-child. Our research also supports the World Health Organisation (WHO) Global Strategy to Reduce the Harmful Use of Alcohol and will help fill gaps in alcohol policy in East Africa. The project is a partnership between two leading UK and Tanzanian research and learning institutes, a Tanzanian referral hospital and research centre, three Tanzanian based community based organisation, and local government authorities nationally and within two districts of Tanzania. Our overall aim is to co-create a package of school and community interventions and develop strategies to optimise the interplay between them in order to prevent, delay and reduce alcohol use among adolescent males in high alcohol use settings in Tanzania. This will be achieved through 4 specific objectives: OBJECTIVE 1: To understand what people in the community think about what makes adolescent boys and young men drink and how and where that drinking happens OBJECTIVE 2: To work with people in the community do design activities in the community and schools that will prevent and decrease alcohol use among adolescent boys and young men. OBJECTIVE 3: To assess the whether the relevant people like the intervention and believe that it will work OBJECTIVE 4: To collect information to help design a bigger study that will see if the intervention actually works. Our research project will directly benefit Tanzanian adolescent boys and young men, their communities, teachers and school officials as well as local and national government. We will discover new ways to develop complex interventions to decrease drinking amongst young people, especially those who are vulnerable. What we learn will be shared with politicians, people who work with with young people and researchers. It will also help us plan a larger study to test how the intervention works on a large scale.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-MR_V032380_1

Start Date:

2021-03-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


Newton STFC-NARIT: Using astronomy education as a motivator for long-term capacity building in STEM

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Astronomy is an area of science that interests and excites almost everyone - across all age, gender, social and cultural groups. However, this is in contrast to the science that it is part of, and the technology that drives it, which are often perceived as ""boring"" or ""too complicated"". This dislike (or even distrust) of science and technology can lead to even very young children deciding that science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) are not for them, closing down exciting career options before they are even aware that they exist. In the long term, this can cause significant problems for a nation, particularly one like Thailand, which needs an ever larger high-tech workforce if it is to continue to develop its economy. In the UK, the National Schools' Observatory (NSO) have for over two decade been using astronomy to help overcome these prejudices in younger children before they fully develop, and show them the possibilities that STEM careers can offer. In this project the NSO's experience will be shared with Thai astronomers, along with a wealth of educational resources and, most importantly, direct access to observations from the world's largest fully-robotic telescope - the Liverpool Telescope (LT) - and data from Thailands own national telescopes. This will provide a big boost for Thai education, and help Thai astronomers to share the excitement of what they do with a new, important, young audience.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-ST_T007117_1

Start Date:

2020-03-02

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£108,532.76


A telescope control system for the next generation of facilities

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Since 2017 we have been undertaking a collaborative project of software and hardware development towards a new telescope control system for current and new UK and Thai telescopes. In 2017 we were awarded a year of funding for the first phase of this project, which is focused around a requirements analysis and prototype of critical parts of the proposed system for benchmarking against the existing Liverpool Telescope systems. We apply here for funding to continue this project into its final phase, in which we will develop the telescope control system with the aim of full deployment on the Thai National Telescope in 2021. Thailand has a burgeoning astronomical community and an impressive array of existing infrastructure, along with an established engineering team for the support of operations. However, since much of their equipment has been purchased from external suppliers some of the systems are poorly understood. The TNT control systems for example are based around a proprietary, closed source software, and their network of 0.7 metre telescopes have also been supplied with an entirely different, dedicated interface. This is a risk for the long term stability of these facilities, compromises productivity and limits the ability of the NARIT team to provide upgrades to the current system. The ARI owns and operates the LT, with operational support from STFC. This facility has a bespoke and established telescope control system (TCS), which is well documented, well understood and with source code available. However, by modern standards it is out-dated. Our collaborative development project will deliver a control framework which can be deployed on a variety of different facilities. The end product will be a versatile, modular system which will be used on facilities owned by both partners. This will be deployed initially on the TNT, enhancing its scientific and outreach productivity. In the medium term this will replace the system in use on the Liverpool Telescope (LT), and form the basis of the control systems for the NRT project: a major international collaboration with NARIT participation. Aside from the software itself the key benefit for NARIT will be knowledge transfer from the Liverpool Telescope group, which has over a decade of telescope control system experience and expertise. This will provide the NARIT group with the capability to build new control systems for future hardware, such as the Thai radio telescope currently under construction.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-ST_T00715X_1

Start Date:

2020-03-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£210,641.16


Household air pollution and risk of esophageal cancer: a case-control study in Western Kenya

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Esophageal cancer is the third most common cancer and cause of cancer death in both men and women in Kenya, with 3000+ newly diagnosed patients in 2012. This pattern is common to other East African countries and West Kenya appears to have extremely high rates of the disease. This status contrasts to much of West Africa where the cancer is extremely rare, i.e. 40 times lower. Sadly, the majority of these patients pass away within 6 months of their diagnosis, few being able to afford the limited treatment options. Additionally, up to 15% of patients are very young, in their 20s and 30s. Despite researchers having known about this unusual disease pattern since the 1950s, the risk factors for the disease had hardly been studied prior to 2014. Consequently, there are no targeted strategies to prevent the disease, and no prediction models to identify who might be at high risk of the disease, people whom may benefit from early detection. In 2014, we - i.e. the Kenya PI Dr Diana Menya of Moi University, Eldoret - commenced the first comprehensive study of lifestyle, environmental and genetic factors for esophageal cancer in Kenya. The study was conducted at the Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret, which serves a catchment population stretching to the Ugandan border. In the study, patients newly diagnosed with esophageal cancer were compared to hospital patients and hospital visitors who did not have the disease. The study blood and tumour samples were also collected for genetic analyses. Results from the study have shown that alcohol and tobacco contribute to the disease in older men, but not in women or in young patients, a knowledge gap which the present study hopes to fill through a UK-Kenya collaboration between Dr Menya and Dr Daniel Pope, a household air pollution expert from the University of Liverpool. This study hypothesizes that household air pollution, from using biomass for cooking in poorly ventilated kitchens, is a large contributor to esophageal cancer in the young and in women, through traditional domestic roles associated with cooking. Household air pollution from biomass and coal use is already an established lung carcinogen, but few studies have examined its influence on esophageal cancer. However, work in an Iranian area of high esophageal cancer rates has shown that chemical compounds formed after combustion of biomass fuels are implicated in esophageal cancer risk in that setting. In this UK-Kenya collaboration, we propose to continue the core study as previously successfully implemented, and add to it an in-depth component on household air pollution as measured in kitchens and for personal exposures during household visits to a subset of female and younger (< 40 years) participants who live within reach of the referral hospital. A detailed analysis of oesophageal cancer risk with household air pollution will be provided and finally, considering a range of lifestyle and environmental risk factors, a comprehensive report on the strategies needed for primary prevention esophageal cancer in Kenya will be developed. Rates of this disease have declined in many areas of the world - Kenya should be able to follow this trend.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-MR_S009051_1

Start Date:

2019-01-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£383,282.09


Neuropsychiatric problems related to HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy in Cape Town

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Neuropsychiatric problems are common in people living with HIV (PLWH). Cognitive impairment (ie. problems with thinking and memory) can affect around a quarter of PLWH and is often associated with depression and other mental health symptoms. These problems can have a major impact on the person involved, causing difficulties with daily functioning and decision-making, reduced employment and overall poorer quality of life. In addition, people with neuropsychiatric problems are less likely to take their HIV medication regularly, meaning that there is a risk that the treatment could become ineffective. PLWH who do not take their medication regularly (called poor adherence) are more likely to become unwell from HIV, and there is an increased risk they will pass the virus to someone else. In some PLWH neuropsychiatric problems can be related to damage to the brain, either from the HIV virus itself or from the antiretroviral medication taken to combat HIV. There is little known about the extent of this problem in South Africa, how to test for it and what to do to help those affected. This is an important area of research as these factors are potentially treatable. To investigate this we will perform a brief screening test for cognitive problems in Cape Town clinics. Based on this we will ask 178 people to be involved in our study - half with cognitive problems and half without. These will undergo more detailed neuropsychiatric profiling involving a computer based test of cognitive function and a series of questionnaires related to mental health symptoms. We will assess their adherence to medication by looking at how often they pick up their tablets and how much medication can be measured in their blood. We will then perform a lumbar puncture (LP); this involves putting a needle into the lower spine to take a sample of the fluid that sits around the brain and spinal cord, called cerebrospinal fluid or CSF. We will test the CSF to see if there is HIV virus at greater levels than in blood; this can occur in around 5-10% of patients and may be due to the lower concentrations of antiretroviral drugs found in the brain and CSF. It can cause inflammation to the brain and hence neuropsychiatric problems. We will then change their HIV treatment from efavirenz (current most common treatment in South Africa) to dolutegravir (a newer, more effective treatment). We will repeat testing and LP 6 months later. This will allow us to see to what extent HIV in the brain is causing neuropsychiatric problems, and whether dolutegravir is an effective treatment for this. Efavirenz can be toxic to the brain potentially leading to cognitive problems and/or depression. Although dolutegravir has fewer side effects it can also be toxic to the brain, causing anxiety and insomnia in some patients. As well as assessing symptoms we will measure drug concentrations in blood and CSF. This will allow us to investigate the toxic effects of these drugs on the brain. We will also test patients DNA to see whether genetic differences play a role in determining which patients are most affected. ODA compliance: The reason we are interested in these factors is that both HIV in the brain and drug toxicity can potentially be treated, offering a way to help PLWH with neuropsychiatric problems, and perhaps offer new ways to tackle poor adherence to medication. Such treatments would improve the welfare of PLWH and increase their potential to earn a living, support their family and contribute to society. Guidelines developed in Europe and North America suggest that PLWH should be routinely tested for cognitive impairment, and a LP performed if other causes have been excluded. We don't know whether this advice is appropriate for South Africa where the challenges are different and resources are more limited. This study will provide useful information to guide public health policy decisions in this area, ensuring funds are allocated most effectively.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-MR_S008829_1

Start Date:

2019-01-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£0


Understanding and addressing the impact of stressful live events on the mental health of older adults in Colombia

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Colombia has suffered political violence since the 1950s notably la violencia, more recently drug cartel and migrant flows linked. These severely impact citizens. Colombians are now being affected by the global COVID-19 pandemic. It remains unclear how these events are affecting residents' mental health and wellbeing, particularly older adults. The proportion of Colombian older adults is expected to double from 10% to 20% by 2050. This rise increasingly impacting upon Colombians, particularly in regions like Urabá in the Department of Antioquia, that have suffered throughout their history from inequality and lack of development due to inattention from the state and the constant presence of prolonged political conflict that deepens these structural inequalities. Those over 60 years of age have witnessed the history of violence in the country, as victims or perpetrators (for those who were part of armed groups). These account for a complex understanding of the conflict and turn them into the advocates for peace, as they have witnessed the dire consequences of war -they have suffered and survived them. In this sense, the elderly in Colombia are the ones who weave the life-story memories of the conflict, but suffer consequences. Our research centres on the municipality of Turbo, typical of such regions and populations. Uraba Antioqueno has been one of the territories most affected by the Colombian armed conflict in the last six decades. It is considered one of the regions of the Department of Antioquia with the highest numbers of expulsion of people for reasons related to the armed conflict or violence, though at the same time it is one of the main receiving areas for victims from Choco in the Pacific region and the Atlantic coast, as well as the migratory transit of foreigners from Africa and Latin America who seek reaching the United States. In 2020 413,397 inhabitants (78.6% of the total regional population of 525,685) were registered as victims of the armed conflict. In Turbo, the proportion is 64.5% (83,993 victims). In the region, 9.7% (n=14,425) are classed as older adults, living in urban, rural, peri-urban and dispersed rural areas. Our proposal embeds co-production with public and professional advisors throughout. We have already been undertaking consultations with local older residents and professionals in determining the approach and designing the project. This proposal will collect and combine key existing datasets added to new information collected using mental health surveys and both individual interviews and focus groups to map the mental health condition and pressures on older adults, suffering from decades of conflict and now COVID19. These findings will link with a systematic review of interventions to support the mental health of older adults in lower and middle income countries (LMICs), with a particular focus on conflict survivors, linked to in-depth interviews with international academic experts. The evidence summary, combined with quantitative and qualitative data from Turbo will be used to co-design and test a community-based psychosocial care strategy and intervention with, and for, Turbo older residents to reduce and manage mental health problems. It will address the situations identified at family and community levels in the Turbo research phases, linking with different regional health and welfare systems and datasets. This will then be evaluated as a pilot for its cost effectiveness, impact on mental health and other key factors as well as acceptability to professionals and service users. The findings will be used to inform a larger formal trial grant application across wider populations; as well as guides to implementing the approach more widely to support its application across other populations, within Colombia and other LMICs; as well as higher income countries, starting with England, with a focus on addressing the mental health needs of migrants who have experienced conflict.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-ES_V013246_1

Start Date:

2021-02-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£317,167.51


Improving diagnosis of brain infections in Indonesia using novel and established molecular diagnostic tools.

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Brain infections, such as meningitis and encephalitis, are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in Indonesia, as elsewhere, with considerable costs to families, health care and society. The key step in early patient management is to distinguish bacterial causes, which need immediate antibiotic treatment, from the many clinical mimics, such as viral meningitis, which do not. The gold standard for distinguishing the two is lumbar puncture, followed by microscopy and culture of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). However, culture results are often delayed, or inconclusive. Many patients are therefore treated with unnecessary antibiotics until a diagnosis of bacterial meningitis is excluded, contributing to the burden of antimicrobial resistance. In Liverpool, we have developed the TRanscripts to Identify bacterial Meningitis (TRIM) test. It is a host transcript-based diagnostic blood test. We have shown it exhibits high sensitivity (100%), specificity (90%) and negative predictive value (100%) in distinguishing adult bacterial meningitis from mimics (viral meningitis or meningism [where patients have clinical symptoms of meningitis but the number of white blood cells in the CSF is not raised]). A key advantage of the TRIM test is that results can be rapidly available (in under four hours) from sample arrival in the laboratory. As a rapid, accurate and low cost (target cost under £10 per patient) blood test, the TRIM test offers improved rule-out of bacterial brain infections, enhancing patient management and promoting cessation of unnecessary antimicrobial use. In partnership with Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM), Indonesia, preliminary work assessing the TRIM assay at UGM indicate it maintains high accuracy (100%) in distinguishing bacterial infection from mimics among child and adult Indonesian patients with symptoms/signs of meningitis or encephalitis. Our second diagnostic approach is to use pathogen-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and antibody tests; through these we have increased pathogen detection among children with suspected meningo-encephalitis at UGM by over 30 percent (from 11% to 42%), through a pilot of systematic testing of CSF. In this three year study, we will assess the accuracy of the TRIM test in a larger cohort of Indonesian patients with suspected meningo-encephalitis, recruited through hospitals linked to UGM and Universitas of Indonesia. Alongside, we will increase pathogen detection through pathogen-specific PCR and antibody testing at these sites. To improve our pathogen-specific PCR panel, we will perform next generation sequencing, at the Eijkman Institute, Indonesia, on CSF samples where no pathogen has been detected. Sequence information from identified pathogens will be used to inform PCR test design. Linking with the University of Warwick, we will evaluate the cost-effectiveness of introducing these diagnostic tools into routine clinical care for suspected brain infection patients in Indonesian hospitals. This study will assess and implement novel and established diagnostic tools among Indonesian brain infection patients. In the longer-term, these tools will support more appropriate treatment of brain infections among Indonesian patients, strengthen local research capacity and collaboration between UK and Indonesia.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-MR_S019960_1

Start Date:

2019-04-30

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£335,608.59


Intermittent preventive treatment with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine: a new malaria strategy to prevent adverse birth outcomes in Papua, Indonesia

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Reducing the adverse outcomes of malaria in pregnancy in Indonesia The control of malaria in pregnancy in Indonesia, where approximately 10% of pregnant women get infected with malaria, could receive a potential boost through a new study in Papua, Indonesia. A partnership between the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (UK) and the Timika Research Facility in Papua Indonesia will conduct a holistic evaluation of a promising new drug-based regimen for preventing malaria and its harmful effects in pregnancy. When pregnant women contract malaria, the infection can have devastating consequences for pregnancy, resulting in fever which may trigger the preterm onset of labour or even pregnancy loss. It is also possible for women to be infected without showing any outward signs or symptoms, yet if these infections are undetected and left untreated, they can cause severe anaemia in the mother and can interfere with the growth of the fetus leading to low birth weight, which makes babies more vulnerable to infections, growth retardation and dying during the first year of life. The new study will support the Indonesian Ministry of Health to identify the best way to deliver a new preventive regimen for the control of malaria in pregnancy called intermittent preventive treatment or IPT for short. IPT is used in most countries in Africa but not yet in Asia. With this IPT strategy, pregnant women without symptoms of malaria attending routine antenatal care in selected health facilities in Papua, Indonesia, will receive monthly treatment with a long-acting antimalarial drug called dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) that provides four weeks of prophylaxis after each dose. Currently women are screened for malaria at their first antenatal care visit and women are treated with DP only if tested positive. In the new strategy, women will receive the drug as monthly prophylaxis without prior blood testing for malaria parasites. A recent trial in Indonesia has shown that this intervention, when taken as directed, is very effective in preventing malaria in expectant mothers. However, the concept of using drugs for prevention by women who do not have malaria symptoms is new to this region. Indeed, this would be the first time that the IPT strategy would be used in South East Asia. The study is designed to find the best ways for the Ministry of Health to introduce and deliver this new intervention and use stepwise quality improvement approaches to understand what worked, for whom, and why during each step in the implementation phase to help improve delivery of the new intervention and quality of service provision on an ongoing basis. Opportunities to bring the intervention close to the community through health posts where most women receive antenatal care will be strengthened. The study will also determine the costs and cost-effectiveness of the new strategy, compared with the current strategy, to inform policy decision making for malaria prevention among pregnant women in Indonesia. This will also be of relevance to other parts of South East Asia. It is anticipated that the study, by increasing the effectiveness of malaria prevention, has the potential to increase the provision and uptake of additional ANC services that prevent other causes of adverse birth outcomes in pregnancy. The final study results will be shared with the local offices of the Ministry of Health and the National malaria, and reproductive health departments in Indonesia to inform policy decision making for rolling out the strategy. The study will thereby contribute to improved outcomes for mothers and their infants in Indonesia, whose quality of life, health and creative output will be enhanced. This will be a 32-month study, six months for study preparation, 22 months field work, data collection and data processing, and four months to conclude analysis and reporting.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-MR_T038489_1

Start Date:

2021-01-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£970,244.02


Informed mining: risk reduction through enhanced public and institutional risk awareness (IM AWARE)

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Lax governance policies allow poor business practices which can lead to dramatic disasters and shocking fatalities. In reaction to the consequent public outcry, legislation tightens governance policies. There have been countless examples of this cycle, including laws resulting from boiler explosions, drug scams, and events such as the Johnstown flood. We must short-circuit this upward spiral so it does not require the fatalities to drive it forward. Scientifically grounded multistakeholder governance has been proposed as a scheme to accomplish this, but little empirical evidence shows it is useful, especially in the context of countervailing economic forces and entrenched interests. Despite the enhanced awareness with several recent high-profile mine tailings dam disasters, mine operators and site workers do not practice good risk management. Several factors have been proposed including a lack of trust and fear of reprisal. This is exacerbated by failed efforts to reduce the vulnerability of communities through relocation of settlements, which are usually met with suspicious protests. A general climate of fear is precipitated by the misconception that risk management is counterproductive to economic competitiveness. The project explores the beliefs of stakeholders constructed because of dominating actors, cultural factors, and the local context. Interviews will explore individual perceptions of risk and their implications for the co-development of mitigation strategies. The results will inform the multistakeholder workshops, each convened to address specific challenges relating to participatory management. Participant experience will be evaluated, as will approaches for communication and the role of science in this interaction. Sociocultural metrics for (i) risk neglect, (ii) low propensity to trust, (iii) distance to power (empowerment and social responsibility), and (iv) short-termism/commodity mentality will also be evaluated in the initial interviews and throughout the project. This creates an evidence base for the efficacy of multistakeholder governance models for mine tailings storage. Applying this across two case studies at different sites will evidence the adaptive capacity of the approach, and justification for its adoption across Brazil. A problem in participatory management is information asymmetry. Science can assuage this problem and provide a context for discussion and common decision making. The project will evaluate the effect of risk awareness on motivating near-term engineering interventions (e.g., decanting, pipe draining, etc.) and directing long-term construction and business practices of the industry that will reduce deaths and other risks suffered by economically disadvantaged vulnerable downstream populations, and preventing destruction of agricultural lands and the environment generally. The work will seek to demonstrate risk awareness does not threaten but can enhance economic competitiveness, addressing disaster management and sustainable development, even for mining operations, by sustaining mine operations, improving health of workers, reducing adverse impacts on workforce, reducing legal liabilities from dam failures and leachate releases, and forestalling legislative and regulatory strictures. The interests of mine owners and at-risk communities are not commonly seen as aligned. However, using science as the medium for identifying common interests, the project will create an evidence base addressing the efficacy of different schemes in efforts to reduce information asymmetry and, particularly, the use of scientific analysis to enhance risk awareness and communication which are fundamental to participatory management. The project's empirical results will be broadly relevant to other implementations of multistakeholder governance schemes, and its specific software developments are directly applicable to stability of water dams and landslides which are among the deadliest hazards.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-ES_T003537_1

Start Date:

2019-11-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£866,331.61


The Tick Cell Biobank - a UK and international biological resource

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Ticks are bloodfeeding arthropods which, as well as causing direct damage to their hosts, transmit many diseases of livestock, companion animals and humans. Research into prevention and cure of these diseases, caused by viruses, bacteria, protozoa and filarial worms, is greatly assisted by the use of cell culture systems to study both how tick cells function, and how and why they transmit disease-causing pathogens. Such culture systems, called cell lines, have been developed for many disease-carrying ticks, but they require special skills and much time and patience to establish and maintain. Seven years ago a central collection, the Tick Cell Biobank (TCB), was created for all the tick cell lines available now and in future. The TCB distributes tick cell lines (TCL) on request to research scientists all over the world and provides essential training in their maintenance. The TCB also carries out characterisation studies on TCL, as very little is known about most of them, and is creating new cell lines from species of ticks not already represented in the collection. This proposal requests funding to secure the long-term future of the TCB as an essential resource underpinning UK and international tick and tick-borne disease research, to expand the resource to include cell lines derived from other important arthropods such as biting midges, mites and honeybees, and to give added value to the cell lines through characterisation, cloning and genome sequencing, thereby ensuring that these unique and invaluable biological resources continue to be available to the scientists who need to use them in biomedical, veterinary and agricultural research. Since the TCB was established in 2009, the crucial role played by TCL in research into ticks and the diseases they transmit has become increasingly clear. Indeed, interest in TCL and the methods used to generate them has spread to encompass pathogens transmitted by other arthropods such as mites, fleas and lice. With environmental and climate change driving the emergence of new vector-borne diseases, the demand for cell lines derived from ticks and other arthropods is likely to continue to increase in the future. This proposal includes generation of novel cell lines from ticks, mites and insects such as sand flies and midges both in-house and through dissemination of the required expertise to scientists in laboratories specialising in these arthropods. Establishment of TCL takes many years and requires specialised expertise, much patience and, importantly, a stable background of laboratory support. The TCB has brought together almost all the TCL available worldwide into a single repository and point of contact for supply of TCL and training in their maintenance (essential for successful transfer of TCL to recipient laboratories). The TCB has been enormously successful over the past 7 years, generating 18 new TCL, supplying TCL to 71 recipient laboratories and training 80 young scientists representing 27 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, North and South America. This proposal includes a workpackage specifically aimed at raising the profile of, and improving access to, TCL and training in lower and middle-income countries, by establishing outposts of the TCB in Malaysia, Kenya and Brazil. TCL from the TCB have already facilitated a wide range of studies, but much remains to be done. UK and global research has only scratched the surface of knowledge of these economically important and biologically fascinating parasites, their microbiota and the pathogens they transmit. Continued maintenance and expansion of the unique resource represented by the TCB, including genomic and molecular characterisation of TCL and generation of new arthropod cell lines, is essential to support this research now and for many years to come.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-BB_P024270_1

Start Date:

2017-07-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£840,640.94


Participatory research to support the development of culturally sensitive mental health and wellbeing services for the Kankuamo people of Colombia

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

Phase 1: Knowledge Dialogue (Months 1-8) A) Literature review - application of capability approach with indigenous populations; B) Five stakeholder engagement workshops aimed at enhancing understanding about the mental health and quality of life of the Kankuamo people will be held. Sixty individuals (including traditional healers, community elders, health workers) will be purposively sampled from across the twelve Kankuamo communities. Data will be collected using Module One the Design, Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation (DIME) approach. Module 1 of DIME elicits relevant qualitative information about: 1) Problems that adults in the community face; 2) The key function/tasks that adults are required to frequently undertake for themselves, their families, and their communities; 3) The advice that is currently provided by recognised community experts (i.e. key informants) to address the problems. Building on our work in Uganda and Rwanda as part of the ESRC funded COSTAR project (ES/S000976/1), this work will include a focus on the Capability Approach (Sen, 1999) through the inclusion of an additional question that will ask community members to indicate: 'What does a good life mean to you?'. Phase II: Developing Assessment Instruments (Months 9-13) A) Development or adaptation of assessment instruments for: i) common mental disorders, ii) quality of life based on the qualitative findings from Phase I. This will be guided by Module two of the DIME approach and will utilise the data collected in Phase 1. B) Piloting of Assessment Instrument - the two assessment instruments developed in Phase IIA will be piloted according to Module Three of the DIME Approach. Data collection will take place via a survey of 380 households across the 12 Kankuamo and will be undertaken by the participants of phase I, accompanied by members from the research team. The survey will include the novel assessment instruments for common mental disorders and quality of life, as well as internationally recognised standardised measures of depressive symptoms (i.e. PHQ-9) and quality of life (WHOQoL-BREF). Following the completion of the survey, purposive sampling will be used to recruit a subsample of participants into focus groups discussions (1 FGD of 10 people for each of the 12 communities; total N = 120) to provide qualitative feedback about the assessment instruments (including the cultural acceptability). C) Validation of the assessment instruments - Correlational analyses will be conducted on the data collected in Phase IIB to determine the construct validity of the new assessment instruments compared to PHQ9 and WHOQoL-BREF. Phase III: Guideline development (Months 13-20) Members from all 12 Kankuamo communities (N=120) will be invited to a combination of focus groups, workshops and interactive activities over a 2-day period to co-produce guidelines for the development and delivery of culturally sensitive primary care community mental health support. This will include consideration of ethical and legal obligations of stakeholders. Phase IV: Development and evaluation of the training program (Months 20-30) This phase will involve the development, delivery and evaluation of a training program aimed at training Community Wellbeing Advocate (CWA) to identify people experiencing mental health difficulties within the Kankuamo community, and to signpost them to appropriate, locally available, forms of support. A) Develop a short 3-day CWA training program based on the findings from Phase I, Phase II and Phase III. B) Deliver a 3-day CWA training program to participants (N=60). C) Evaluate: i) the acceptability of the CWA training program (two FGD of up to 8 CWA trainees 1-month post-training, ii) feedback from community members who have interacted with the CWA (2 FGD of up to 8 community members). D) Adjust the CWA training programme according to feedback received from the CWA trainees and community members in Phase IVC.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--Newton-ES_V013416_1

Start Date:

2021-02-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£307,182.04


NIHR Global Health Research Groups: research call 2

UK - Department of Health (DH)

The NIHR's second Global Health Research call for Groups. UK universities and research institutes were invited to submit applications, working in equitable partnerships with researchers in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), to develop their ambitions to deliver world-class applied global health research to address under-funded or under-researched global health areas specific to those countries.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-10-NIHR_GHRG2

Start Date:

2018-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£45,255,360.85


NIHR Global Health Research Units and Groups: research call 1

UK - Department of Health (DH)

The NIHR's first Global Health Research call for Units and Groups. UK universities and research institutes were invited to submit applications, working in equitable partnerships with researchers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), to either expand (Units) or develop (Groups) their ambitions to deliver world-class applied global health research to address under-funded or under-researched global health areas specific to those countries.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-10-NIHR_GHRUG1

Start Date:

2017-04-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£128,940,425.80


Psychological, social & biological predictors of child mental health and development: shared and distinctive risk and protective factors in UK & India

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)

WHO figures estimate mental health problems affect 12.8% of children in India, which equates to 60 million children. There is an urgent need for culturally sensitive longitudinal studies of community samples starting in pregnancy, designed to examine the earliest origins of child mental health problems to optimally inform the development of new and early interventions. Our study aims to do this in India and the UK. Research in western settings suggest that child mental health problems arise from a complicated mix of social, psychological and biological influences, in which key factors probably include, prenatal stress, early infant temperament, and harsh parenting as risks, and warm parenting as protective factors. There is now good evidence that individual variations and environmental exposures in early life contribute to risk for mental health problems in later childhood and beyond. However, previous research has been conducted almost exclusively in countries with Westernised standards of medical care and family arrangements, and where additional risks such as low birth weight and under-nutrition are rare. The aims of the proposed research are to compare early risk and protective factors for childhood mental health problems in UK and India to identify those that are common to Western and South Asian populations and those that are distinctive. We propose to follow up around 741 families of children in the Bangalore Child Health and Development study (BCHADS) who are living in the urban slums of Bangalore city, at age 4.5 years and age 7 years. We will compare the information we gather on these children's lives to that of the children taking part in our UK Wirral Child Health and Development Study (already collected). In both studies we have two rich data sets with parallel measures of risk and protective factors for child mental health outcomes from pregnancy onwards, including age 8-10 wks, 6 months, 14 months, 2 years, 4 years and 7 years of age. We have gathered detailed repeated measurement of key likely 'shared risks' and associated 'mechanisms' for conferring risk (e.g., gene activity, stress reactivity) and these include measures of early life stress, social support, poverty and economic adversity, early temperament, and caregiving (touch, interaction quality, parenting quality), cognitive and physical development. We will also assess risk and protective factors that may be 'distinctive' or particularly relevant to the South Asian setting: maternal nutrition in pregnancy, early immune function and gender discrimination associated with cultural favouring of the male child, and the practice of shared-caregiving as opposed to primary maternal rearing in Western societies. We also aim to advance cross-cultural measurement methods and develop new culturally sensitive measures of gender discrimination and the 'shared caregiving' parenting environment in India. This work will aid clinicians and researchers to refine their measurements in clinical practice and be able to conduct more reliable research when trying to combine data from multiple cohorts. Finally, this is a joint UK-Indian study and together we will run a series of training events to build capacity and share expertise in conducting longitudinal cohort studies, sampling and retention, measurement issues, data management and state of the art statistical methods needed in longitudinal analysis of complex data sets.

Programme identifier:

GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-MR_S036466_1

Start Date:

2019-07-01

Activity Status:

Implementation

Total Budget:

£2,298,128.94




This site uses cookies

We use Google Analytics to measure how you use the website so we can improve it based on user needs. Google Analytics sets cookies that store anonymised information about how you got to the site, the internal pages you visit, how long you spend on each page and what you click on while you're visiting the site. Read more